Wednesday, May 30, 2007

Clear Your Schedules For Late July!

So, what are you doing July 25-29, 2007?

I say clear your schedules and register for a star-studded Civil War extravaganza coordinated by Ted Alexander and the Chambersburg Civil War Seminars & Tours. . .
This year the theme is Antietam and, as you may have already read on Mannie Gentile's blog (www.volunteersinparks.blogspot.com), it is sure to be quite an event. As Ted says, this is the "largest Antietam seminar ever!" More than forty speakers are scheduled, including myself, and I am incredibly excited. It was a great honor to be asked to participate, and when asked what I would like to focus on, well, naturally, I immediately said General James Nagle and his Brigade during the battle. So, I will be leading such a discussion on Friday, July 27, at the Plaza Hotel in Hagerstown, and the following day I will be leading 2 1/2 hour hikes that will follow in the footsteps of the Ninth Army Corps' final assault on the Confederate right. Starting at the Burnside Bridge, I will lead the tour along the Sherrick Farm Trail, following in the footsteps of Orlando Willcox's Division. We'll then walk our way through the Sherrick farm fields and focus on the attacks of Benjamin Christ's and Thomas Welsh's Brigades before crossing the Burnside Bridge Road where we will pass the Otto House and pick up the Final Attack Trail where I'll discuss the advance of Isaac Rodman's Division. I am greatly looking forward to it.
Joining me during this event will be fellow Antietam interps Mannie Gentile, Keith Snyder, Brian Baracz, Stephanie Gray, Mike Gamble, and Alann Schmidt. Also present will be some of the nation's leading authorities on the Civil War. . .
Instead of me telling you more, click on this link: http://www.chambersburgcivilwarseminars.org/ You can download the brochure and find out how to register.
We all hope to see you there!



Pottsville's Presbyterian Cemetery Walking Tour Brochure Now Online

Hey All~

Just a quick update. . .Tom Shay has uploaded the Presbyterian Cemetery Walking Tour Brochure as a pdf file on his Schuylkill County Civil War Discussion Group website http://home.comcast.net/~schuylkillcwrt/

If anyone is interested in printing it out, use Legal size, doublesided.....Although now available online, Tom is working hard to get it into print. So hopefully it will soon be available throughout Pottsville and Schuylkill County.

Thanks Tom for all of your efforts!

Monday, May 28, 2007

Schuylkill County Civil War Deaths

On this Memorial Day, I could not think of a more appropriate post than to list the names of Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, soldiers who gave their lives during the American Civil War. It is quite a lenghty post, with well over six hundred names, but it is instructive. Too often when discussing the Civil War, we simply state casualty numbers without seriously thinking about just how many lives were lost and how many were shattered. The names below, which are listed alphabetically, were those of men from just one small county in east-central Pennsylvania. And do keep in mind that this is not a comprehensive list. We all know how spotty Civil War records can be, and this list does not include the names of those men, scores perhaps hundreds, whose lives were cut far too short by war-related sickness and injury and passed away after the guns fell silent. Because this blog focuses on the 48th Pennsylvania, I have bolded their names in the list below.
* * * * * * * * * *

