The Civil War Letters of Private Daniel Reedy, Company E, 48th Pennsylvania Infantry

The Civil War Letters of Private Daniel Emmanuel Reedy
Company E, 48th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry

[This Image Was Found In The Reedy Collection Though Not Identified.
It May Very Well Be An Image of Daniel Reedy But Cannot Be Confirmed As Of This Time]


Reedy was mustered into service on December 8, 1861. He was twenty years of age, stood 5'4 3/4" in height, had a Fair Complexion, Brown Eyes, and Chestnut colored Hair. He provided his occupation as laborer and his residence as Donaldson, in Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania. Reedy served with Company E, under the command of Captain William Winlack. He was captured in August 1862 in northern Virginia and was confined at Libby Prison before being exchanged. At the Battle of Cold Harbor, on June 3, 1864, Reedy was mortally wounded, having been pierced with anywhere between 7-10 bullets. He died on June 6, 1864, as a result of these wounds. 

Reedy's Civil War letters were discovered during a home renovation several years ago and represent quite a remarkable collection, for not only have the letters been saved but so, too, have the envelopes. In all, there are over 100 letters in this collection, including several from agents of the United States Christian Commission describing Reedy's wounds and treatment following Cold Harbor. Reedy's letters begin in December 1861 at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, and then continue to document his service and experiences in North Carolina, Virginia, Kentucky, and Tennessee. His last letter was written on May 27, 1864, just a few days prior to his mortal wounding at Cold Harbor. The letters provide not only a glimpse at the Civil War from the inside but allow us to discover more about one soldiers' experience as well as the history of the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry. Most were written to his brothers, some to his sisters, and a few to his father. 

The letters are published here for the first time thanks to the kindness of Mr. Thomas Golden, who has possession of the letters. The content of the letters has not been altered or edited and is reproduced using Reedy's own spelling and punctuation. 


[Please be aware that these letters and any content contained therein cannot be used, reproduced, or published without first getting authorized permission from the owner of this letter collection, Mr. Thomas Golden]





A Sampling of Daniel Reedy's Civil War Letters




1861

1. December 11, 1861
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Baltimore Dec 11th 1861
Dear Father
            I take this oppertunity to inform you that I am well And hope that this may find you in the same state of health. Father I let you know that we left Pottsville on on Monday at 9 O clock and reached Harrisburg on half past one o clock and then we were mustered into the U.S. service and were equiped we got 2 drawers 2 under Shirts 2 over shirts 2 pair of stickers pair of pants overcoat and blanck [blanket] napsack canteen haversack and 3 days rations and then stayed in Harrisburg to Tuesday 15 minutes past one o clock we left for Baltimore and reached here last at 7 O clock and were taken to the union association House and were treated very kindly since I left home there were some stones thrown in our car as were coming into Baltimore one came into the window and near hid one of our Recruits we will leave here at 5 O clock to night for Fortress Monroe and I got into good company Jim Shields is going to accompany us and we are going to join Capt Winlack Company I will write again as soon as we reached end
From Your Affliction Son
D.E. Reedy


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2. December 18, 1861
To brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Fortress Monroe
December 18th 1861
Dear Brother
            I now take this oppertunity to let you know that I am well and hope that this may find you the same Further I let you that we let Baltimore on Wednesday night half past 5 o clock on the steamer Georgeanna and reached here yesterday morning at 8 O clock and were take to head quarters and are treated very kindly get more than we can eat you aught to see all the canons here the big ones some are hear that wight about 15000 and 5 pounds and carry a ball that weighs six hundred pounds and all the shells they are only 1200 soldiers in this fortress but about 1 mile from here they are about 12000 soldiers I am in good spirits still and would like to have a good fight here but we will leave here as soon as we get a chance they are 10 of us it may be about 2 weeks here tell Mother not to fret about fore there is no danger there and we hope to see you all again dont write again for I will write again as soon as I get to my Journeys end I seen all kind of game from the deer to the duck I seen about 4 millions of ducks and wild geese we seen them by 1000 in flocks we are now one hundred and eighty miles from Fort Hatteras.
From your
Afflictionate Brother
D.E. Reedy
Give my best respects to all my friends up tows tell John Farne [or Horne] that if he was along with us we would show him to drill.
Yours Truly
D.R. Reedy



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3. December 22, 1861
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Winfield December 22nd 1861
Dear Father
            I now take this oppertunity to inform you that I reached Hatteras at last I am well yet and hope that may find you the same Further I let you know that I cant sent home a certificate for you to draw my wages but I will sent them home as soon as I get them Hatteras is a miserable place but we are in camp about five miles from there it is a very fine place there are only one kind of trees here but there are as thick as our grand Oaks they call them oak trees but they have a red berry on as for our journey I have very little to say for we traveled mostly by night and all we seen was ducks and geese We all joined Capt Winlack company Eleven of us. I seen John DeKant and all of the Tremont boys there are a few sick here but not dangerously tell Mother that I have plenty of Uncle Sams pies When I was at Monroe I seen more break boiled in one day as it would take to feed all the people of Donaldson a whole week you could not [?] place but there were loafs of bread swimming in the water there are expecting to have a fight here before long and there are building two new forts here and I expect to come home on the fourth of July you must excuse bad writing for I am writing on my plate
Tell Aaron that I would send him the nicest present that he ever seen They are all [?] of shell here that you may see I would like to know if it was cold at home for here it is like summer there was no sine of snow here yet
From your Afflictionate son
D.E. Reedy
Direct your letter to Daniel E. Reedy
            In care of Captain Winlack
            Co.E  48 Regt PV
            Hatteras Inlet N.C.
            via Fortress Monroe


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4. December 23, 1861
To brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
December 23rd 1861
Camp Winfield Hatteras Inlet
Dear Brother
            I now let you know that I am well and hope that you are the same I send home one letter to Father from Baltimore and one to Aaron from Fortress Monroe and now I would like to know wether you received them letters I send my red shirt home for you as mother told me you would like to have it tell Josephy Athey I would like him to write to me give him the directions please to send me that song in that new book Jeff says he is going to fight you will find it some where in the book this is a very fine place plenty good Hering (?) watter here and all the nice shell I can not tell you all I seen in ten days but I will send home a box of shell in a few weeks I seen the Babys that you to live in Donaldson their names are James & William Greener they send their best respects to you tell Father that A Stand of arms is a musket and and the equippage that a soldier carries tell mother that I am very glad here that this place is [?] tell her that I seen the Governor of North Carolina that he live only about one quarter of a mile from our quarters plenty of fish here and Oyster too
            Do not forget to write soon for I cannot write again for the paper was all here and I gave my paper all away let me know how Sammy is coming on tell him that I would send him a present soon
your Afflictionated Brother

Direct your letter to
Daniel E. Reedy
In care of Capt Winlack
Co. E 48 Regt PV
Hatteras Inlet NC
via Fortress Monroe


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1862


5. January 8 or 9; Stamped on Envelope that it was sent on Jan. 10
To Mr. B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA  
Hatteras Inlet N.C.
Camp Winfield
January   1862

Dear Father
            I take the pleasure to inform you with these few lines that I am well at present and in good spirits and I hope that this may find you in the same state of health. Further I let you know that we expect an attack every day but I hope they will stay away untill we we have our new fort finished we have three new forts to build and they have to work every other day I did not do any work yet nor was I on guard we have nice times plenty to eat and drink we get meat three times a day and coffee three times a day and hard bread too further I never thought that time could pass away so soon for I never thought about christmas until till they told me it was christmas eve and now it is new years and I had a jolly christmas my partner Henry Lord got a box from home full of mince pies and sponge cake and other kinds of cake and I bought a half of a gallon of cider from Isaac Lippman for twenty five cents and so we had plenty of each he is Coal Ridge and me and him sleep together and are together all the time and I seen some very nice deer I seen one shot I was only about seventy five yards away from the deer the boy that shot him is from New York he weigh one hundred and ninety four pounds And he gave me ten pounds and we had some for christmas dinner I wish you a happy New Years and a merry christmas plenty of money and cellar full of beer untill I come home again further I let you know that New Year passed away very quietly there was not one man drunk in this Company Mr. Kupp is in the same barrack that I am in Tell mother not to fret about me for I am all right nothing to complain off plenty of every thing tell Aaron that I would send him a nice christmas present before long and Sammy too. we were Inspected by the Doctor on New Year all we all passed except two I was walking around the Island and I found a grave with these words on the head stone. Adieu dear friends I take my leave farewell my loving wife our children dear your guardian be and bless your widowed life affliction [?] lone time I Care Physicians were in vain and death did seize and cure me of my pain
Dear Father I received your letter on the 7th day of January dated Dec 28th and was very glad to hear that you were all well and Further I was glad to hear that you received all my letters And I would like to know wether you received my cloth for I send them home from Harrisburg
received three letters one from Jos. Athey and another from L.S. Reed and they all mentioned about Ben Henry and I was sorry for him but I cant help to laugh at our General for he has new drills every day we now learn the zouaves drill and it came very hard on me first but now I can go through it all without making a mistake and I had to stand guard one night and it rained all day and night but I was hardly on my post before I thought I was on one hour the Relief came around and then I rested 4 hours. I must close for the reveille is beating and we have to go drill.
From Your afflicationated (?)
Son
Daniel E Reedy


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6. Unknown Date/Hatteras Inlet, NC
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hyde County, N.C.
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
Dear Father  and Mother
            I take this pleasant opportunity to inform you that I still am in good health and spirits and I hope this may find you all in the same state of health. Further you stated in your last letter that I should write once a week but it is impossible for me to write oftener for I send a letter every time that the boat comes in and the steamer runs irregalar and so you must excuse me for writing sooner and you must not forget to write every week or sooner one of the family and you said that if I thought my letters would go safer with stamps you would send me some its makes no difference here they with stamps or without and you mentioned a bout snow I seen no snow since I came here and it was only cold for three day and now it is just like summer on Tuesday the robins started to come here in flocks on Thursday night the 12th of January it rained all night and I was out on the open sea then other men besides myself we went out in a flat boat to go to a schoner for beef and on our way in we got stug on a sand bar and there we had to stop all night and I seen more fish and eels (?) that night that I every seen in my life we are in no danger now for last week we got a reinforcement of thirteen gunboats and very likely we will go across the sound and flog the rebels there came Eighteen negroes here from these and they say that they have three batteries there and a force of seven hundred men and that if we took that place we could travel for miles in N.C. and see no rebels they say that their were thousands of people in this state that would help us if they had a chance they have no cloth and shoes and a great many other things we had a jolly New Years here we were boating and there was barrels of cider in the boat and as soon as the General found it our he knocked the head out of them and then you aught to see the canteens and buckets flying and we rolled a barrel in the woods and then we had enough but the general would not alow them to drink any and so three hogsheads were spiled but we safed our barrel &c cheese is 18 cents a pound here and butter 30 cts a pound ink 5 cts a bottle bread 10 cts a loaf and every thing in proportion I must close this letter for I have no time I have clean my gun
I still remain your
applicitionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy

