Friday, January 2, 2009

Looking Ahead To 2009

A New Year is upon us and with it comes all the hopes and wishes for brighter days ahead. It is at this time that most of us resolve to make some changes or to do things a little differently. That feeling of the proverbial clean slate is noticeable, which helps motivate us to make a promise to ourselves to work a little harder and go that extra mile, so to speak. By doing so, we can hopefully achieve some of those old goals, and perhaps some new ones, so that by this time next year, we will be able to cross off some of those things on our lives' to-do lists. Whatever it is you hope to accomplish, now is the ideal time to chart the course ahead.

In a few weeks, America's forty-fourth president will take the Oath of Office, while on February 12, we will commemorate the 200th birthday of our sixteenth Chief Executive. 2009 will also witness the 145th Anniversary of all the significant Civil War events that occurred in 1864, such as the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg, as well as the fall of Atlanta, the reelection of Abraham Lincoln, and the destruction of the Confederate Army of Tennessee following the bloodletting at Franklin and Nashville.
And, of course, 2009 will see the 145th Anniversary of the 48th Pennsylvania's tunneling of the Petersburg Mine and the resulting disaster at the battle of the Crater.


As we commemorate the Abraham Lincoln bicentennial and move closer to the Civil War's sesquicentennial, now only two years away, there promises to be many excellent works published. A few of the titles to which I am looking forward, and which will hit the shelves within the next six months include:

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


In The Trenches at Petersburg: Field Fortifications and Confederate Defeat,
by Earl Hess (University of North Carolina Press, June 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

A Savage Conflict: The Decisive Role of Guerillas in the American Civil War,
by Daniel E. Sutherland (University of North Carolina Press, June 2009)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

William Francis Bartlett: Biography of a Union General in the Civil War,
by Richard A. Sauers and Martin H. Sable (McFarland, 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


The Civil War in the East: A Strategic Assessment,
by Brooks Simpson (Greenwood Publishing Group, June 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Master of War: The Life of General George H. Thomas,
by Benson Bobrick (Simon & Schuster, February 2009)
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Jayhawkers: The Civil War Brigade of James Henry Lane,
by Bryce Benedict (University of Oklahoma Press, April 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Sickles At Gettysburg: The Controversial Civil War General Who Committed Murder, Abandoned Little Round Top, and Declared Himself the Hero of Gettysburg,
by James Hessler (Savas-Beatie, May 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


John Brown's War Against Slavery,
by Robert McGlone (Cambridge University Press, April 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


No Quarter: The Battle of the Crater,
by Richard Slotkin (Random House, July 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


Like a Meteor Blazing Brightly: The Short but Controversial Life of Colonel Ulric Dahlgren,
by Eric J. Wittenberg (Edinborough Press, June 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


The Unpopular Mr. Lincoln: The Story of the Most Reviled American President,
by Larry Tagg (Savas-Beatie, May 2009)


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


The Complete Gettysburg Guide: Walking and Driving Tours of the Battlefield, Town, Cemeteries, Field Hospital Sites, and Other Topics of Historical Interest,
by J. David Petruzzi (Savas-Beatie, May 2009)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
Here's to 2009, and my best wishes for a happy, healthy, and prosperous New Year!

6 comments:

Larry Tagg said...

Thank you, Mr. Hoptak, and gentlemen, for mentioning my book, _The Unpopular Mr. Lincoln_, coming out in May. If there's anything I can do for you, please let me know.

Yours,
Larry

James Hessler said...

Hi John,

Thanks for mentioning my upcoming book! "Sickles at Gettysburg" will be published on May 1, 2009.

Dan Sickles is, to put it mildly, a polarizing name in Civil War circles. (I often meet my fair share of hostility when discussing him on battlefield tours or with CW Roundtables.) But even his critics have to admit that he had a colorful career. My book will cover his murder trial, early Civil War career, Gettysburg in detail, his post-war attacks on George Meade, and his significant role in developing Gettysburg National Military Park.

I hope you enjoy the book and visit my website at www.sicklesatgettysburg.com!

Regards,
James Hessler
Author of "Sickles at Gettsburg"
Coming in May 2009 from Savas Beatie
www.sicklesatgettysburg.com

John David Hoptak said...

Mr. Tagg & Hessler,

You are both very much welcome. I look forward to reading both of these titles.
Mr. Tagg: I thoroughly enjoyed your Generals at Gettysburg and use it quite frequently. I am hoping to compile a similar work, only on the leaders at Antietam.
Mr. Hessler: Dan Sickles was, indeed, a colorful figure. I would have loved to have been there that fateful day on Lafayette Square when he gunned down Barton Key, and when, on July 2, 1863, he was carried from the field, cheering the troops and puffing on a cigar, while his leg hanged there by threads.

Have a great New Year!

Anonymous said...

Oh great, another impressive looking book on Gettysburg. Just what I need! Just in time for the summer season.

Just finished two very good books. Brian Holden Reid's "America's Civil War: The Operational Battlefield 1861-1863" and Ethan Rafuse's "Robert E. Lee and the End of the Confederacy 1863-1865".

Reid contends (among other things)that the indeciviness of the Civil War battlefield due poor staff work and the inability of commanders to coordinate attacks and not to the rifled musket and the resilency of Civil War armies. Rafuse puts both Joe Hooker and especially George Meade in a much more favorable light and gives the Lincoln Administration low marks for tieing the Army of the Potomac to the Orange-Alexandria Railroad not keeping the Army on the Peninsula. Check 'em out John.

John C. Nicholas

John David Hoptak said...

John,
Thanks for the suggestions. I have been meaning to read Dr. Rafuse's new work.

John

John David Hoptak said...

John,
Thanks for the suggestions. I have been meaning to read Dr. Rafuse's new work.

John