· Abraham Acker: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action at Petersburg, June 23, 1864
· John A. Ailer: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 22, 1864
· William Ainsworth: Co. M 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action May 1864, Marietta, Georgia
· George Airgood: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, August 15, 1864
· James Albright: Died September 6, 1863, Cincinnati
· Joseph Alexander: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action June 1864
· 2nd Lt Alexander Allison: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 5, 1863
· Sgt. George Allison: Co. K 56th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 23, 1864
· James Allison: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 23, 1864
· Corporal John Allison: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Sergeant David Alspach: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Died August 14, 1861, Portsmouth, Rhode Island
· George Anspach, Co. A 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry
· John Armstrong: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died in Washington, November 12, 1862
· Jacob Arnold: Co. D 28th Pennsylvania
· Charles Aurand: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died in Pottsville February 9, 1865
· Philip Baddorff: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died June 8, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· Clarence Bailey: Co. E 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Wm. Bambrick: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 12, 1862
· Isaac Bannon: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died July 26, 1864, Alexandria, Virginia
· Daniel D. Barnett: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· Albert Bartolet: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Lewis Beableheimer: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 26, 1864
· Sergeant Thedore Beck: Co. D 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died January 17, 1865
· William Becker: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died November 9, 1862, Hagerstown, Maryland
· C. Phillip Beckman: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died February 9, 1865, Baltimore
· Isaac Beltz: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, August 10, 1864
· Jacob Benedict: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Capt. Horace Bennett: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, October 22, 1862, Pocataligo, South Carolina
· John S. Bennett: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Died October 11, 1864, Andersonville Prison
· Abraham Benscoter: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 12, 1864, Spotsylvania
· J. Bensinger: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died January 15, 1864, Savannah, Georgia
· Conrad Berdel: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 8, 1862
· Thomas Bergen: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 26, 1862, Washington, D.C.
· George Betz: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 17, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· James Betz: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Henry H. Bickley: Co. E 10th New Jersey; Died of Wounds Received in Action, August 23, 1864
· Christian Bidel: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 15, 1862
· S. Bishop: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 27, 1864, Andersonville Prison, Georgia
· Sgt. James Black: Co. B 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, May 1864, Marietta, Georgia
· John Black: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 29, 1863
· Michael Bleckle: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 4, 1861, Alexandria, Virginia
· 1st Sergeant Michael Boland: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· Frederick Boltz: Co. F 184th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 10, 1864
· James Boner: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 22, 1864
· Alexander Boone: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 11, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Daniel Boran: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died February 5, 1865, Washington, D.C.
· Thomas Boran: Co. B 6th Pennsylvania Reserves; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Corporal William Bowers: Co. K 56th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 1864
· John Bowler: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 7, 1865, Pottsville
· Daniel Boyer: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, October 5, 1864, Pegram’s Farm,
· George Boyer: Co. F 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died September 30, 1864, Andersonville Prison
· Peter Boyer: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Died October 22, 1862, Cressona
· Wesley Boyer: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· John Bradley: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 1864
· James Brassington: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 7, 1864
· George W. Bratton: Co. G 15th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died March 5, 1863, Murfreesboro, Tennessee
· James Brennan: Co. A 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· William Brennan: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· William Brerton: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 12, 1861, Fort Clarke, North Carolina
· George Bright: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died January 1863, Philadelphia
· John Broadbent: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 17, 1862, Antietam
· John Brobst: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died 9/17/1862 of Wounds Received in Action at 2nd Bull Run
· Simon Brobst: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 24, 1862
· 2nd Lt. David B. Brown: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 5, 1864, Petersburg
· William H.H. Brown: 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died October 29, 1863
· Louis A. Bruns: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 5, 1864, Wilderness
· Andrew Bucher: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Peter Burke: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 14, 1862, Frederick
· Henry Burnish: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 20, 1862, Pottsville
· Lieutenant Thomas Burns: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action near Winchester
· Charles Burton: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 8, 1862, Harrison’s Landing
· Jefferson Byerle: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 17, 1864, Petersburg
· Chris. Cammersel: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Daniel Campbell: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 14, 1864
· Thomas Campbell: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 23, 1862, Pottsville
· Sergeant Francis Canfield: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· James Canfield: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 14, 1862, Point Lookout
· Conrad Carl: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· John Carr: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 19, 1862, Bukettsville, Maryland
· Sgt. Dennis Carroll: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania: Died of Wounds Received in Action, August 3, 1862
· Michael Carroll: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died January 6, 1863, Pottsville
· William Casey: 81st Pennsylvania; Died June 1862, Yorktown, Virginia
· Charles Chaundy: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Died June 1862, New Hampton, New York
· Joseph Chester: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 24, 1864, Fredericksburg
· John Clarey: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, October 12, 1862
· Charles Clark: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died in Annapolis, Maryland
· John Clark: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 8, 1864
· Lieutenant George Byron Clayton: 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died July 6, 1863
· John Coalts: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· Jno. Coffield: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died November 11, 1864, Richmond
· John C. Cole: 43rd United States Colored Troops; Killed in Action, August 1864, Petersburg
· John Collins: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died January 13, 1863
· Thomas Connell: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 18, 1862
· Michael Connery: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· Charles Henry Cook: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died January 17, 1864
· William Corby: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 3, 1863, Cold Harbor
· S. Cover: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 1, 1862, Richmond
· Lieutenant O’Neal Coyle: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 22, 1862, Point Lookout
· Michael Crintin: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 29, 1864, Salisbury Prison, North Carolina
· Gabriel Crow: Co. G 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Lieutenant William Cullen: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 17, 1862, Antietam
· Martin Dacy: Co. B 6th Pennsylvania Reserves; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Joseph Dale: 52nd Pennsylvania
· John Danagh: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 30, 1864, Pegram’s Farm
· Edward Daniels: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 1, 1862, Alexandria
· Thomas Davidson: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 28, 1861, Fort Clarke, North Carolina
· Corporal David J. Davis: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· John Davis: United States Navy; Died December 1862
· Robert Davis: Co. K 76th Pennsylvania; Died June 1862
· Thomas Davis: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 18, 1864, Petersburg
· Corporal Henry Deets: Co. F 50th Pennsylvania; Died March 12, 1863, Washington, D.C.
· Elijah DeFrehn: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 30, 1864, Salisbury Prison, North Carolina
· Jesse DeFrehn: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died May 30, 1863, White Oak Church, Virginia
· Jacob Deiter: Co. I 101st Pennsylvania
· John Deitrich: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died March 22, 1864
· John Deitz: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Phil. DeLaney: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died April 26, 1863
· Corporal Jeremiah Delay: Co. H 81st Pennsylvania; Killed in Action
· Cpl. Wm. H. Delcamp: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 7, 1864
· Corporal George Delker: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Charles DeLong: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died May 8, 1864, Bristoe Station, Virginia
· George Dentzer: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 17, 1862, Antietam
· John Dentzer: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 28, 1864, Petersburg
· James Devine: 32nd Tennessee; Died of Wounds Received in Action
· Simon Devlin: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June18, 1864, Petersburg
· Philip Diehl: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 3, 1861, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
· Charles Dintinger: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Died February 11, 1865, Salisbury Prison, North Carolina
· Michael Divine: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1863, Fredericksburg
· Patrick Divine: Captain Richards’s Cavalry; Killed in Action, April 1862, Fredericksburg
· Frank Dolan: 69th New York; Died of Wounds Received in Action, January 13, 1863
· Thomas Dolan: Co. F 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died of Wounds Received in Action, December 1862, Tennessee
· Patrick Dollard: Co. H 31st Pennsylvania (2nd Reserves)
· John Donnelly: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died April 21, 1864, Annapolis, Maryland
· William Donnelly: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· Patrick Doolin: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Corporal J.H. Dorr: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died January 1863, Washington, D.C.
· Henry Dorward: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 1864
· John Doughtery: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 23, 1862, Hagerstown, Maryland
· Lt. John Doughtery: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Charles Dreisbach: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania
· George Dresh: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 1864, Cold Harbor
· Marcus Drew: Captain Jones’s Guard; Died October 2, 1862
· Mark Drifoos: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 23, 1861, Washington, D.C.
· Samuel Dunlap: Co. F 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died 1862, Tennessee
· Lieutenant J.A. Dunston: Co. C 105th Pennsylvania; Died August 26, 1863, Gettysburg
· Emmanuel Eckert: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Henry Eckler: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Died June 21, 1862, Pine Grove, Pennsylvania
· Edward Edwards: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died April 23, 1864, Annapolis
· James Edwards: Co. B 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· 1st Lt. Joseph Edwards: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 2, 1864
· Henry J. Ege: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action May 12, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Isaac Eiler: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 7, 1862, New York