Direct as before

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7. January 15, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Hyde County N.C.
Camp Winfield
January 15th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir I now take this oppertunity to inform you that I still retain my good health And I hope that this may find you the same. Further I let you that I seen a great sight on the 13th ult. A great fleet came here and lays here yet this fleet is composed of some seventy odd vessels and some very large one too we started a new forte again and we will have a strong place here this Island is fifty miles long and over two miles long and nearly level it has some sand banks about a place like pine valley on sunday way walking around And we found a strong tree to us it is just like the evergreen only that it is as tall thee oak I allmost forgot to tell you that we have church here twice every sunday and a very good preacher too you aught to see the horses here they are smaller than Tomison's [?] pony and the sheep and cow too the men and women are very long thin slender and nearly all the men are fisherman Aaron you must not forget to write for I get no new here we have fine times here work three days a week and wheele one or two barrows in half a day and sometimes we do nothing at all. give my best respects to Mr. Sailer and Mrs. Sailer further I let you know that they are a very sick here now but I now must close for I have no time to write more this time Give my best respects to L.H. Shoafstall
From your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct your letter to Daniel E. Reedy
            In care of Captain Winlack
            Company E 48 Regt P.V.
            Hatteras Inlet NC
            via Fortress Monroe



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8. January 17, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Winfield N.C.
January 17th 1862
Dear Brother
            It take this pleasant oppertunity to inform you that I am still in good health and I hope this may find you in the same state of health Further I let you know that we are going to get a new uniform this week and further we get more to eat and drink than we are able to destroy I have about ten pounds of crackers saved now we get salt pork and mess beef and fresh beef, peas, beans, potatoes Hominee, rice, vinegar, salt, sugar coffee, candles, soap, and crackers & molasses, and soon we will get bread. Last night I was on picket and a steamboat wrecked and then you aught to see the boxes lining along the shore & barrels and kind of stuff and we had fine time picking up fish and roasting them further I let you know that they are one hundred and eight vessels here now belonging to Burnsides expedition and they expect more to come every day and it is rumered the we are to go along with the fleet and the New York boy's are going along allso but I guess that we will stay here yet we will get pay the next time the S.R. Spaulding down I wrote a letter to father in the beginning of this month and allso one on the seventh of this month and I have received no answer yet I almost thought that he had left home and then I wrote one to Aaron tell Mother that I will be a tailor before I come home I can fix a pair of pants all most as good as any tailor their is a boy in company K by the name of John B. Reedy and when I seen him I thought that it was Uncle Henry for he looks just like him I am acquainted with a great many fellows now and so it is just like home to me I received them songs in Jos. Athey's letter and I was please to see them come for I am very lonesome on sundays for us have no place to go and as I only have a testament a get tired of reading in it and so it does a fellow good to get some thing new to read Give my best respects to Joseph Athey and to all other good friends. Our Lieutenant when home recruiting and I guess he will visit Donaldson
            Write as soon as you get this
            From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct your letter to Daniel E. Reedy
In care of Captain Winlack
            Company E 48 Regt P.V.
            Hatteras Inlet NC
            via Fortress Monroe



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9. February 1, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
February 1st 1862
Dear Father
            I take the libberty to inform you that I am still in good health and I hope that this may find you all in the same state of health. Further I let you the Burnsides fleet is still and our whole Brigade is landed here and we had a grand review here on the last day of January The regements in the field were the 48th Regt P.V. and 9th Regt. N.Y.V. and 6th Regt N.H.V. 89th Regt. N.Y.V. 11th Regt. C.V. and all the field officers were in the field for the first time since I am here just As I was writing this letter the mail came in and I received your kind and long looked for letter of January 20th and I received it on the 1st of this month and it made me feel sorry to hear that my two little brothers were sick, but I was glad to hear that they were up again I received your letter first and was glad to hear from you Further I let you that five vessels wrecked and ninety horses were lost the Colonel and Major of the ninth New Jersey whent out in a small boat to shoot ducks and were both drowned and I was walking on the grave yard and I seen the name of Shaffer of the 51st Regt. P.V. buried there who fought in the war of 1812. I have nothing to complain of only we get drilled to much at present we only get one and a half hour rest all except we are on fatigue duty and then we have fine times I get on twice a week and on guard on picket every ten day I must close this letter now for I have nothing more to say
Write again
From your son
Daniel E. Reedy



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10. February 3, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
February 3, 1862
Dear Brothers and Sisters
            I was much please to receive a letter from you Dear Brother but you forgot to put a name to it and so I don't know which one. I was glad to hear that you were all well I am well at present and I hope this may find you in the same state of health. You mentioned that you would have wrote sooner but you had no time for you had to many lesson to learn. I wonder how you would do if you had to drill eight hours and a half a day like I have to do and I could ten letters every week. I would go to the captain and get excused for three hours and so you must do. Tell mother not to be uneasy about the weather here for it could not be nicer in May at home no mud here like no Donaldson and when it rains we have no drills tell her that I miss her pies now. Ha Ha Ha. You can keep yourself ready until I come home I will pay you for the 14th day of January. David Williams is in here with me too he sends his best respects to you. Tell Sarah and Hannah that I allmost forgot them but I write to Sarah before long. You will get your present before long for I have it ready soon. James Greener Sends his best respects to you all and give my best respects to Old Mary please to let her me know something about [?] Hatter for I heard nothing from him yet I will tell you something about sunday here. We first we do we go on inspection after that we go to the captain's quarters And get a library and then go to church at ten o clock and at three o clock and then dress parade at five and then we are done for the day. Further I let you know that a Rebel schonner run in Hatteras Loaded with wood and was taken with four men on board of her they say that they run her in to surrender They were ten or eleven negroes came here from Roanoke Island and they say that the Rebels have three forts and well fortified and about thirty thousand Rebels there and a strong fort on main land and a strong force too there was a vessel come with a [flag] of Truce and they say that they are willing to give up Roanoke Island and Elizabeth town if we would not burn the town down and they are taken prisenor's too and are in the fort, I will tell you that it is a grand sight to see the waves roll mountain high and to see the little ship skip a cross them. we only buried three men since I come here out of our Regtement and they are only a few sick just now. I seen four snakes here allready and very large ones too And I seen the roses in full bloom and all the trees green. I got a great Ducking last week. We went down in a small boat to the fort for some provision and it started to thunder and it lightening flashed and the rain pored down we got upset but thanks be to god the water was only about three feet deep and so we got out again safe. There are more soldiers landing every day The Island is getting full of them. Tell Mr. Horne that William Daubert is here with us he would like to know if he did Remember times they had at Middle Creek coming up the air hole Tell Samuel that I had a nice present for him and that I would send it to him in the next boat. I will send a sea snake for Aaron too I will send a lot of small Ear Ring droppers for the girls and you will find two large shells like like the head of a bird and you will take a chill and cut two holes in them and wear them on your neck tie like we do hear the cunks are for Samuel and Aaron and the small shell for mother and father. You will find a sea bean and you will take care of it for to cure the piles and you will see a row of beeds from the Rebels I must close now for I have no time just now dont for get to write every week for I write a letter every mail that goes a way from here Give my best Respects to all my good friends.
I still Remain your
Brother
Daniel. E Reedy




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11. February 6, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Winfield
Hatteras Inlet N.C.
February 6th 1862
Dear Father
            Sir: I take this pleasant oppertunity to inform you that I am still in good health and in good spirits and I hope that this may find you all in the same state of health Further I let you know that we are all well and and in good spirits and we still remain in the same place and have no hopes to get away from here yet there are still more vessels coming and still more troops landing here there are lots of horses landed here too. And we are got new rules every day and we have easyer times here now than we had for a long time back very little duty to do we only have to go on guard or on picket and in Twelve day that once month we have to stand twice once on guard and once on picket and the next month three times and when we come off guard we get two days for ourselves and then we can go where we have a mind to go too except outside of our pickets when we are on picket we have orders to shoot the first man who attempts to pass out we only halt him once and then we cock our muskets and then if they dont stop the second time we halt them we have to fire by order of the General their was one man shot through the leg last week but he is getting better again We received no pay yet but we expect to get paid every week the paymaster is at fortress monroe these three last weeks on the first of month we had the coldest day that we had yet since we are on the Island it was not so cold as it was at home when I left and we were all going to freeze we were walking about with our overcoats on and around the fires some thought they had to die and they kept in their bunks and covered themselves up and stop there all day we have a very fine Ordly Sergeant his name is Joseph H. Fisher he is a american and he is a very fine man he had no trouble with his men as the other sergeant have if he speaks they have all to be quite and the captain is a fine man too We all get a very nice dress coat to wear on inspections and new caps too. Further I let you know that I and going to get an alotment ticket to draw my money at Pottsville and I will send it home to you next mail. And if you please send me a few stamps for I think our letter's go sooner with stamps than they without them. I must close my letter for I have no time to write any more at present Give my best Respects to mother and to all my dear Brothers and Sisters
From Your afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before



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12. February 10, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
February 10th 1862
Dear Father
            I received your kind letter to day dated Feb. 1st. 62 And I was glad to hear from you I am well at present and I hope that this may find you in the same state of health I received three of your letters and one from John I wrote three to John and four to you and two to Aaron And I received four stamps too. Further I let you that we are going to get paid to-morrow But I guess I will not draw much this time for we were only here for Eight days till the two month were up But I will send an Alottment Ticket soon For you to draw it in Pottsville. There is no news here than we had this long time we are still in the same spot and it is still warm here only it rains all the time and so we have no drilling to do But When we drill we go out with our knapsacks on and in heavy marching orders We are all well and we expect to get of this Island before long. I will write every day that a boat goes off there was no boat come here this long time I must close my letter now
Direct your letters as before
From your Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Enclosed you will find an allotment ticket and you can draw [?] Dollars every month at Pottsville at the Military Relief Board of Sch Co Pa
Daniel E. Reedy


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13. February 11, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
February 11th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir: I take the pleasant oppertunity to inform you that I am still in good health And I hope that this may find you in the same state of health Further I let you know that the weather is still warm here but it rains nearly three days every week And so we have very fine times here all that we do when it rains is we go out at evenings for inspection and dress parade Tell Aaron that I had Great dream about him Last night I dreamed that we was hear and that we had a fight and that he was shot at my side and A great many more of my companions were killed too And when I got up in the morning I thought it was so and I was entirely lost that day I was over where the Eight Ninth New York Regement is camped and I seen three men punished for disobeying order they could not move They had their hand tied around a tree with a rope so that they could not stir and a board on their breasts with the following word wrote on them disobedience of orders. We fight on we little soldiers. The battle we shall win For the Saviour is our Captain And he hath vanquished sin I am glad I am in this army And [?] battle for the school--I have nothing Partickerularly to write to you but I am sorry to state that some of our men are dieing Every day there is a funeral here nearly Every day but now I must close my letter You will find a song in this letter and if you Please give it to Mr. Joe Athey to copy and then you can keep it
From Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Miss Hannah M Reedy you must excuse me for not writing to you for I have no time to write at present Give my best respects Sarah J. Reedy and Brother Aaron H Reedy here are three kisses for Samuel
Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy



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14. February 12, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
February 12th 1862
Dear Father
            I take this oppertunity to inform you with these few lines that I am well and I hope that this may find you in the same state of health Further I let you know that the fleet had a grand victory after a hard fight They took all their vessels and captured four forts and have taken upwards of three thousand prisenors I am sorry to say that we are going over there in a few day we have marching order and we will be the first attack Newbern so the Colonel says Elizabeth Town is burned down I am as [?] I never was hasty in my life I have nothing more to say at present bit I will write again as soon as I get a chance for we have to make ready to go
From Your Son
Daniel E. Reedy


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15. February 26, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Winfield
Hatteras Inlet
February 26th 1862
Dear Father
            I take this pleasant oppertunity to inform you that I Received your letter Dated Feb 17th and one from brother Dated Feb 18th but no name to it I send an allotment ticket last mail and I think it will reach you before you will get this. We are still under marching orders and I guess we will go to the main land in a few day's the Regiments have all left last week the old gray grizzly headed General Williams and staff have left too and so we are alone here by ourselves and we have it very easy Now Col Nagle took all the hard drill of us now. I have nothing particular to write at present only yesterday the tide rose very high running all over the parade ground and nearly drowned out the water rose within seven feet of our barracks and we were all bussy throwing up entrenchments.  I am still well and I Pray to god that this may find you all the same we hear nothing out hear about the war it is all quite hear we hard the cannons roar when the were Bombarding Roanoke Island it roared like thunder. I would be much please if you were kind enough to send me some writing paper for we can not get any here at present. I send home a nice box of shell But I think it reached you before this letter will come home. Give my Best respects to all my friends Enclosed you will find some eye stones put them away very carefully for they will take out any dirt in your eyes to trey them put them on a plate and pour vinegar on them and they run all around. and before putting them in your eyes put them in fresh spring water I must close my letter now for I received four letters to-day and from Port Carbon Please to excuse me for not writing oftener for I send one every mail.
From Your Son
D.E. Reedy
Direct as before


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16. February 27, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
February 27th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir I take this pleasant oppertunity to inform you that I am well and in good spirits And I hope that this may find you all the same Further I received your letter Dated Feb 18th 1862 And as you mentioned about Sleigh party I have no hope of seeing a sleigh let alone snow Tell Sister Elizabeth that I was astonished to hear that the letters were passing fast to Machantango Tell her not to get grazy about them For I wrote two letters to her and got no answer to either of them And I was glad to hear that Samuel was well and growing fast But I think he will not know me when I come home for I am taller and heavier than I was when I left home I gained six pounds Tell Dear Mother not to be uneasy about the weather here for it could not be fairer than it is winter is past here the grass is getting green and they are starting to plant sweet potatoes this is a great place for them we are as comfortable here as at home To-morrow we will be mustered out again for pay the second time since I am on the Island Further I let you know that we had a great fleet here the vessels were going across the bar and god send the storm to help them across for they could not get over when the tide was down. Further last night the rain poured down and the water started to raise and the sea started to roll as high as the mountains slashing and roaring awfull. I am glad to hear that you are getting along in Arithmetic Hear is a little sum for you There was a man he had 70 Dollars lacking one per cent. He was going to buy a horse for 65 Dollars. How much more money had he to get answer this Please to send me a good song or story for I am lonesome. I am fishing nearly every day we catch more fish than we can eat But I hope you will learn to put you name to you letters for I dont know which one wrote the letters And I hope you will write every week now if you can get times I will answer them all but dont forget to put paper in them so that I can write back again for I cant get any here. Tell Aaron not to go to see the girls to much Give my best respects to L.H. Shoafstall and to all my young Friends I received a letter from Cousin Ann Mary yesterday and one from J Athey Give my best respects Joel Hatter Please to let me know all the news about our place and the war. I must close my letter so good bye
But I still Remain your afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before


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17. March 10, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
March 10th 1862
Dear Father
            I take this pleasant oppertunity to inform you that I am still well and in good health And I hope that this may find you all in good health. Further I received your letter to-day bearing date March 2nd And was very glad to hear from home again But about the Colonel resigning there is no word hear about it We have very little news here for the mail dont run regularly at present on account of the fleet And they expect to attack Newbern very soon And it seems as if they were going to have a very hard fight there for they have three Batteries there and have the channel sunk  full of old vessels and then full of spikes to break our vessels and they will surrender Washington right away and retreat to Newbern we have news from there every day from the negroes that come there are about three hundred here allready and they say that they are afraid of the fleet. We are here yet and no hopes of getting away we alone now and we have very fine times now only two small drill a day and we expect to get to ship Island when we leave here they were some letters here said that the report at home that the small pox and black measels were in camp you must not believe the them reports for there no fever are any other sickness in camp at present they are all well and healthy and all in good spirits and all in favor to stay here I send a box of shell home and I would like to know if you got them they left here last week I send ten Dollars a month for you Dear Father And we can get furlough to go home now there are a few going home Mr Kupp when home and they will more to go the next boat Please to let me know the best news about Donaldson the next time you write I will write every mail if I can get paper to write I could not have wrote this only I got this sheet send from Sister Elizabeth every thing is scarce hear now for our suttler is away this long time Butter is twenty five cents a pound and we can get as many fish for ten cents a dozen that we want And we catch a great many ourselves tell Samuel that I would come home before long to see him. Give my Best Respects to all inquiring friends and to all others I have no more to say at present.
But I still Remain
Your Afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before
Answer as soon as possible


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18. March 11, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
March 11th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir: I now take this pleasant oppertunity to inform you that I am still in good health and I hope that this may find you in the same state of health. Further I let you know that we are still in the old place and the trees are in blossom now and the grass in beginning to grow and they are Sowing oats now and planting potatoes. there are only a few sick in this Regiment we are all well. James Greener sends his best respects to you all and allso David Williams it is very pleasant here hardly nothing to do and plenty of every thing. I will send in this letter some eye stones and you will take good care of them. And please to answer this letter right away as we dont know how long we stay hear now Tell Mother that I am all right and not to mind the weather for it could not be fairer than it is and that I would like her to send me a good writing pen. And tell Samuel that I think of him every night when I lay down to sleep and in the day time too Tell John that I wrote a letter to him last week and received no answer yet and if I get a letter it has no name to it and so I dont know who wrote it And Tell Sarah and Hannah that I think of them too. Give by best Respects to Mr. and Mrs. Shoafstall and to all other acquaintances about home and let me know all all the news about Donaldson and all other news that you can get. And now I am going to tell you that our colonel and six of our companies are going away to-morrow morning company E, F, G, K are going to stay here. them that are going are to take their Blanket and overcoat and Napsack and sixty rounds of cartridges along forty in the cartridge boxes and twenty in their pockets and the started this morning and the fleet started away to-day and they will go to Fort Makin and from there to Newbern and I guess we will go soon And I hope they will now win the day I must close by sending my best Wishes to all
But I still Remain
Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before


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19. March 15, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
March 15th 1862
Dear Father
            Sir: I take this pleasant oppertunity to inform you that I am still in good health And I hope that this may find you in the same state of health And I received your letter today Bearing date March 10th And was glad to hear from home again. I allso received a letter from Franklin P. Hettrick and one from Uncle Edward allso one from Cousin Daniel E. Good to day. It is still very warm hear And very pleasant to-day the sun shines very warm I was walking around on the Island to-day and I was astonished to find the Peach trees in full Blossom and in fact every thing is getting in Bloom hear and the People are all busy in planting their things. I which I could send you a barrel of good eels (?) it would only take few days to catch them we are fishing every day with hook and line and we have in fact more than we can use such awful big ones too. and fish of an size and weight their are still more darkeys coming here from main land and they fetch news to us and I seen one who had twelve buckshots in his skin. I reckon you hear all the news about this Place before you receive our letters but we answer them as soon as we get them I hardly take time to read them. Today the news reached us that Manassas Gap was Evacuated and it caused great excitement in camp The Band was out and playing and we were cheering and to-night we are going to have a moon light serenade we have not heard any thing of our six companies yet But expect to hear from them every day we are very lonesome hear now no fun since the boys left us But I hope we will be together again before long I must close now for it is nearly time for dress Parade we only drill three hours a day since Colonel Nagle left us nothing to complain of Plenty of every thing Our cook Baked [?] and Jno. Penman a very fine pudding to-day and we are both a little [?] for he [?] some brandy in it and as you must excuse my Bad writing this time I will try Better next time I will close this by sending my Best wishes to all
So adieu
But I Still Remain Your
Aflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
48 Regt. P.V. Comp. E
Hatteras Inlet NC
via Fortress Monroe
In Care of Capt. Winlack