· 1st Lieutenant Ernst Ellrich: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· John Eplin: 132nd Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Christian Ernst: 11th Pennsylvania Reserves
· Emmanuel Esterheld: Co. K 76th Pennsylvania
· J. Evans: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died March 3, 1863, Washington, D.C.
· William Evans: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died June 22, 1864, Philadelphia
· Edward Eveland: Co. E 28th Pennsylvania; Died May 10, 1863, Aquia Creek
· Daniel Evert: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Solomon Eyster: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 22, 1864, Philadelphia
· John Farne: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, November 8, 1862
· James Farrall: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died September 25, 1862, Washington, D.C.
· John Farrell: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Lawrence Farrel: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Patrick Farrell: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Died September 21, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· Emmanuel Faust: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, Campbell’s Station, Tennessee, November 16, 1863
· Henry Faust: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Patrick Fay, Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, October 22, 1862
· Cpl. J. Felterman: Co. G 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Daniel Fenstermacher: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died February 11, 1863, Washington, D.C.
· Patrick Ferns: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· Sergeant Joseph Ferree: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Joseph Fessler: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Capt. Henry A.M. Filbert: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action , August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Sergeant Roland D. Filbert: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Amos Fisher: Co. A 88th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 1864
· Samuel Fisher: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Corporal John Flanaakers: Co. K 56th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 1864
· Sergeant James Fleming: Co. I 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry, Killed in Action, Big Shanty, Georgia
· Corporal Lewis V. Focht: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 17, 1862, Antietam
· Abe Forrer: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 7, 1862, New Bern, North Carolina
· Joseph Foster: Co. D 5th Wisconsin
· Corporal William Fowler: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Died April 2, 1864, Beaufort, South Carolina
· Lieutenant Alexander Fox: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 1, 1861, Fortress Monroe
· Captain William Fox: Co. K 127th Virginia; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Martin Foyle: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· Valentine Frantz: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died April 28, 1864, Fort Albany, New York
· Corporal A.T. Frazier: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Died October 14, 1862, Alexandria, Virginia
· Sergeant William Freast, Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Peter Fries: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Henry Fry: Co. I 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry
· William Fulton: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died February 11, 1865, Salisbury Prison, North Carolina
· Anthony Gallagher: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 18, 1864, Petersburg
· Lewis Garber: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died April 23, 1862, Annapolis, Maryland
· Sergeant William T. Garrett: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 23, 1861, Fortress Monroe
· Samuel Gaskins: Died September 18, 1864
· Charles Getighe: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died July 24, 1862
· Barney Getler: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· James Gillespie: Co. A 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, December 1862, Murfreesboro, Tennessee
· Joseph Gilmour: Major 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 9, 1864, Georgetown
· Patrick Glennon: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 20, 1862, Hagerstown, Maryland
· Elijah Gloss: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 25, 1862, Alexandria
· Levi Gloss: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· James Golles: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 1864
· Corporal James Gough: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Corporal Alexander Govan: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 23, 1864
· George W. Gowen: Colonel 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg, Virginia
· 1st Lieutenant Henry C. Graeff: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died March 26, 1865, Pottsville
· Arthur Gray: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 17, 1864, Petersburg
· Lieutenant George Gressang: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 12, 1862
· Stephen Gross: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 12, 1862, Fortress Monroe, Virginia
· Thomas Haines: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Jonas Haldeman: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action November 29, 1863, Knoxville
· Joseph Halderman: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 1864, Washington, D.C.
· John Haley: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 15, 1862
· John Haley: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 26, 1862, Philadelphia
· John Haley, Jr.: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1862, Spotsylvania
· Michael Haley: Co. K 56th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 19, 1864, Petersburg
· John W. Hall: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 1, 1862, Harrison’s Landing
· Corporal Patrick Handley: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania, Died October 25, 1862, Washington, D.C.
· Corporal Frank Hanley: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 29, 1862, Bakersville, Maryland
· Henry Hanley: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 1862
· John T. Hannum: Adjutant 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 1864
· Edward Harner: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Jacob Harrill: Co. K 56th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 1864
· Henry Harris: 36th Pennsylvania (7th Reserves); Killed in Action
· Henry Harrison: Battery A 5th Pennsylvania Artillery; Killed in Action
· Corporal Albert Hartline: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, 5/3/1863, Chancellorsville
· John T. Hazzard: Co. L 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died February 16, 1863, Annapolis
· Samuel Heckman: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 12, 1864
· Henry Hehn: 9th Pennsylvania
· Cpl. J.B. Heiser: Co. H 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, December 23, 1864, Gordonsville, Virginia
· James Heiser: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 30, 1864
· Corporal John Heisler: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Joseph Heisler: Co. A 129th Pennsylvania; Died January 1863
· Jeremiah Helms: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 27, 1862
· Michael Henegan: Co. K 52nd Pennsylvania; Killed in Action
· P. Heneran: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 25, 1864
· John W. Henn: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Jacob Henry: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 7, 1864
· Ord. Sgt. George S. Herring: Co. H 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, December 23, 1864, Gordonsville, Virginia
· Charles Hesser: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died July 8, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· Charles F. Hesser: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania
· Lewis Hessinger: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 22, 1864, Petersburg
· Edward Hetherington: Battery I 2nd Pennsylvania Artillery; Died September 20, 1864, David Island Hospital, New York
· James Higley: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania
· Cpl. John H. Higley: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, August 21, 1863, Point Lookout, Maryland
· James Hill: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died July 24, 1864
· William Hill: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Orderly Sergeant William Hill: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Sgt. Charles Hinkle: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 23, 1861, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
· Job Hirst: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 3, 1864
· Sergeant Charles F. Hoffman: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 31, 1863, Pottsville
· Barth. Hoffy: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Jos. T. Holdeman: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, August 24, 1864
· Michael Hollahan: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 22, 1862, Burketsville, Maryland
· John Holman: Co. E 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Sergeant John Homer: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· Corporal William Hopkins: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Sgt. Thomas Houck: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 8, 1863, Pottsville
· Sergeant Silas Hough: 5th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865
· David Houser: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died July 1864, City Point Hospital
· Henry Hoy: 107th Pennsylvania; Died April 2, 1865
· James Hughes: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· Matthew Hume: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Lt. William Hume: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 30, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· John J. Huntzinger: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· 2nd Lt. Henry Clay Jackson: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 12, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Adam James: Co. M 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, May 1864, Marietta, Georgia
· Thomas H. James: 1st New York Cavalry; Killed in Action, October 3, 1864, Berryville, Virginia
· Alva F. Jeffries: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 17, 1862, Antietam
· Corporal Henry Jenkins: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· James Jenkins: Battery F 5th United States Artillery; Died November 1862
· R. A. Jenkins: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 24, 1862, Washington, D.C.
· Sergeant Benjamin Franklin Jones: Co. I 52nd Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, Fair Oaks, Virginia
· Cpl. Gomer Jones: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· J. Howard Jones: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 13, 1864
· John Jones: Co. B 55th Pennsylvania; Died August 26, 1864
· John M. Jones: Co. A 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Sergeant John R. Jones: Co. I 15th New Jersey; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Joseph Jones: Co. F 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died March 1862, Bardstown, Kentucky
· Wm. A. Jones: Co. F 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died of Wounds Received in Action, December 1862
· James B. Kane: 13th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died January 1863
· Daniel Karcher: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died November 28, 1861, Georgetown
· Jno. Kauffman: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· J.F. Keefer: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Philip Keeley: 107th Pennsylvania; Died April 1, 1865
· Daniel J. Kehl: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died June 26, 1864
· John Kelly: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 10, 1862, New York
· Luke Kelly: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 26, 1864, Palo Alto, Pennsylvania
· Martin Kelly: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Patrick Kelly: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 14, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Thomas Kelly: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Sergeant Francis Kemp: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Patrick Kennedy: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Died February 7, 1862
· Benjamin B. Kershner: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 1864, Cold Harbor
· Lewis Kershner: Co. D 198th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, March 31, 1865, Petersburg
· William Kind: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 2, 1862
· James King: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· Thomas Kinney: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· William Kissinger: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 24, 1864
· Levi D. Kistler: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died September 30, 1862
· William Klass: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Charles Knerr: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 7, 1862
· Frederick Knittle: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Reuben Kline: Co. B 129th Pennsylvania; Died January 8, 1863; Falmouth, Virginia
· Andrew Klock: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died June 30, 1862
· Charles Francis Koch: 25th Michigan; Died April 7, 1863, Bowling Green, Kentucky
· Charles Kolb: Killed in Action, October 19, 1864, Cedar Creek, Virginia
· Henry P. Koons: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Joel Koons: Co. H 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, August 1864
· Lewis W. Kopp: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 1, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· David Krieger: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died September 1862, Washington, D.C.
· William H. Kuhns: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died June 15, 1862, Hanover, Virginia
· William Kutz: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Died February 4, 1862, Alexandria, Virginia
· 2nd Lieutenant Samuel B. Laubenstein: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Jacob Lauby: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 1864, Cold Harbor
· Christian Lauer: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 10, 1864
· Jno. Lawler: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 11, 1863, White Oak Church, Virginia
· Thomas Lawler: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Capt. George Lawrence: Co. A 129th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, January 1, 1863, Fredericksburg
· John Lebo: Co. I 56th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 1864
· Richard Lee: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died March 1864, Pottsville
· John H. Leiser: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Charles F. Leizer: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· George Andrew Lerch: Co. H 129th Pennsylvania; Died November 11, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Corporal William Levison: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, January 1, 1865, Petersburg
· Edward Lewis: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 20, 1864
· Isaac Lewis: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 17, 1864, Petersburg
· Lewis Lewis: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Died April 2, 1864, Hampton Hospital, Virginia
· Thomas Lewis: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died April 2, 1864, Philadelphia
· Peter Litchfield: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died June 1864
· Thomas Lloyd: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· William D. Lloyd: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died January 19, 1865, Washington, D.C.
· Sgt. Peter Longwell: Co. B 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, May 1864, Marietta, Georgia
· Joseph Lorr: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Company C 48th Pennsylvania; Died October 29, 1862, Alexandria, Virginia
· Samuel McAffee: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania: Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Patrick McAllister: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Edward McCabe: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 12, 1862, Washington, D.C.
· Henry McCann: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Robert McClelland: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania
· David McCloir: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· Captain Robert McCormick: 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died December 1864, Bardstown, Kentucky
· Edward McDonough: Died July 23, 1862
· Thomas McEvoy: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Died January 14, 1862, Camp Winfield, North Carolina
· Hugh McFadden: Co. B 56th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 1864
· Patrick McGee: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died September 25, 1863, Philadelphia
· John McGovern: Killed in Action, Yorktown, Virginia
· Patrick McLaughlin: Co. F 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, May 1864, Marietta, Georgia
· Barney McMichael: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Samuel McMinnzie: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Michael McNamara: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Albert Mack: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· John Mackey: Co. I 50th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 4, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· William Madara: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· John Madison: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died July 23, 1862, Harrison’s Landing, Virginia
· George F. Maines: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania: Died November 30, 1862, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
· 1st Sergeant Robert Maingay: Co. D 118th Pennsylvania; Died November 24, 1862, Falmouth
· John Major: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 17, 1864, Petersburg
· Thomas Major: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died October 31, 1862, Washington, D.C.
· John Maley: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action
· William Mangold: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 25, 1864, Philadelphia
· Israel Manning: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 1864
· John D. Manning: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Died April 14, 1864, Annapolis, Maryland
· Alexander Martin: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 6, 1862, Harrison’s Landing, Virginia
· Lewis J. Martin: Major 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Thomas Marshall: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 25, 1864
· Alonzo Martz: Co. I 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died April 13, 1864, Camp Curtin, Harrisburg
· Josiah Matthews: Co. F 109th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 25, 1864, Dallas, Georgia
· Samuel Martz: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Sergeant William Mayberry: Co.E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· William H. Medlar: 81st Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, Fredericksburg
· John S. Meredith: Co. H 137th Pennsylvania; Died March 11, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· John Merrill: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 29, 1863, Warrenton, Virginia
· John Menear: Co. E 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died May 11, 1862
· Albert Meyer: 9th New York; Died December 25, 1861, Baltimore
· John Michael: Co. E 129th Pennsylvania; Died January 6, 1863
· Aaron Miller: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 20, 1862
· Benjamin Miller: 6th United States Cavalry
· Charles Miller: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· David Miller: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 6, 1864, Annapolis, Maryland
· Jeremiah Miller: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, January 2, 1863
· John H. Miller: Co. L 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died May 8, 1862, Yorktown, Virginia
· William Miller: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 26, 1861, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
· William Millett: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died September 7, 1861, Harrisburg
· Thomas Millington: Co. A 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Michael Mohan: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 20, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· Corporal Edward Monckler: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died July 17, 1862, Baltimore
· John Mor: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 26, 1862
· George W. Morey: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 17, 1864, Petersburg
· John Morrissy: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· John J. Morrison: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, October 23, 1862, Washington, D.C.
· John Morton: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died September 5, 1862, Alexandria
· Corporal Daniel Moser: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 17, 1862, Antietam
· Sergeant Emmanuel Moyer: Co. H 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, August 1864
· Laurentus C. Moyer: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Solomon Moyer: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· James Mulholland: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 17, 1864, Petersburg
· Archibald Muller: Co. K 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, May 1864, Marietta, Georgia
· Sergeant John F. Mundy: Co. F 109th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 25, 1864, Dallas, Georgia
· Sgt. James Murray: Co. H 81st Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 25, 1864, Weldon Railroad
· George Nagle: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Died January 9, 1864; Washington, D.C.
· George Nagle: Co. G 107th Pennsylvania
· William Nagle: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Michael Nash: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 19, 1862
· Michael Naus: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 13, 1863, New Baltimore, Virginia
· Daniel Nayer: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 22, 1864, City Point, Virginia
· Cpl. Charles Newton: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 3, 1863
· John Nicholas: Co. A 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· John C. Niese: Co. B 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· William Nixon: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania
· Corporal Charles Norrigan: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Chauncey K. Nugent: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 27, 1864
· Hugh B. Nugent: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· Martin O’Brien: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action May 12, 1864, Spotsylvania
· William O’Brien: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Died January 12, 1862
· Tim O’Connor: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 14, 1864
· John O’Donnell: Co. H 81st Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, July 1, 1862
· Daniel Okon: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 1864
· B.G. Otto: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, October 15, 1862
· Isaac Otto: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Peter Otto: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· George W. Overbeck: Co. G 8th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died November 2, 1862
· Patrick Owens: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 21, 1861, Pottsville
· John Padden: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Died October 17, 1861, Harrisburg
· George H. Payne: Co. H 129th Pennsylvania; Died December 25, 1862, Falmouth, Virginia
· Samuel Petit: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Augustus Pfaltzgraf: Band 96th Pennsylvania
· Martin Pike: Co. D 41st Pennsylvania (12th Reserves)
· Sergeant William Place: Co. E 72nd Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 17, 1862, Antietam
· Amos Poff: Co. F 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry
· 1st Lt. Curtis C. Pollock: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 23, 1864
· Lieutenant W.K. Pollock: 1st United States Artillery; Died August 4, 1863, Beaufort, North Carolina
· Degenhart C. Pott: 112th Pennsylvania; Died March 10, 1864
· Corporal John Powell: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 12, 1864
· William Price: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 1864, Cold Harbor
· William W. Price: Co. G 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Alexander Prince: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 18, 1862, Antietam
· William Henry Pritchard: Co. E 78th Pennsylvania; Died October 31, 1862, Nashville, Tennessee
· Thomas Probert: Co. B 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Edward G. Pugh: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 23, 1864
· Frank Queeney: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 30, 1862
· Charles Quinn: Died of Wounds Received in Action, 1864
· George Rahn: Co. A 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry
· Jonas Z. Raber: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania
· George Ramer: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 6, 1862
· Thomas K. Rausch: Co. C 2nd Iowa; Killed in Action, August 20, 1864, Atlanta, Georgia
· Thomas Rease: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· William Reasons: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania, Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 23, 1864, Annapolis, Maryland
· Edward Reber: Co. B 129th Pennsylvania; Died January 12, 1863, Falmouth, Virginia
· Lt. Francis M. Reed: Co. L 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, June 27, 1863, Duck River, Tennessee
· John Reed: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 3, 1862, Fort Wood, New York
· John Reed: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Sergeant Joseph Reed: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, November 16, 1863, Campbell Station, Tennessee
· Joshua Reed: Died May 18, 1865
· Daniel E. Reedy: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 1864
· L.M. Reese: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· James Regan: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 23, 1864, Annapolis, Maryland
· Daniel Reighard: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Died November 11, 1861, Camp Hamilton, Virginia
· Simon Reigle: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Henry Reinhart: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 23, 1863, White Oak Church, Virginia
· George Rice: Co. K 67th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 1864
· 1st Sergeant Joseph Rich: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· Nathan Rich: Co. K 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 17, 1864, Petersburg
· Samuel Burkhart Richland, Jr.: Co. G 173rd Pennsylvania; Died February 12, 1863, Norfolk, Virginia
· August Richter: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died September 1, 1862, Fort Wood, New York