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20. March 19, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
Camp Winfield
March 19th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir I take the pleasant oppertunity to address you hoping to find you in the same state of health as it leaves me at present. Further I received your kind letter Dated Mar 11th 1862 and I glad to hear from you Enclosed you find a small breast pin for Hannah. I took the pin out for fear it would tear the envelopes you can fix it for her. And I was glad to hear that you were in the Algebra and I hope you may get through it too you will find a great many of them worked out in my box. Further I let you know that we had a fight on Sunday night we when out on patroll and the Islanders fired on us but the did not hid us we then came to camp for some more soldiers and then we started out again and we did not go far till eight shot were fired again and then we fired thirty guns at them wounded one of the me capturing seven musket and we were out all night took Eight of them prisenors and so ended our fight. and I was on picked last week and a black pig came along and me and jinkins were on post together and we thought it was a bear and I fired on it and killed the pig and they all came running and we told them that I shot a bear and so next morning we found the pig the Huckelberries are nearly ripe now and plenty of them too and every thing is very fine in fact all bushes are green we can buy shad for twenty five cents a piece and very large one too. Tell mother not to mind me that I was getting along fustrate I am growing very fast and getting fat, and plenty cloth and every thing else I may wish. David Williams sends his kind Respects to and to all of the rest. If Emmanuel Bressler comes over again tell him to write a letter to me and give him the direction I would like to hear from him and Give him my kind Respects Give my best respects to old Mary the cobbler and tell her that I hoped to come again for the secesh aint got a ball moulded for me yet are else I was killed last Sunday for the balls fell on both sides of us Further I am sorry that you did not get them sea shells for I had a great of trouble to pick them but you may get them yet. Tell mother that the preacher's name if Heimhart and a fine man he is I must close my letter now Give my kind love to all my Brothers and Sisters
From Your afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy


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21. March 31, 1862
To Brother Samuel M. Reedy
Camp Winfield N.C.
March 31st 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as it leaves me at present. I have not wrote a letter these ten days to any of know but I will tell you the reason we were on drill and some one of our boys got a fall and his musket hid my hand and it swelled up At last we found out that two of my fingers were out of joint and I got them put in a gain my hand is not well yet. Mr. Kupp arrived here today and I was glad to hear from home I received that letter from him and I was glad to hear that you were all well I have nothing particular to say this time But I hope that we may get on main land before long I am in good spirit and we have very fine times at present we are moved into the bunks of the Band and we had geese and Ducks every day it is very pleasant hear now give my kind love to all my Brothers and sisters and to mother our two Lieutenants are at home and our O. Sergeant too and so we have our times of it our captain is a very fine man But I expect that kupp told you all about him there are still some secessionists on this island But we are Bringing them down I will tell you how we fixed one of them One of our Boys Bought a bottle of whiskey and we filled it full of water and around the bung hole spiled some whiskey and kept some in the bottle and then berried the barrel and then went to one of them and told them that they had a barrel of whiskey and that if he would give them twelfe dollars he might have it and he wanted to take it so they got the bottle and spiled some in a tin cup and he tasted it and he gave them twelfe Dollars for the barrel of water and we play all kind of tricks on them But I must close this letter now by sending my Best Respects to all and I hope to hear from you soon
I Still Remain your afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
James Greener sends his best respects to all of you


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22. April 4, 1862
To Brother Benneville Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Winfield
April 4th 1862
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as it leaves me at present. Further I received your kind letter bearing date 20th and was glad to hear that you were all well And them snakes are alive when we catch them they are plenty here of every kind I also received that newspaper from Mr. Athey I wrote a letter to sarah a long time ago and I would like to if she received it I also received that letter dated march 12th and I wrote an answer back again I also wrote a letter to Samuel Reed I seen Mr. Kupp and he told me that he seen father and he told me that you were going to send some things But you need not to send any thing to me for I have plenty of every thing geese ducks mutton beef Pork and every thing else but soft Bread but thanks be to God we can live on crackers I am healthy and I gained nineteen pounds since I left Baltimore And it is very hot here now the Islanders say that this is the worst month for burning one black we sweat every time that we go drill but we have very little drilling to do now Mr. Samuel Seward like you to asked Samuel & Zacharias Whetstone if they remembered him yet he send his best Respects to them our company are all healthy David Williams send his kind love to you he is well too and in good spirits. We are still in the same old place and no hopes of getting away from hear. But I hope that this wicked Rebellion to a close for the Union Troops are gaining great Victories lately but we dont get the news regularly But I expect that we will get the new more regular after a little for we will have the rail-road opened through North Carolina before long for Burnsides will rule this state he is a man who did think of retreating But go into it we have [?] We have a table here in are end of the barracks and we live like at home. Ho. I must tell you something about April fool day we had great time here sending some of them four mile from their Barracks but I must come to a speedy close but I will give my best Respects to Old Mary and to all other good acquaintances
So Adieu

***
three kisses for sammy
But I still Remain your
Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
P.S.
oh. ho. you boy I here that you were after Mary Whetstone yet and that you were going to get married
            Daniel E. Reedy



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23. April 10, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Hatteras Inlet
April 10th 1862
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seat myself to write these few lines to you Dear Brother Hoping that this may find you in the same state of health as it leaves me at present. I am still in the same place yet and I like it better every day I was only sick one day since I came from home And that day I had the sick headache and I got some stuff from the doctor I had not got it since A soldiers life suits me to a T. And I hope that you will soon be able to write a letter to me and try your best to write to me this time Newbern is dead and so is secession nine points of the law they say is possession Norfolk is safe while we hold Fortress Monroe Give my best Respects to all the boys around town please to let me know what is going on around Donaldson for we get very little news here the boat runs every irregular now ever since Burnsides fleet come here Our Regiment is divided into four parts now I will send you this song let Joseph Athey copy it and seven eye stones for mother and I will send some more in the next letter that I write Please to let me know wether you Received that breast pin for Hannah I send in John's letter I was going to write to you this long time but every time that I started I had something else to do But I hope you will excuse me for not writing sooner to you I was up the Island about twelve miles yesterday but all that I was able to see was sand and water and a few houses and live oak tree and fig trees which are plenty here But I must come to a close By wishing you all Goodbye
But I still Remain your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy


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24. April 12, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Winfield NC
Saturday April 12th 1862
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seat myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as it leaves me at present Further we are still in the same place yet. it was pretty cold yesterday And this morning it is very pleasant now I am still thinking that we will come home till the fourth day of July Last night I had a dream about home and I thought that I was at home and that was going to come to Hatteras again and that you would not let me go And this morning when I awakened I thought that I was home I looked all around and could not see any of you at last I seen the muskets and the drums rolled for roll call. This afternoon me and John Mercer were walking around one the Island and we found appletrees in full bloom and a Fine bed of cabbage plants the funniest cabbage I ever saw they grow about four feet high I will try to get some seed and send it home And coming along the beech we seen a very large bird So we picked up some shells and started to throw them at the bird and at last the bird started up and made for us and we chased it along the beech untill we were tired out then Lieutenant Sheet's came along and told us that it was a Bald Eagle So we started to run after the eagle and I got the lead all at once the eagle made a dodge on a stump and I run up to it and Started it of again then it flew about five yards and I was nearly up to it and then the eagle started to fly again and stop again and laid right down on his back started to claw at me so I run up to it and put my foot on his neck and his two feet were clasped around my leg and I tried to lose them but he stuck fast untill the other boy's came up and then we captured him. he is going to be send to old Schuylkill I must stop writing for to night the drum is rolling for Roll call and the taps will soon go
So Good night
Sunday April 13th 1862
This is a very fine day and I feel myself very well too. and as it is Sunday I thought that I would write a few lines. Please to send a hymn book in the next mail we are singing every Evening and we have only one book for eight of us. The snakes are getting very numerous you cant walk twenty yards till you see a large black one and so on untill we kill sometimes twenty snakes in an hour Among the many curiosities of this place are the natives I talked to a man here and I asked him if he was such He said no reckoned the sick season was past you can hang your hat on any of their haunch-bones I will send you the church on Hatteras Where their are buried sixty four of our fellow soldiers are buried among the sand. Ho you would laugh to see us on a double quick with a charge and a yell some of us tumbling down and the others tumbling over us
Monday April 14th 1862
Great excitement in camp last night our captain whent over to an islander who came from newbern And he told the captain that he was going back to join the secessionist army and the captain came over to camp and told the Major and the Major send some guards over to fetch him and then they made him take the oath of allegiance and dismissed him and send him home This is a very pleasant day and I feel well the drum is rolling for drill I must go.
Tuesday April 15th 1862
I am still in good health. we are now mooved down to fort clark to drill on the cannon I just came off guard and I am tired
Fort Clark Wednesday April 16th 1862
Dear Brother
            I Received your kind letter today and was glad to hear from you Dear Brother and as I wrote before that snake was alive I wont say any thing about her this time I have nothing to say to-day We got paid to-day and I am still in good health
I must come to a close
Give my best Respects to all
Answer soon
I still Remain your afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy


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25. April 18, 1862
To Sister Sarah Jane Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Fort Clark NC
April 18th 1862
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping to find you in the same state of health as this letter leaves me at present Thank God for it I Received your letter Dated April 7th I was glad to hear that you are well And as you say that you will write every week If I would answer back Dear Sister will answer every letter that I get from home and I guess if samuel laughed untill he went to bed he was nearly bursted for I am sure if I would laugh half an hour I'd burst and you are talking about making Garden that is nothing at all Potatoes are six inches high here and every thing else up it very plesent in camp Winfield now but we had to moove to a miserable hole stinking place But still it is fine here allso Tell mother that I am all right plenty of every thing We have hard times here plenty of nothing to do and sleep which is the hardest work now the sun is very warm and we are all as black as negroes but as for John's Latin I can't make it out I thought that I chicken had scratched over it. We are in swimming every day and we have plenty of shad we buy them for five cents a piece But every thing else is dear I will write a letter to Aaron & Samuel next week if I get a chance to send it away. I must close.
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
To Miss Hannah
            I will write a few lines to you to let you know that I did not forget you yet I have another Breast pin here but it is to big to send in a letter or else I would send it to mother Give my best respects to Brother, Sister Mother and Father
I remain your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy



* * * * * * * * * *
26. April 28, 862
To Brother
Fort Clark NC
April 28th 1862
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seated myself to Write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as it leaves me at present Thank God We are no in Fort Clark drilling on heavy cannon's And after we have learned to drill we are to join a Light Battery and Companies B, H and F But we dont know which Battery we are to join We have a brass cannon here captured in the Revolutionary War from the English Which is one hundred and one year old a french piece Give my kind love to all my good Companions and to cousin Malinda. We are now camped among the Negroes and we have great times here. I will tell you about a prayer meeting the Negroes held here on Easter Sunday three of us went to hear them their preacher gave out the hymn Jesus my all to heaven is gone and they sung it and then he prayed then they sung again he then told Brother Sam to pray and one of them started praying is dat you Sambo no sar it's Brudder Pete stop stop Pete and let Sambo hab a shake at it he can do it better than you  and so it broke in a frolic I seen in John's letter about Sister's ear-rings I seen nothing about them I guess she send them to Machontango and he says too that she wrote two letters to me I received none of them yet he must have send them some other place We are all still in good health and spirits I have great time in the morning waking up the Ordly Sergeant he bunks with us
I still Remain
Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
to Aaron H. Reedy


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27. April 29, 18862
To Sister Hannah/Donaldson, PA
Fort Clark
April 29th 1862
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I let you know that I am still in good health and I hope that this may find you in the same state of health allso Father and Mother and Brothers & sisters I have not much to write and so I will tell you About East Monday I came of Guard at Eight O.Clock and at then Our Captain came to our house and asked us if we would like to have a dinner and we told him we would like it so he went and got his fiddle and played for us and we had a great frolic he is a man that dont think himself higher than a private like most of the captain's Please to tell Father to send me one dollar worth of stamps I will send the money for them as soon as I pay Lippman Please to tell John to try and to send me a song book if he can get one Tell him to wrap in a new paper it is colder here now than it was in January and very storming too And high Tides we are still on the sand banks of Hatteras and God knows when we will get from them Please to let me know all the news about Donaldson in your next letter I must now draw to a speedy close by sending my best Respects to all my friends
            Dont forget to write
I still remain your afflictionated
Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
to
Hannah M. Reedy


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28. May 4, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Fort Clark
May 4th 1862
Dear Father
            With pleasure I write these few lines to you Hoping to find you in all the same state of health as it leaves me at present Further I received your wellcomed letter to day dated April 20 and was glad to here that you were all well I received a small package of papers from Mr Kupp [?] fast And so I tore the letter in opening it and I allso received stamps in nearly all of your letters and four in this and a writing pen and I allso received them two pens in John Letter from mother was glad to get them for I could not get  any them And we had fine time here on Easter Sunday here too And As for new I have nothing to say for we get no news any more all the papers we get are old ones and so we cant get any news We are all in good health But we hope to be relieved in a few days we heard from Burnsides that he would send two artillery companies to take charge of the U.S. property The forts are all filled with powder and balls shells and all kind of other instruments Our captain is going home on a furlough today and so I guess we will have it little harder than we had when he was here. But I hope to see old schuylkill again before long for I think that this great Rebellion will soon be crushed I close by Sending my best Wishes and Respects to mother and sisters and Brothers And hope to hear soon again
So no more at present
I Still Remain Your Afflictionated
Son
Daniel E. Reedy
In a great hurry for the boat will start in a few minutes.


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29. May 12, 1862
To Sister Sarah J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Fort Clark
May 12th 1862
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Today has been a day of great excitement on Hatteras as a steamer came from the north and a mail on board of her but I got not letter I sat down to read an old letter that I Received last mail I than I thought that I would write these few lines to you we received another new uniform which is the third that we got since I am on Hatteras the place where we are at present is a very unpleasant place very hard water when we get our coffee it is half whiskey to keep it from a Salt taste every thing else is very pleasant here but for all I am quite contended here to-day one of our boy's came hear from home and he said that he was sure he seen father in Pottsville but As he was a stranger to him he did not like to say any thing to him by me This is a charming place here right among the niger wenches and buck negroes we have great sport hear sometimes but it is getting very warm here now but I have to come to a speedy close As the boat will leave night Give my best Respects to all my friends
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy


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30. May 18, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Fort Clark
May 18th 1862
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the state of health as it leaves me at present. I received your kind letter date May no date And I was glad to hear that you were all well at home And As you say the trees are all in bloom there is no blossoms hear now but the apples and peaches are nearly full grown hear and plenty of them too And I received them pens also that you send to me I was allso glad to hear that father received his letter which I thought was lost here I would like to know if you received a letter dated April 29th we were paid again yesterday there is a whale washed on shore here thirty six feet long But I must close I have nothing else to write Give my best Respects to Old Mary
Write Soon Again
From Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy

James May send his best respects to Samuel Wetstone
please to tell him
Give him by best respects

Direct your letter as before


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31. May 24, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy
Camp near Newbern
48th Regt. Co. E U.S.A.
May 24th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping to find you in the same state of health As this leaves me at present. Further I let you know that I am now near Newbern on Thursday evenging we went on board the steamer Massasoit for Newbern and landed there on Friday at twelve o clock in Newbern then we started for our camp but we had to stand on the street for nearly two hour with our knapsack on our backs waiting for the band and then we march though Newbern which is a fine a town as I ever seen about the size of Pottsville and the street are very nice to shade on both sides of the road but we had great time coming Hatteras bring nineteen hours on the water we run in the neuse river at day light and after coming up we seen all the rebel Batteries and then we came to blockade and after running along all the boys cheered us and after coming up to the gun boat stars and stripes they cheered and fired their cannons but this is a very fine place hear we are once more on solid ground and we are camp about a mile above the town of newbern on a hill and the fifty first Pennsylvania right above us and the apples are half grown out ant the peaches too and the blackberries are ripe and plenty of them too and some very nice trees here too full of birds and flowers we are laying near the new fort which is a splendid place and the nigers are still working at it yet But I must come to speedy close give my best respects to all my acquaintances and friends
So adieu
From Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct your letters to Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48 Regt P.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
Burnsides Expedition
            Newbern N.C.
            via New York

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32. June 1, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near New Bern
June 1st 1862
Dear Father
            Sir with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further I Received your kind letter Dated May 18th 1862 and was glad to hear from you I also received five P.O. Stamps in your letter I feel very tired to night after walking some ten miles to day I was all over the battle ground to day which is a very strong fortified and a rifle pit about three miles long and trees cut down in all directions to keep our troops from and where the cannons were placed the trees are all full of bullet holes and the ground covered with canister the banks of the Neuse River are fortified and Burnsides build three new forts there since he took this place Yesterday we had a Grand Review the line was formed in Broad Street we on the right of the first Brigade and the fifty first Penna and right of the second Brigade But we were nearly tired out marching through the town and general Nagle at the head we crossed the new Bridge across the trent River which the rebels had burned down but the bridge and Rail Roads are nearly finished but for the place I have to praise it every thing nice and green the plums are ripe here and appels and peaches half grown out Blackberries and Huckel Berries ripe and plenty to at first when we removed to New Bern we laid near the Neuse River But since we moved across the trent River But I must bring my letter to a close for I have nothing else to wright But give my love to mother Brothers sisters write soon
From your afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct your letter to me
Company E 48 Regt P.V.
Burnsides Expedition
New Bern NC
via New York


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33. June 16, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Nagle
June 16th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Last night was the awfulest night that I ever seen in my life The lightning was the worsed and the rain poured down in torrent I was walking around town this forenoon but all is quite here at present Last week I seen the first Engine since I left home and I was surprised in town to say I was walking along one of my comrades called me to see a allegator which is the awfulest looking creture I ever seen he is seven feet long and also very thick the drum are rattling all long and Regements passing out for brigade drill As I was writing the drummed rolled and I got up to see what was going on the Second Maryland Passed by from a funeral of one of their Brother Soldiers The health of this Regiment is good only a few sick We are going to get the Enfield Rifle tomorrow and then we will have the right kind of gun But I must Bring this to a close by sending my love to all
I Still Remain Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy

In care of Capt. Winlack
Company E 48 Regt. P.V.
Burnsides Expedition
Newbern N.C.
via New York
P.S. The 1st Brigade 2nd Division Pass now
James Greener sends his best Respects to you
D.E.R.

* * * * * * * * * *


34. June 21, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Nagle
June 21st 1862
Dear Father
            Sir with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further I Received your kind Dated June 8th and was glad to hear that you were all well And as you stated about two letters in may I Received them and then stamps too. Yesterday we had a grand review twelve thousand soldiers in the field General Burnsides was presented with a splendid sword from The citizens of Rhode Island the sword costed Eight hundred Dollars and General Burnsides made a speech in the middle of the field and I can Tell you it was a splendid sight one regiment of marenes were in the field too To-day we received our new Enfield Rifles and so we are now fully equiped and ready for the field But by all appearance this state will come into the Union and lay down their arms. You ought to see our camp how much we have every thing in order trees planted all around our tents for shade and we have very little to do [?] since we are here only three hour a day and one Brigade drill a week and plenty to eat and drink here fresh Bread every other day and as you spoke about a [?] [?] we had none hear But we have some very Thunder storms here and it rains very heavy too. But I must soon come to a close for the drum will soon roll for roll call and we must [?] very stricked here and have the light out at taps Please to send me Three one cent stamps I would like to send you a few of our New Bern Progress
Give my love to mother
From your affectionated son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to new bern as before


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35. June 28, 1862
To Brothers and Sisters/Donaldson, PA
Camp Nagle
June 28th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present I received your kind letter dated June 22nd and was glad to hear from you And as you wanted to know about the high water here The water was no higher than it was before But We had a very heavy thunder storm But it did not raise the rivers a bit We are now under marching order and we dont know I soon we will have to go from here But we had a great time here to-day we had a sham battle to-day we fired eighty rounds and we stood for five hour we are ready sharp shooter Our rifles have sight to aim at any distance from one hundred up to one Thousand yard and a very sure aim Kingston is in our Possesion now it was taken this week and I think that we will move up there too but we dont know where we are going But I hope that we are not going to Salisbury for our Boat cant run there Give my Best Respects to Joel Hatter
From your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy

Camp Nagle
June 28th 1862
Dear Sisters
            I Received your welcome message and was glad to hear that you were all well at home But I cant come home untill the fourth of July Tell Samuel that I could not get a gun for him now cherries are gone here Pears and appels are rips and plenty of them too And Every thing is nice here and we have a splendid place here too Plenty to Eat and drink and we are all in good health and in good spirits too all eager to get into a fight But we have no Onions and salid here and no Garden vegtitables of any kind here But I must close Give my Best Respects to Old Mary and all knowing friends James Greener send his best Respects to you
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
I received a letter from Mrs. A.E. Wehry



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36. July 5, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Newbern
July 5th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present You maybe heard that we were under marching orders now I will tell you how we spend our fourth on the second day of July we went on board the steamer Cossack but we did not know where we were going too So we anchored in the mouth of the neuse river when they opened the sealed order then we found out that we were going to fortress monroe So all the boats started off as hard as they could go but at hatteras we had to cast anchor as we could not go across the bar and then the Steamer Alice Price ran up and told us to run back to Newbern that McClellan was in Richmond and so we are again in our old place and spend our fourth of the water in a steamer and I guess we will lay here now a few months longer. The inhapitance of this town are coming back every day our Whole Division was along with us our Ship was the flag ship of the fleet Please to let me know all the news in your next letter Every one was anxious to get away from here but they did not like to go to Fortress Monroe but we dont know how long we are going to stay in this camp Just now we got orders to go on another march two days cooked rations and two raw But where we dont know but they say that we are on board of the Cossack I guess that we will got to Fortress Monroe But I must come to a close
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy

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37. July 11, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy
July 11th 1862
Camp near Newport News
Dear Brother
            I once more seat myself to write these few lines to you Hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present. Further we are now in Old Virginia camped in a Wheat field I will tell you about our trip and how we fared on the fifth day of July we got orders to pack our things and on the Sixth Sunday morning we went on board the steamer Cossack and started again for Hatteras and reached there next morning and stuck on the bar and had to lay there untill Evening and then we started for Fortress Monroe and reached there next day at twelve O.clock and layed there all night next morning we had to get thirty tons of coal on board and in the Evening we started for Newport news and landed here at Eight Oclock in the Evening and came up into this field and laid on the ground all night But now our Camp is in good trim again But we had hard times on the steamer they say that we are to strike at Fort Darling and drive them from there we dont know if it is true General Burnsides is hear and Reno this is the finest place we camped yet and the best water too better than we had since we are in the service Every thing in good appearance and nearly all in good health and cheer We are exspecting more troops hear every day The are still only two Penns Regtiment hear But we hope to meet more of them before long But we dont know for sure where we are going to there are a great many boat here and a British man of war is laying at the fort Old abe passed at the fortress and one gun boat fired twenty one guns for a salute and such a cheering I never heard before I never was in better health then I was since I left home but I must close hoping to hear from you soon
I still Remain your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy

Direct your letter to
Company E 48 Regt P.V.
Newport News Va
via Fortress Monroe
Or where ever stationed


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38. July 18, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Newport News
July 18th 1862
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seat myself to write these few lines to you Hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further I let you know that we are still laying hear And dont know when we are going from here or where to But the talk is that we are going to Fort Darling but we are satisfied to any where Last week the news come into Camp that they were raising a Regular Regiment and about half of our Regement were going to join them for three years more Every thing is going on fine hear Every thing quite Apples all ripe and plenty of plums Yesterday some of our boys were run out of Tobacco So they whent to town and stole three boxes and four rolls of cheese and that is the way we fix the traitors store keepers in this place There are still more troops landing hear every day and some of them are going right up the James River on to McClellan and some are going to Norfolk to land there we are all in good health and spirits and all in good cheer. But I must tell you something about this place Every morning when we go down for water the negro school goes in and such a school you never seen about nine Oclock they have recess then you aught to see all the wool running around town Please to tell Samuel Reed that I got a letter today from an unknown friends Which stated that Franklin P. Hetrick was badly wounded and that he fell in the hands of the Rebels and that they did not hear any thing from him since then and as he he could not say where he was but he said that he thought F.P. Hetrick was in Richmond before them. But I must come to a close for the time is getting late
I still Remain your afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48 Regt P.V.
Newport News Va
via Fortress Monroe
Or forwarded where ever
stationed
Please to give me all the dates of the letters that I sent home


* * * * * * * * * *



39. July 22, 1862
To Sister Sarah J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Newport News
July 22nd 1862
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further I received your kind letter dated July 11th 1862 And was very glad to hear from home As I wrote seven letters home and Received no answer from any one of them and I would like to know wether you Received them and what date they were wrote on as I have all the dates of all the letters wrote home I would like to know where Dan Weahry was shot and when. We are still all in good health and spirits and Every day more troops coming in there are now five Pennsylvania Regiments here and a great many other Regiments in all about fifteen thousand I can tell you that we have great times hear one week seams no longer than one day at home I think that these seven month passed away the fastest Every day we go out for Pears and apples which are plenty hear and all ripe and every thing Else is plenty here we Sorry to say that Major D Nagle Resigned and is going home. I hear every day of some one of my old acquaintances Either killed or wounded Please to give my kind love to Mother and tell her that I am all right and not to fret for me for all we trust in is in God and keep our powder dry. Last Sunday Chaplain Meridith of the fiftieth Regt. Preached in a square. he is the same preacher that yoused to preach in Tremont some time ago. But I must soon bring my letter to a close By sending my kind love to Brothers Sisters Father & Mother Give my best Respects to Joel Hatter also to old Mary So I close this Hoping to hear from you every week As the letters come hear in three days. I will write every time
I still Remain your
Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48 Regt P.V.
Newport News Va
Via Fortress Monroe

We are in our tents the doors closed
and we dont know what
time we may be called on
to march away to Richmond
Write soon as this is the Eighth letter without an answer Write soon
I also received three one cents stamps in your letter D.E.R.
Write soon 


* * * * * * * * * *


40. August 6, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Fredericksburg Va
August 6th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir
            With pleasure I seat myself once more to write a few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of good health. Further I have a great deal to tell you. Just before we left newport news we got orders to get one days rations in our haversack and to strap our blanket on our backs so we form line our whole brigade and started off on foot and we keeped on marching untill two o.clock then we halted for thre hours and then we started again and marched to Warwick Court house and halted for the night going nineteen miles and then next morning we started back for camp and when we came as far as Youngs Mills there the battries starded and run along the hill for miles and all the apples and fruit we pulled as a caution but a good many of the boys gave out and when we came back to camp there every one was excited as they heard that we had a fight but We only seen two Rebels which were brought to camp and send to fortress Monroe and from there to . . .[letter seems to be incomplete]. . .
            On the second day of August we went on board the cossack and started from Fortress Monroe and the we cast anchor some time through the night we started and in the morning we found ourselves on the chesapeak and that day we run up the Potomac and next day we landed at Acquia Creek and went on the cars and run to Fredericksburg where we are camped now, Which is a fine place on board the steamer one out of co. D shot himself and died next morning But I must close my letter
I still Remain Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct o me
            Company E 48 Regt. P.V.
                        Fredericksburg
                                    Va
            Via Washington D.C.
            In care of Capt. Wm. Winlack
            Burnsides Expedition



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41. August 12, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Fredericksburg Va
August 12th 1862
Dear Father
            With pleasure I write these few lines I Received your kind letter yesterday Dated July 20 I was glad to hear that you were all getting well at home But I must state that I am sick for seven days now but I am getting better again and I hope that I will be fit for duty in a few days I allso received four one cents and three three cents stamps and was very glad to receive them but I have no news of any kind to tell only that they are capturing Guarilla bands every day and bringing in here and we were under marching orders all last week but last night they were countermanded just before we left newport news we present our worthy captain with a splendid sword which cost one hundred and five dollars the most elegant sword in this regement Please to let me know if any more of the boys from town are listing and if there is any talk about drafting around. there and How Ben and George are making out I just had seen it in the journal that [?] Wehry was shot Give my best respects to all neighbors Please to give me all the news from town next time.
I still Remain your Afflictionated son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
C.E. 48 Regt. P.V.
Fredericksburg, VA
via Washington, D.C.
            In care of Capt. Winlack


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42. September 18, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Parole
September 18th 1862
Dear Father
            With pleasure I seat myself once more to let you know my present Situation as I think that you are all anxious to hear from me I was sick at Fredericksburg and in the hospital and left behind the regement and on the 15th of August I was sent on to Culpepper and there Joined my Company but they had marching orders and left that Evening and I was to weak to follow up so me and Elijah Knight were left behind and on the 19th of August we were captured by the Rebels and send on to Richmond and I could not get a chance to write home. I am as well again now as ever But I tell you we had hard times there near starved to death some days we only got 1/4 of a loaf of Bread such loads as you buy in Tremont for five cents. Flour 24 Dollars a Barrel pies 40 cts sugar 1.10 cts a pound and Every thing else is high and sunday a week we were sent to city point and took our steamers and were sent in to Annapolis as paroled prisoners of war and we are all nearly naked and very hard up I would be very thankful if you would send me a few Dollars and dont forget to put paper and Envelopes in your letter and let me know where our Regiment lays. Please to let George Weist know that his brother Philip is hear to and well. I have no more to day at present let me here right away give my best respects to all
From your afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to
Camp Parole
Annapolis, Maryland


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43. September 28, 18682
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
            Camp near Alexandria
September 28th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir With pleasure I seat myself to write these few lines hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further we are mooving around every day and I cant tell you where to direct your letter too so that I can hear from home for I am very anxious to hear and I will get the direction to here and you write right away We are all encamped here now but we dont know what day we will move again as we were moved all around. I have no news of any importance to write but I hope that all my Sisters & Brothers are all well and also Father & Mother I will tell you something more about Richmond it is very dirty hole all the people are lousey and there soldiers too and we are all full too now But we will yet new cloth this week and then I think we can get them away again. the Rebel Soldiers get no cloth of the government and so there are as hard a looking set I ever seen in my life. When we were taken prisoners we got nothing to eat for four days then I beg two crackers from a Rebel Soldier and he gave one half of a chicken and then that was all I got for that day then we got too Richmond where we a little to eat but nothing to drink but Water and that was off the James River that poor that you could hardly drink it and if you wanted to buy any thing you had to pay double price for it I seen one Dollar paid for a ten cent loaf of bread and rye bread at that But I guess I will soon get an oppertunity to get too where I can hear from you every week for you dont know how lonesome I feel at present for I aint right well but for all I cant say that I am sick We are all paroles and I would like to know you see any thing in the papers about us being exchanged or whether we are going to be sent to our own states please to let me know but I must soon close my letter for it is getting late Give my best respects to Mr. & Mrs. Reid and let me know all the news at home and give my best Respects to Joseph Athey and all other good acquaintances and except a good share youself. So Good by I wish you would send me a sheet of paper & Envelope and stamp in your letter
I Still Remain you you afflictionated
Brother        Daniel E. Reedy
Direct your letter to me I guess you dont need to answer this letter I will try and write an other one in few days as I cant get the Direction They direct to Daniel E. Reedy Camp of Exchanged Prisenors near Alexandria Va you can please yourself to write or not.