· Michael Riley: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Corporal William Rineaehl: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Killed May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Peter Ritz: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· John Roseberry Roads: Co.M 6th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died October 22, 1863, Durant Station, Iowa
· Reese W. Roberts: Co. L 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry
· Captain James Robertson: Co. I 22nd Iowa, Killed in Action, May 22, 1863, Vicksburg, Mississippi
· Lewis Robinhold: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864, Spotsylvania
· Cpl. Reuben Robinson: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· William Morris Robinson: 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died of Wounds Received in Action, August 21, 1864, Jonesboro, Georgia
· John Robson: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 20, 1862, Sharpsburg
· Alexander Rogers: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· Arter Rogers: Co. C 55th Pennsylvania; Died September 1862, Beaufort, South Carolina
· Patrick Rogers: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died March 25, 1865, Washington, D.C.
· Conrad Romanus: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died September 7, 1862, New York
· John Ruff: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 1862, Washington, D.C.
· John Ryan: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 22, 1862
· Samuel Sager: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Michael Sands: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 20, 1863, Pottsville
· Corporal Nathan Santee: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 8, 1862
· McCoy Sargeant: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 27, 1862
· Thomas Scanlan: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Corporal James Schofield: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Samuel Schollenberger: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died January 15, 1865, Salisbury Prison, North Carolina
· Lucian Schwartz: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania
· William Schwartz: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died June 26, 1864
· Daniel Schwenk: Co. N 28th Pennsylvania; Died October 1861
· Addison Seaman: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died July 16, 1862
· Joseph L. Seiders: Co. I 118th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action
· John Sentman: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· John W. Sennett: Co. B 53rd Pennsylvania; Died December 12, 1864, Salisbury Prison, North Carolina.
· James Sexton: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Franklin Sharer: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Mattie Sheafer: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 4, 1862
· James Shields: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died February 26, 1864, Silver Creek, Pennsylvania
· William Shissler: 8th Michigan; Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 7, 1862
· Nicholas Shitehour: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, January 1863, Washington
· Cornelius Shovelin: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 17, 1862, White Oak Church, Virginia
· Capt. Benjamin B. Shuck: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 27, 1864
· Nelson Simons: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died July 5, 1864, Minersville
· Henry Simpson: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action
· Henry C. Simpson: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· William Simpson: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 23, 1864, Shady Grove Church
· Martin Sipe: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Corporal John H. Slingluff: Co. A 138th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action May 6, 1864, Wilderness
· Alexander Smith: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· George Smith: Co. E 147th Pennsylvania; Died July 21, 1863, Milford, Delaware
· Sergeant Harrison K. Smith: Co. K 56th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, July 1863, Gettysburg
· Hugh Smith: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died January 8, 1863, Washington
· William Smith: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 23, 1864, Shady Grove Church
· William Smith: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania: Died of Wounds Received in Action, September 14, 1862
· William H. Smith: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died April 7, 1864, Annapolis, Maryland
· Frederick Snyder: Co. E 151st Pennsylvania Died May 11, 1863, Wind Mill Point Hospital, Virginia
· Joseph Snyder: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 8, 1862, Burkettsville, Maryland
· Simon Snyder: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 16, 1864
· John Southam: Died August 1862, Helena, Arkansas
· Andrew Spear: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died April 15, 1862, New Bern, North Carolina
· James R. Spencer: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 31, 1864
· William Sponsaler: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Died May 20, 1862, Baltimore
· Corporal John Sponslor: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, November 29, 1863, Knoxville, Tennessee
· John Spreese: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died January 21, 1862, Hatteras Island, North Carolina
· John Springer: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, October 3, 1862
· Abel. C.T. St. Clair: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· John H. Stedham: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 12, 1864, Spotsylvania
· William Steel, Co. A 124th Illinois; Died August 7, 1863, Vicksburg, Mississippi
· Henry Sterner: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Died August 12, 1862, Point Lookout, Maryland
· Francis M. Stidham: Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 1864, Annapolis, Maryland
· John Stodd: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Captain Thomas Stodd: Died March 11, 1864
· George Stone: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Henry Stonefield: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· William C. Stookey: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 5, 1862
· Horace Straub: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 17, 1864, Petersburg
· Elias Strasser: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died May 9, 1862
· Henry Stubbelbine: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 2, 1863
· Nathaniel Stutzman: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Died May 22, 1864, Washington
· John Sullivan: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, October 8, 1862
· Thomas Sullivan: Co. D 107th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 17, 1862, Antietam
· Edward Sweeney: Died August 25, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· David F. Thiel: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action May 1864
· Capt. Edward Thomas: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, May 14, 1864
· Evan Thomas: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· William Thompson: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 18, 1862
· Charles Timmons: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action September 17, 1862, Antietam
· James E. Tobin: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 9, 1862, Fairfax, Virginia
· James N. Tobin: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died January 17, 1862, Glen Carbon, Pennsylvania
· Sergeant Thomas Tosh: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 7, 1864, Washington, D.C.
· D. Towney: Co. A 50th Pennsylvania; Died September 1862, Washington, D.C.
· Oliver G. Treichler: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action September 14, 1862 South Mountain
· Charles Treisbach: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died July 1, 1862, New Bern, North Carolina
· Frank Treon: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Philip Troy: Co. H 17th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action, August, 1864
· George Uhl: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· Jonas Vanderslice: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, July 16, 1864, Philadelphia
· Otto G.H. Vogel: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Anthony Wade: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 8, 1864
· Abraham Wadsworth: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 18, 1862, Port Carbon, PA
· Sergeant Benjamin B. Wagner: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Jacob Wagner: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died January 3, 1865, Pottsville
· Levan J. Warner: Co. C 50th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Daniel Wary: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Reuben Watt: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died March 31, 1864, Annapolis
· Charles Weaver: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, December 5, 1863, Knoxville, Tennessee
· Charles E. Weber: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died December 5, 1863, Knoxville, Tennessee
· Joseph Weise: Co. H 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, November 27, 1863, Knoxville, Tennessee
· John Weiser: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 29, 1862, 2nd Bull Run
· Theodore Weiser: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· George Welsh: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Died February 6, 1865, Salisbury Prison, North Carolina
· John Welsh: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 20, 1864
· Corporal R. Welsh: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 27, 1862, Gaines’ Mill
· William Welsh: Co. A 67th Pennsylvania; Died January 4, 1862
· Frank Wentzel: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 12, 1862
· Andrew Werner: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 1864
· Lieutenant Edward Wertley: Co. H 129th Pennsylvania; Died November 30, 1862
· Charles Wessner: Co. K 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 5, 1863, Sharpsburg, Maryland
· Bernard West: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died May 1, 1862, New Bern, North Carolina
· Joseph Whelan: Co. F 96th Pennsylvania; Died March 25, 1862
· John Whitaker: Co. C 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 23, 1864, Petersburg
· William Wicklam: Co. I 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Daniel Wiehry: Co. L 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed in Action
· Frank Wiehry: Killed in Action
· Isiah Wilbur: Co. K 56th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, August 1864
· A. Wilkes: Co. B 96th Pennsylvania; Died June 30, 1864, Savannah, Georgia
· David Williams: Co. E 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, June 1, 1864, Cold Harbor
· James Williams: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· John Williams: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Richard Williams: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Samuel Williams: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died December 17, 1862
· Thomas D. Williams: Co. D 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Thomas G. Williams: Co. B 48th Pennsylvania; Died August 1862
· William Williams: Co. G 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· 1st Lieutenant William D. Williams: Co. F 184th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 8, 1864
· Henry Williamson: Co. D 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, December 13, 1862, Fredericksburg
· Jerry Willouer: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 22, 1864
· James Wolfinger: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died July 7, 1862 Hill Cates Farm, Virginia
· William Woodring: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Lewis Woods: Co. F 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 1864
· Asher Woomer: Co. E 129th Pennsylvania; Died March 1863
· Frank Workman: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania: Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Joseph Workman: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Died June 9, 1864
· Corporal Josh Workman: Co. G 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· William R. Wren: Co. K 19th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died April 22, 1865, Jefferson Barracks Hospital, Missouri
· Jacob Wright: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Lieutenant Nicholas Wynkoop: 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Killed August 21, 1862, Gallatin, Tennessee
· George Yinchell: Co. E 55th Pennsylvania; Died January 15, 1865, Salisbury Prison, North Carolina
· Alexander Yost: Co. C 96th Pennsylvania; Died September 12, 1862, Fort Wood, New York
· Joseph Yost: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Died October 29, 1863, Warrenton, Virginia
· Nicholas Yost: Co. A 96th Pennsylvania; Died of Wounds Received in Action, June 7, 1864
· Charles B. Zeigler: Co. H 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, September 14, 1862, South Mountain
· Sergeant William Zigler: Co. E 96th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action, May 10, 1864, Spotsylvania
· Albert Zimmerman: Co. I 48th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action April 2, 1865, Petersburg
· David Zimmerman: Co. E 129th Pennsylvania; Killed in Action May 3, 1863, Chancellorsville
· Joseph Zimmerman: Co. F 7th Pennsylvania Cavalry; Died November 29, 1862, Nashville
· Peter Zimmerman: Co. A 48th Pennsylvania; Died March 1864, Annapolis, Maryland

Sunday, May 27, 2007

Nicholas Mitsock: 1927-1957

Today, Sunday, May 27, 2007, marks the 50th year since my grandfather, Nicholas Mitsock, was killed in a mine collapse. I regret to say that I don't know that much about him. He was a first generation American, was a good baseball player and dancer, and served in World War II. Like many in Schuylkill County, he found work in the coal mines. On May 27, 1957, he headed off to work as he would have any other day but shortly after entering the mines that morning, an explosion collapsed the walls and my grandfather, with a few others, was trapped. He was only 29 years old. With my 29th birthday coming up in September, it's hard to believe that my grandfather was so young when he died. He left behind a widow, my grandmother Baba, and five children, including my mom, who was six years old when her dad was killed. Of course, I never did get a chance to meet him but still I have missed him. I suppose we would be planning his 80th Birthday Party this year if he were still around.

Coal Miner's Statue, Minersville, Pennsylvania

Tuesday, May 22, 2007

PROFILES: Captain James K. Helms, Co. D



James Kellerson Helms, the son of Peter & Lucy Helms, was born on June 11, 1841, in Myerstown, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania. The family moved to Philadelphia, where James was educated at the public schools. Then, in 1857, the family settled in Schuylkill Haven, in southern Schuylkill County. Here James found work as a teacher. He was two months shy of his twentieth birthday when the American Civil War began in April 1861. Like many of the young men from Schuylkill Haven, Helms volunteered his services, and shortly after the commencement of hostilities, he was mustered in as a private in the 6th Pennsylvania Volunteers. The 6th PA was a three-month unit that spent its time in the Shenandoah Valley, under the command of General Robert Patterson. After Helms's three-month enlistment expired in late July, he signed up to serve in Company D, 48th Pennsylvania. Mustered in as a sergeant, Helms proved to be a very good soldier. He stood 5'7" in height, had a fair complexion, dark eyes, and light hair. Helms fought bravely at 2nd Bull, South Mountain, and Antietam in the late summer of 1862. During the latter battle, Helms was informed that his younger brother, Jeremiah Helms, the drummer for Company C, 50th PA, had fallen seriously wounded. James made his way to the Sherrick House where his brother was being cared for. There was nothing to be done, however, and young Jeremiah passed away on September 24, 1862, at the age of 16, one of the youngest casualties at Antietam. Jeremiah enlisted against his parents' wishes, and despite being mustered in as the company drummer, he was known to set his drum down, pick up a musket, and march along with the advanced ranks. James's father, Peter Helms, traveled to the Antietam battlefield to retrieve the body of his son, Jeremiah.
Peter Helms
Father of Capt. James K. Helms, 48th PA & Pvt. Jeremiah Helms, 50th PA

The Miners' Journal, Schuylkill County's leading newspaper, recounted the sad events in its October 12, 1862, issue:
On last Tuesday a week, Jeremiah Helms, the youngest son of Mr. Peter Helms of Schuylkill Haven, and a member of Company C, 50th regiment, P.V. was interred at Myerstown, Lebanon County, his former residence, in the presence of a large concourse of mourners and friends. . . .His father brought the Corpse home from the late battlefield of Antietam, where he was mortally wounded on the 17th ult. while nobly battling with the enemy in defense of those dear rights which every freeman should enjoy. He was shot through the head with a Minie ball in line of the eyes. He was perfectly sensible for the first seven days of his suffering, and able to walk about. Thus he lingered, with out a murmur, bearing his pain like a true soldier, with Christian fortitude, until the morning of the 27th, only the day previous to his father's arrival, when he breathed his last and became another victim of this cursed Rebellion and sacrifices at the star of his country's choicest blessing, liberty & freedom. He fell a noble hero martyr to the cause he so much loved to defend. His comrades bear testimony of his soldierly conduct, always cheerful and prompt in performance of his duty. He fought well at the battles of Pocataligo, S.C., Bull Run, Chantilly, Va., and South Mountain and Antietam, Md. He prevailed for some time upon his parents to go to war: they could not at first consent to his going on account of his youth, but seeing that he was fired a zeal of patriotism that was pure and noble, permission was given. . . .He is the youngest of three brothers, all of whom have enlisted in defense of the Union, at the respective ages of 16, 18, and 20 years. After the battle of Bull Run he was heard in earnest prayer, upon bended knees in his tent. In his last letter, which was after the battle of South Mountain, he wrote his parents not to feel uneasy about him, that he was fighting for the Lord, as well as for the protection of the Star and Stripes. . . .His brother James, who is a member of the 48th P.V. visited him during his suffering, when he told him that [James] should return to his regiment and do valiant service, that he was beyond recovery. He also told his nurse the same, Morgan Pugh of Minersville, and that by his kind and unceasing attentions towards him he (Pugh) only prolonged his suffering, as he could not recover. He seems to have been resigned to his fate, and satisfied to die as a proud defender of his insulted country.
After the death of his brother, James did indeed return to his regiment. He fought at Fredericksburg, and throughout the 1863 campaigns in Kentucky and Tennessee. Throughout his time in the 48th, Helms advanced through the ranks, being promoted to 2nd lieutenant, and the to 1st lieutenant. Surviving the slaughter at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, and Cold Harbor, James Helms was seriously wounded in the leg in June 1864 at Petersburg. He was sent home to recover. It would prove to be a long convalescence and the wound would never completely heal. He was discharged on a surgeon's certificate on October 19, 1864. On July 22, 1864, during his recovery, Helms was promoted to the rank Captain, in recognition of his gallantry and good service.
James Helms spent the remaining years of his life in Schuylkill Haven. He married Amanda Kantner and soon began a family. A photograph of three of Helms's children follows:
He was elected as a Justice of the Peace, and held this position until his death. He served on the borough council and was a member of the local school board. Helms also remained active in veteran's affairs, and on February 8, 1867, founded the Jere K. Helms Post 26 of the Grand Army of the Republic, in honor of his younger brother, who was mortally wounded five years earlier at Antietam. He also served as the National and State President of the Patriotic Orders Sons of America.
James K. Helms died on July 23, 1893, at just fifty-two years of age. He was buried in Schuylkill Haven's Union Cemetery.


Several years ago, The Patriotic Order, Sons of America, published Captain James Helms's Civil War Diaries. Copies can be obtained by contacting the P.O.S. of America, Research & Service Center, Valley Forge, PA 19481.

{The Miners' Journal article on the death and burial ofJeremiah Helms is found in Stu Richards's great book on Company C, 50th Pennsylvania Infantry}

Friday, May 18, 2007

Every Now & Then. . .