* * * * * * * * * *


44. October 7, 1862
To Brother Samuel M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Banks
October 7th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir with pleasure I seat myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you in a better state of health than this leaves me at present for I am not well this long time And I cannot tell you what is wrong with me if I go out for water I can hardly walk to the well and back I get such a pain in my knees that I nearly break down. We have plenty to eat at present but I cannot eat the pork and crackers and so I can hardly live I will allso tell you that we received our new cloth yesterday or only a part of them I got a overcoat Dress coat pant shirts and a hat and we got no shoes nor blanket and so we nearly freeze at night time in our tents for it is very cold hear at night and warm in the day time Every thing is cheap hear and those that have a little money can live like Gentleman Mackeral they buy for two cents a piece apples and peaches are high that is the only thing that is high hear We are mooving our camp Every Sixth day to a new place to keep healthy but for all some of us are sickly We are nearly all getting sick of a Soldier's life laying hear nothing to do only lay on our backs and cook our Vituals And I would like to come home for a short time but cannot get a chance I tried my best to get a furlough to get home but they refused me. I guess Mr. Weist is at home by this time and you received your likeness that I send to you they are from a secesh and I hope you want [?] them I would but I must soon come to a close for my letter is getting to long but I hope to hear some good news from home and hope to find you all well and plenty of Every thing. please to let me know wehter you seen anything about us being Exchanged or not we cannot find it out hear and we would like to know if it is true but I can tell you we have fine times hear Give my Best Respects to Mrs. Reed and Mrs. Reed allso to Samuel
From Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel Emanuel Reedy


* * * * * * * * * *


45. October 10, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp of Paroled Prisernors
October 10th 1862
Dear Father
            Sir With trembling hand I seat myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you all in A better state of health than this leaves me at present. As I am very weak at present I have such an awful pain on my breast. And I would be very glad to see you There are some coming every day to see there friends. And I would allso like you to find out where our Regement lies and let me know as soon as Possible I can tell you that all of us prisenors are getting tired out and would all like to go home as we are treated very bad at present hardly Enough to Eat and no blankets to cover us at night time A great many of the boys listed in the sixteenth Virginia and Received twenty five Dollars bounty. But that is something that I will not do I dont want to break my oath which I took on Bell Island But if I was Exchanged I would join in a minute or else go back to my old Regement. Yesterday I counted fourteen Hospital wagon's passing through. Camp loaded with sick for Washington But I dont want to go there I got enough when I was there before. So you can think that a great many of the boy's are sick hear most of them have the Rheumatism So that they cannot walk any from laying on the ground without cover or any thing to spread under them only a few leaves that we hunt up. Tell Mother that I was very hungry for some of her pies and Bread but was sorry to say that I had none of it to eat and no way to get any hear And please to let me know how my Brothers Samuel & Aaron are coming on And give my kind love to John and all my Sisters allso my love to you and my Dear Mother But dont forget to send me a few stamps Let me allso know how the times are in town and tell Aaron that I was looking for A present from him untill the sixth of the next month. But I must close my letter Give my best Respects to all Acquaintances
I still Remain Yours
Afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
Camp of Paroled Prisenors
Camp Banks
Alexandria, Va.

* * * * * * * * * *



46. October 24, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp in Pleasant Valley
October 24th 1862
Dear Father
            With pleasure I set myself to answer your kind letter Which I Received on the 17th of October and I was very glad to hear that you were all well and I hope that this may find you in good health as this leaves me at present. I allso got the one Dollars and five, Postage Stamps. I am now along with my company again and I got all the letters that you send to the Regiment And I was glad to hear that you were all well at home and getting along well but I cant write any more, for the mail is ready to start.
But I hope to hear from you soon
From your son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
Company E 48 Regt
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
            Via Washington D.C.
Forwarded wherever stationed

* * * * * * * * * *



47. November 17, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
In Camp near Warrington
November 17th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir with pleasure I seat myself to answer your kind and welcome letter and I hope that this may find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further I would have answered your before now but we are on a march every day and a great part of the night So I had no time to write but I will try to write Every week if I possible can I allso received a letter from L.S. Reed And I could not get time to answer it. Please to tell Joseph Athey to write and that I would tell him some thing in my letter. I Received Sister Lizzie Likeness from the Captain as soon as I Joined my Regement and was glad to hear from you and I hope that you will not forget to write Every week. Day before yesterday the Rebels started to shell our Amunition train but they did not captured any of our Wagons and then we started to shell them presently the shells came over our heads. all at once we were ordered to Load When some thing came rip rip rip over our heads then you aught to have seen our Colonel how he flew around but Every thing is quite now Please to tell mother to send me a flannel shirt and a good pair of gloves for the winter a red flannel one tell father to roll it up in a small bundle and to send it by mail as our boys get them every mail but I must close my letter for we will leave in a few minutes so good by
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct your letter to me
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
via Washington D.C.

Please to write soon

* * * * * * * * * *



48. November 23, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Fredericksburg
November 23rd 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present. I forgot to tell you that we were in a fight at Amisville in my last latter we had quite a skirmish in the after noon but we lost no men on our side we allso had a skirmish at sulphur springs Last week and we are expecting a fight here every day as we and the rebels can talk together and they say that we lost our best general But we dont think so our self but they say that they are ready for us. We are allso ready for them we are supporting a Battery and we are camped by ourselves And so we have fine times just now but we had hard times on the march but we can stand a few weeks untill we come to Richmond which is sixty miles from here but we have to start the rebels first. We have received no pay since last July and we are pretty hard up for money as we have no sutler so we cannot buy any paper are any thing else and all the boy's are hard up for paper Last week I found seventeen sheets of paper and I shared it out to the boy's all except three sheet's which I kept for myself even the captain came for a sheet of Paper. But I hope that we will be paid before long. Please to let me know how all the boy's are coming on and how you like to go to school tell Samuel that I had a nice present for him that I would send it to him as soon as  I could get to a good place as we dont know how long we are going to stay here We are under marching orders all the time But I must soon close my letter By sending my best Respects to Father and Mother Sisters and Brothers allso to Old Mary the Shoemaker as the Rebel said have you got any coffee over thar we will give you a gallon of whiskey for a pound of coffee. Now you Yankey's have to draft your Paddies
I still Remain your Brother
Direct to me                Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48 Regt. P.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
Via Washington, D.C. 



* * * * * * * * * *


49. November 27, 1862
To Brother Samuel M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Fredericksburg
November 27th 1862
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further we are still in sight of the Rebels and Expect and engagement every day as they are throwing up Entrenchments all around the town and we see more troops coming in every day Yesterday some of the boy's asked the Rebel pickets wether they would let them come back if they would come over to traid Sugar and coffee for Tobacco They allowed they would so they started over and they come back with plenty of tobacco and Rebels offered them ten dollars for a pair of shoes but they would not sell them we have great times here Tearing down houses and every thing also we are supporting a battery and we have only one drill a day and dress parade
November 28th Last night five of us started to forage by orders of the Captain so we came to a pig pen and we left out three hogs and killed the three and fetched them to camp and we got four bushels of mush to eat so we are making pawn hause (?) this morning So you can see that we dont starve we steal every thing that we come across but now I dont now what more to say but I will tell you that the rebels are getting mighty thick on the other side of the river but we are mighty strong here too I see some of the boy's from town every day they are all well and hearty Please to give my best Respects to Joseph Athey, and tell him that I would like to hear from him once again Please to let me know all the news about town I seen in the paper that Jacob Reedy of Port Carbon was drafted I would like to know if it was uncle Jacob let me know how the times are at home I must close my letter
From your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
via Washington D.C.