. . .I stop to realize just how lucky I am. Please forgive a little indulgence here, and please forgive me (again) for going off the topic of this blog, but this Sunday, May 20, 2007, will mark one year since one of my lifelong dreams came true. I remember the day perfectly well. May 20 already had a special place in my heart, for it was on this day, way back in 2000, that I graduated from Kutztown University and received my bachelor's degree in History. But May 20, 2006, was even more memorable. . .
The story, however, begins a long time ago, when I was a kid, maybe five or six years old. That year--I guess it was 1983 or 1984--my family and I took a trip to Gettysburg, and from this visit, I was instantly fascinated with the American Civil War. It was immediate. Over the next several years, I outfitted myself in a costume, reenacted great battles behind my house, collected little plastic soldiers, set up vast dioramas, and waged massive engagements using either my finger to track the trajectories of the imaginary bullets or rubber bands. Casualties were severe. I also read constantly. I remember reading, over and over again, the classic "Golden Book" of the Civil War, and paging through Bruce Catton's many works, even if I couldn't really understand it all. I also remember getting the Gettysburg edition of the Time-Life Series on the Civil War, and receiving a new volume every two months. I believe the bindings of all these books, which I still have, are completely worn and broken from overuse. As I got a little older, my family would take me on trips to Gettysburg (we must have made this two-hour drive at least three times a year), Antietam, Manassas, Fredericksburg, Spotsylvania, Richmond, Petersburg, and even Appomattox. I still remember these vacations as if they took place just last year. I always came away from these trips thinking just how awesome it would be a Park Ranger at a Civil War Battlefield. I looked up to the rangers as the preservers of history, as the interpreters and great story tellers of the Civil War, and I remember well programs I heard at Guinea Station where Stonewall Jackson died, and at Chancellorsville (where, as a ten or eleven year old, I developed this instant crush on a red-headed ranger as she recounted the moments leading up to Jackson's mortal wounding), and at Gettysburg, where Ranger Troy Harmon led us on an incredible walk from Seminary Ridge, following in the footsteps of Richard Garnett's Brigade, as they made their way toward that little "copse of trees." Someday, I thought, I will be a Park Ranger at one of these battlefields. . .
I continued to study the Civil War as I got older, and my fascination with the Civil War only continued to grow. I was really easy to shop for...birthday and Christmas presents: books. After high school, I studied history at Kutztown University and, after receiving my bachelor's degree from this institution, I entered Lehigh University and earned a master's in 2003. Even as I studied at these schools, I wrote to many, many different battlefield parks. . .inquiring about jobs or internships, or anything. I must have become a real pain-in-the-neck. But no matter how many letters I wrote, I always got a response. When I got serious about job hunting, I submitted formal applications in response to interpretative openings anywhere in the park service, from Richmond to Antietam, and from Valley Forge to Hopewell Furnace. I literally applied for dozens of openings over the course of nearly a decade. Each time, I received that standard-size white envelope, with that very formal letter inside. . ."Thank you for your interest," it would always begin, "although we have found you qualified for the position. . ." well, you know the rest. I was naturally discouraged each time I got one of these letters, but I wasn't about to give up on my dream. I even kept all these letters (and the envelopes they arrived in) as a source of motivation and inspiration. (See photo below). One day, I kept telling myself, I will pull these letters out and remember what a struggle it was to get a ranger job. . .
Piles of rejection letters. . .
While studying at Lehigh, I was given an adjunct teaching position at a local community college, and I discovered that I really enjoyed teaching. So, instead of pursuing a Ph.D., I decided to enroll at another university and complete an education program. By the next year, I obtained an Instructional I Certificate to teach Social Studies, 9-12, and Citizenship Education, 7-12, in Pennsylvania's public schools. I interviewed for teaching positions in the Lehigh Valley, but in October 2004, my wife and I decided to move to Gettysburg. I still longed for a job as a Park Ranger, and I headed to Gettysburg convinced that I will one-day get in. I continued to write letters (poor Scott Hartwig here in Gettysburg must have gotten half a dozen from me within a two-year period). And each time, I got a reply that further convinced me of the great difficulty in getting into the Park Service. I found work as a full-time, permanent, substitute for a local school district, and even spent a (very long) summer working at one of Gettysburg's reenactor's sutler shops. Shortly after arriving in Gettysburg, I discovered that the Antietam National Battlefield was looking for volunteers, so I put my application in, and in January 2005, I became a volunteer at this awesome park. I worked Saturdays mainly, and got to know the ranger staff very well. But still, things weren't looking good. During my first year in Gettysburg, I received more of those rejection letters, and by the beginning of May, 2006, my wife and I were seriously thinking about moving back to eastern PA. We even found a house that we loved...it was going up for sale at public auction on May 20, and we decided we would go and put in our bid. Yes, May 20.
Now, back in late February 2006 I was told at Antietam that with the retirement of Paul Chiles, there would be a few seasonal interpretative openings. I was encouraged by Christie Stanczak, Keith Snyder, and Alann Schmidt to apply. They each said they would put in a good word for me. So I did, but by this point, I was fully expecting that I would be moving back, and I was fully expecting that I would once again that get infamous letter in the mail. But, in the back of my head, I knew that this would be the best shot I ever had a ranger position.
I was up early as usual on Saturday, May 20, 2006. I brewed a pot of coffee, sat down at my computer to get some work done. We would be leaving around noon for the auction. It was sometime after 10:00 a.m. (10:23 a.m., I think it was) when a knock came at the door. I was reluctant to open it because I was still in my sleeping clothes and my hair was a wreck. But I did, and there stood the mail carrier. She had a Certified Letter, in an 8"x11" manilla envelope. I saw the return address while it was still in her hand: "United States Department of the Interior National Park Service." I could not believe it. I signed for it, but kept it closed for about another half an hour, and thought to myself..."Could this be it? Finally, after all these years?" I poured myself a fresh cup of coffee, and finally mustered up enough courage to open it. . .
"Congratulations," it began, "you have been selected for the position of Park Ranger (Interpretation), GS-0025-05/01, located at Antietam National Battlefield." (See photo below) I was just overcome with so many emotions, that I didn't know what to do. My wife was thrilled for me, of course, but there still the matter with that house. . .We went, and I just kept hoping it would go for a lot of money, more than what we could afford. I was nervous when there were few bidders...then the price went up. I grew more and more relieved, and when the price went way above our limit. . .well, a big sigh.
So, that was May 20, 2006. A day I will never, ever forget. With the one year anniversary of this date fast approaching, I am realizing again just how lucky I am. . .

The Certified Letters with the good news:

A lifelong dream had come true. . .

Sunday, May 13, 2007

Flags of the 48th Pennsylvania


The 48th Pennsylvania Record Banner

One year after the end of the American Civil War, on Independence Day, 1866, the battle flags of Pennsylvania's regiments were returned to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania in an elaborate ceremony that concluded with a memorable parade of the regiments' survivors through the streets of Philadelphia.
Since this day 141 years ago, the flags of Pennsylvania's Civil War regiments have been stored in a state arsenal building, then displayed in a specially-built flag room in the capitol. After this they were transferred to the state's Executive Library and Museum, and then--finally--back to the capitol rotunda. It used to be that you had to travel to Harrisburg, or make a special appointment to view these flags, but not anymore. . .now, it's as simple as a few clicks
Great measures have been taken of late to preserve what remains of these battle flags. You can read all about these steps, and search for the flags of any Pennsylvania regiment by using this website:


The Flags of the 48th Pennsylvania. . .as they appear in 2007. . .are photographed below. Please note that these photographs are copyrighted, PA CPC (Capital Preservation Committee)


This is all that remains of the regiment's 1861 "Pottsville" Flag. . .presented to the 48th in October 1861 by Mr. John T. Werner. It was upon the canton of this flag that was inscribed: "In the Cause of the Union, We Know No Such Word As Fail."
The 48th's first State Flag, presented to the regiment by Gov. Curtin in September 1861.
The second state Flag, carried by the regiment from March 1864-July 1865 The 48th's second National Flag Regimental Flag Flank Marker
Flank Marker



Friday, May 11, 2007

PROFILES: Lieutenant Henry Krebs, Jr.: 48th PA & 35th U.S.C.T.

Henry Krebs, Jr.

It has been a good while since my last 'Profiles' piece, so today I will take a look at Henry Krebs, Jr. With the outbreak of civil war in April 1861, Krebs, a farmer from southern Schuylkill County, enlisted as a private in the 9th Pennsylvania Infantry, a three-month organization that served out its term of service in the lower Shenandoah Valley. Upon his discharge in late July 1861, Krebs re-enlisted to serve a three-year, 'or the war,' term as a corporal in Company G, 48th Pennsylvania. His twenty years' of age was betrayed a little by his "grey" complexion, grey eyes, and dark hair, and at 6'1" in height, he was among the tallest soldiers in the entire regiment. The one-time farmer proved to be a good soldier, and an efficient officer. In September 1862, he was made the regiment's Quartermaster Sergeant, a position he held until September 1864 when he was discharged from the 48th Pennsylvania to accept a first lieutenant's commission in the 35th Regiment of United States Colored Troops (U.S.C.T.). Joining his command near Jacksonville, Florida, Krebs saw action at the battle of Honey Hill, South Carolina, where he received a severe wound. Following his recovery, Krebs next became an Aide-de-Camp to Brevet Major General Charles Devens, commanding the District of Charleston, South Carolina. He remained in the army until his discharge on June 1, 1866. He then headed west, settling in San Francisco, California. An Annual Survivor's Roster of the 48th Pennsylavania published in 1901 still listed Krebs's residence in the Golden Gate City, but I have yet been unable to determine the date of his death.

Tuesday, May 8, 2007

Update

Well, I just finished the final keystrokes on my Presbyterian Cemetery Self-Guided Walking Tour. It is a sixteen-page brochure, which includes a map and the biographies of eleven Civil War soldiers buried within the cemetery. I now plan to run some copies of it, save it to CD, and send it to Mr. Tom Shay of the Schuylkill County Civil War Round Table & Discussion Group. Tom said he will convert it to a pdf file and post it on his Schuylkill County in the Civil War website for downloading. We also intend to place many, many copies of it throughout Schuylkill County, including at the cemetery itself. So if you are in the area and want to take a trek through this historic graveyard, I'd say wait a few weeks and it should all be ready to go. I'll let you know when Tom has it uploaded on his site.
Now, on to the next project. . .

Friday, May 4, 2007

Case Closed. . .Solving the Mystery of Emerguildo Marquis

A many, many years' long mystery was solved this past week.
It all began simply enough. About a decade ago, I was searching the 1850 Census Records in an effort to learn more about the family of James Nagle. I found his household: James Nagle, Age 28, Painter; his wife Elizabeth, and their three children, Emma, George, and James W. Then, at the bottom of the list was Emerguildo Marquis: Age 11, Born in Mexico. My curiosity was picqued. Who was this kid? My immediate thought was this: since James served in the Mexican-American War, he "adopted" this child, and brought him back to Pottsville where he and his family raised him. But I wanted to find out for sure. Never did I think that this quest would span ten years!
I searched through all the records, but found little. I discovered that Emerguildo signed up to serve in the 6th Pennsylvania, a three-month regiment organized in April 1861, and commanded by Colonel James Nagle. I then contacted the National Archives and requested his service records. Weeks later, a copy of Emerguildo's file arrived at my door. It confirmed the fact that he did, indeed, serve in the 6th Pennsylvania, and it also disclosed that he reenlisted as a bugler in the 3rd Pennsylvania Cavalry, to serve a three-year enlistment. Also contained in the file was a letter written by James Nagle, now a Brigadier General, dated December 22, 1862. "I have the honor to make application to have Emerguildo Marquis, Bugler in Captain White's Company 3rd PA Cavalry, detailed as bugler and orderly, for these Hd. Qrs.," the letter began. "He is a Mexican Boy that I brought along from Mexico. He was with me in the three months service, after that he enlisted in the Cavalry, and he is now desirous of joining me in some capacity, and I only have three mounted orderlies, and need a bugler at Head Quarters to sound the General Calls." Nagle's request was granted and Emerguildo became a member of General Nagle's staff. I was struck by the fact that Emerguildo was a bugler. The Nagle family was very musically-inclined, with James's brothers Levi and Abraham serving as musicians in the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry. From here, however, the trail once again went cold.
Some time later I read through the cemetery records of the Pottsville Presbyterian Cemetery, the one for which I am currently developing a walking tour. I immediately headed up there to search for the grave. Perhaps it included a date a death, then I could look up his obituary in the Miners' Journal, but, alas, I couldn't find it. I talked to many people, and they told me he was, indeed, buried in the cemetery, but where? Once again the trail went cold.
Last summer, I thought I would at long last solve the mystery when I happened upon Nagle's diary from the Mexican-American War, held at Brown University and available online. I searched through all 174 pages, but once again found nothing. I couldn't believe it. Perhaps my original assumption was wrong.
By the start of 2007, I still hadn't solved the mystery that was Emerguildo Marquis. Then it all came together. This past week, a descendant of General Nagle visited the Antietam Battlefield. He and I had been in contact for years, but this was the first time we met. He brought along a number of old documents, letters, diaries, et cetera, related to James Nagle and I was simply blown away. In his collection was Emerguildo's discharge certificate. He was discharged on August 24, 1864, with his three-year term of enlistment coming to an end. The document also stated that Emerguildo was born in Mexico, was twenty-six years of age, stood 5'1" in height, had a dark complexion, black eyes, and black hair. His occupation: painter. Painter, just like General James Nagle.
In addition to this was a short description of James Nagle's service in Mexico, written by his daughter Kate. "It was a long sad time for folks at home," wrote Kate, "but great rejoicing when word came that the war was over and the Army was waiting for orders to move; and greater was the joy when a telegram came saying Come to Philadelphia with the children to meet us." "A number of the wives of the Soldiers went to Philadelphia to meet their husbands. When they met them, they saw three persons who were not Soldiers, but little Mexican boys about 9 or 10 years of age. They were very small, dark skin, no shoes. . . .They learned to love the Soldiers, and when they broke Camp the little boys followed them (stole their way, so to speak). When they were discovered the Army was miles out of the City of Mexico. They would not go back. They were little orphans, and the Officers took charge of them and landed them at home in Pottsville. Captain [James] Nagle, Lieut. Simon Nagle, and Lieut. Frank B. Kaercher, each took a little Mexican boy to their homes. The one Captain Nagle cared for was, by name, Emerigildo Marquis, known as 'Marium.' He was treated as one of the family. He was sent to school, sent to learn a trade, Jeweler. He was away from home to work, but never forgot the family; he came home very often over the week ends. He lived to be about 45, grew up with the family. He loved Father & Mother Nagle, and the Children all loved him. He died at the Nagle home, about the year 1877."
I could not believe what I was reading. . .Finally, after all these years, the mystery of Emerguildo Marquis was finally solved. And what a great story he was. I am still smiling from this discovery, but even more so after another discovery yesterday.

Yesterday was my 'Saturday,' so I took to trip to Schuylkill County to visit with my family and to get some more photographs of the Presbyterian Cemetery for my walking tour. I came across the grave site of Daniel & Mary Nagle, James's parents, plus his two sisters, Eleanor and Elizabeth. Two of these four stones were knocked over, and a third was severely leaning. (See photo below). I went home, waited for my dad to come home from work, and my sister from Lehigh University, and then, with my mom as well, we grabbed some pry bars and shovels and headed up to the cemetery to do some repair and restoration. We reset the stone that was leaning, lifted up and reset the two that had fallen down.
At the foot of one of Nagle's sister's grave was a stone that was sunken deep into the ground. My sister started to remove the dirt and grass that was covering the stone, and soon it struck us all. There, underneath years of dirt and grass was: "Emerguildo Marquis."
In one week, in a just a few days, rather, his mystery was solved AND I finally found his grave site. It's funny how some things work out this way.
Emerguildo, who died in 1880, was buried along with the rest of the Nagle family, another testimonial to the fact that he was, indeed, considered a part of the family. The pictures below show me and my family restoring the graves of the Nagle family in the Presbyterian Cemetery.
* * * * * * * * * *
The "Before" Picture. . .
This is what the Nagle family grave site looked like prior to our restoration.
(See the one at bottom right, buried in the ground?)
The Stone of Emerguildo Marquis
(Buried deep into the ground)

Mystery Solved

Resetting the Stone

A Good Days' Work


The "After" Picture

The Nagle Family's Grave Site Restored

(The tall stone in the background is the final resting place of General James Nagle)