* * * * * * * * * *


50. December 1, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Fredericksburg
December 1st 1862
Dear Father
            Sir
            With pleasure I seat myself to write these few lines to you in answer of your kind letter dated November and I hope that this may find in the same state health as this leaves me at present I allso received a letter dated August 10th from John & S.S. Reed Directed to Fredericksburg. As you say I never mentioned how I joined my Regement I mentioned it in a letter from Pleasant Valley I was Exchanged Twenty five hundred of us left Washington at one time to join our Regements under Colonel Lesher Please to let me know in what Regiment Uncle Jacob and them are in as I might get a chance to see them sometimes as they are sending the new Regiments all down here. The Shirt and gloves you can send by mail I am very bad off for the gloves for the weather is getting cold down here in Dixie But we cannot get any express here I allso Received five Postage stamps in your kind letter I will try and write home every week if I can get a chance to do so but when we are on a march we do not get time please to let my know wether you draw my pay in Pottsville Every month for there is some of our boys Say that it was stoped on them. I cannot give you much news from here this time for it is all quite hear only our pickets and theirs have a little fun sometimes but there is no shooting going on now but I guess the the ball will open soon as we are throwing up Entrenchments Every night for to plant some cannon We are nearly all is good health and spirits and all anxious to get our pay as we were not paid since we left newport news we have good times again but dont know how long they will last you never mentioned in any one of your letters how Samuel and Aaron are coming on I would like to know something about them sometimes too But I must come to a close
I Still Remain your afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
via Washington D.C.
Please to let me know wether Levi Miller is at home yet
            D.E. Reedy



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51. December 9, 1862
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
In Camp near Fredericksburg
December 9th 1862
Dear Brother
            Sir
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of as this leaves me at present. We are still in the old camp But we are under marching orders now and we dont know how Soon we will go away Yesterday we started to put up winter quarters But I guess we will have to leave them again this is the Second time we started to fix ourselves for winter I guess the third time we will stop but I hope it will be Further south for it is very cold here the ground is covered with snow and very cold nights now. Day before yesterday we went out on picket and we were nearly all frozen it is very cold on the hands and feet for the government stockens are not quite as warm as mother's were at home But after we got the next lot of shows I will wear two pair of stockens now I have no Drawers to wear nor undershirt to wear but we are Expecting to get them every day But we are not been paid since last July so you see we have no chance to buy any thing the pay master was hear And paid some of the Regement's and then he was ordered back to Washington And we have not seen him Since Last night two men out of the Seventh Rhode Island Regiment were frozen to death in their tent  So you can thing that it is cold hear But I tell you the Rebels are as quite as mice in Fredericksburg the night we were on picket they called to us have you got any coffee over their. And we told them that we had plenty So they offered us tobacco for coffee and we asked them how coffee and sugar sold over there they told us that coffee was two Dollars a pound and very hard to get for that price and Sugar one Dollar and fifty cents a pound and that they had no coffee for seven weeks nor even seen any they belong to a Mississippi Regiment and they are very hard up for clothing too offering ten dollars for a pair of shoes But I guess I have nearly told you enough about the Rebels. I will tell you some thing more about the sheep and chickens how we fix them At night about six start in one direction and six in another and if we meet a sheep or a pig we strike it with a ax as we carry one for that purpose and then we cut off the head and skin it and carry it to camp and if you don't meet any pigs or sheep we go on untill we come to a farmers house and then one of us will go in and talk to the farmer if he is at home while the other five will steal chickens and then one more of them will come in and make out that he is a guard and he will arrest the other fellow and take him off that is the way we fix the Rebel farmers in this part of the country we live like gentlemen hear But After we get across the Rappahannock River I [?] our sport will be spoiled. Please to tell Joseph Athey to write to me Last night I had a great dream about home I seen Sister's Sarah and Hannah only for that I would have forgotten to mention [?] [?] [?] again Give my best respects to my Brothers Aaron and Samuel allso to Father and mother Likewise to Sister Elizabeth and Lydia Reed and Samuel S. Reed allso to Mr. and Mrs. Reed Allso to Cousin Matilda. Please to let me know if [?] Wehry is at home I heard that he was going home but I must close my letter soon
I Still Remain your affectionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct your letter to me
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
First Brigade Second Division
Ninth Army Corps
via Washington D.C.



* * * * * * * * * *

52. December 16, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
In Camp near Fredericksburg
December 16th 1862
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seat myself once more to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present. Further your letter bearing date December fifth was received with pleasure and was very glad to hear from home And was very glad to hear that you were al well now I will tell you something about the fight at Fredericksburg on the Eleventh of the month Early in the morning a very heavy cannonading took place and about Eight o clock we were ordered out but we laid in the Reserve all day and at night we came to our old camp Early next morning we started again and crossed the River on a pontoon bridge and laid there all night next morning we started again but were halted again and laid until near dinner time then we were ordered to the front and when we came in sight of the Rebels they opened up with shell so we were ordered to lay down but they were still shelling us wounded some of our men and then we started off again never stop untill we came up to the place where we opened fire on them and soon silenced one of their batteries and just as it was getting dark we were Relieved by the one hundred and sixty third new york and they made a very poor stand so we came in town again we fired our Sixty rounds of cartridges On Sunday morning we got forty Rounds more but were left lay in town all day and night and laid there all Monday untill dark when we started out again and marched up in front of the Rebs and started to throw up Entrenchments and about twelve O clock we were ordered to fall back across the River again So we started off again I can tell you It is a horrible sight to see the men laying wounded and killed on the field And I can tell you they were a great many wounded in the fight and a good many killed they were two men killed by my side and I was hid twice by a piece of shell but it did not hurt me thank God that I Escape this time we got five men wounded in our company We now have twenty two men in our company. I seen men laying with their heads blowed off and women cut in two with shell. We found Every thing plenty in town except coffee and clothing. We took all the flour and meat we were baking day and night We got some very valuable things. I had a silver cup and six silver spoons and and very fine shawl but I lost them when we were going into the fight and my blanket and all other things I have now a lot off Likeness so I will try to send them home I will Mail them they are all secesh I have a one hundred year Calendar And some other small things now I tell you we had plenty of flour meat Tobacco Sugar preserves and all other good things to eat And we had all kinds of books and we lived in the houses yousing the furniture we had a jolly time off it Now I must come to a close for this time hoping to hear from home soon again Give my best to all friends
I still Remain your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
First Brigade Second Division
Ninth Army Corps
via Washington


* * * * * * * * * *


53. December 26, 1862
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Opposite Fredericksburg
December 26th 1862
Dear Father
            With pleasure I seated myself once more to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further I Received the Flannel shirt for a Christmas present and your kind letter Bearing date December 22nd it was Received last night with pleasure all ten Postage Stamps now I have no news to tell you at present for all is quite hear nothing going on now I will tell you how I spend my christmas in the morning when I got up I looked at the colonels quarters And I see a very splendid christmas tree fixed up by some of the boys The next was fall in for your whiskey which was the third time that we got since we are in the service about nine O clock we got another drink and then the next was Dinner which was fresh beef and Rice soup and potatoes which we get very seldom here and so that was what we had for christmas. this morning I was over to the 50th P.V. and I seen Captain Gaskins and he told me that you were all well now I will send a likeness in this letter for Samuel and if you Please to send me a small sum of money it would come very usefull to me to buy ink and pens and I would like to get my Likeness taken to sent home we have no hopes of being paid yet But I must close my letter By sending my kind love to mother Brothers and Sisters
I still Remain your
Afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
First Brigade Second Division
Ninth Army Corps
via Washington D.C.
P.S. The wether is very cold here but no snow



* * * * * * * * * *

1863


54. January 12, 1863
To B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA

January 12th 1863
Dear Father
            With pleasure I seat myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present. I received your kind letter dated January 4th also the 1.50 cents and the 5 postage stamps and was glad to hear from home. we are not paid yet but we expect to get paid every day so you need not send any money at present and my likeness I will send to you for mother as soon as I can get a pass to go to Falmouth for I cannot get it taken here I did not received the package containing the gloves yet but I guess it will reach me before long I will let you know in my next letter now you also state in your letter that it would take a small regiment to fetch the drafted men out I think they aught to take us home to fetch them out for they would not take the guns from us. you allso state about uncle jacob now I would like to know his Directions for I would write to them now I am on picket duty I can see the gray backs walking around with their guns on backs but they do not offer to fire across at us but they have the road lined with rifle pits I guess they intend to do Something before long Mr Lowe goes up in his balloon almost every day and he says that they are falling back from Spottsylvania heights where we were obliged to fall back to the junction twelve miles from here but I think we can drive them from there I have nothing more particular to write for this time every think is quite hear now I guess the boys at home are all going to school now for I never get a letter from them now but they must not expect to get a letter from me. I send home a Testament that got in the odd fellow's hall in the city of Fredericksburg I guess you got it before now I got a little thing that I would like to send to you but I am afraid it will be lost I can get five dollars for it here but I want to keep it myself But I must bring my letter to a close By sending my kind love to you and mother Brothers and sisters So adieu
From your afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before


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55. January 16, 1863
To Hannah M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Falmouth
January 16, 1863
Dear Brother & Sister
            With pleasure I seat myself to write these few lines to you hoping to find you in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present I received your kind letter Dated January 11th and was glad to hear from you. David Williams is hear he was not wounded I guess not seen in fathers letter that I received the money but not the gloves and I have not got them yet But maybe they are in camp for we are on picket duty yet but we will be relieved to-morrow at Eleven Oclock we are in sight of the graybacks just now we were over the river under a flag of truce and brought over some women and some of their papers but I cannot tell you any news of any importance the negroes are standing on guard along the river bank on the secesh side but I hope that this rebellion will soon be brought to a close for I am getting tired of it now if we go into winter quarters I will get a furlough to come home but if we stay here in our small shelder tents we cannot get home now it might be that we will moove next week I would like to have Samuels likeness I think you would hardly know me if you would see me in the street at home I weigh now one hundred and thirty five pounds and am gaining every day the secesh cavelry is now looking across the river there are some of our boys getting their Discharge every day too and going home I would like to know if Jacob Lehman got wounded or if he got home now if I get along as good as I do now I would not care to be a Soldier for my life time James Greener sends his best respects to you and all the rest of the boys and girls give my kind love to father mother sisters & Brother
So I must close
From Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before. 


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56. January 25, 1863
To sister Sarah Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Near Falmouth
January 25th 1863
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present I received your letter dated January 17th and was glad to hear from you Please to tell mother that I cannot get a pass for to go and get my likeness but as soon as I get a chance I will send it to mother I did not receive them gloves yet I guess they have gone astray Tell mother that the weather is fine hear and not cold any more But we had some cold days allready but I think they are all over But about coming home I dont know when that will be before long Every thing is quite here again Since Burnsides was stuck in the mud again So that we will get the Reb's away from here before the weather gets too warm for the weather get very warm here in summer last August when we laid hear we could hardly stand it in our tends. Give my best Respects to all the boys and to father and mother I have nothing else to write this time.
            I still remain your afflictionated Brother
D.E. Reedy
Direct as before

* * * * * * * * * *


[In Same Envelope]
January 25, 1863
To "Brother"
January 25th 1863
Dear Brother
            I Received your letter and was glad to hear that you were going to school now I will tell you we only had two small snows out here this winter and I hope we will have no more for I do not like to stand guard on a cold night or go on picket.
From your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy


* * * * * * * * * *

57. January 30, 1863
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Near Falmouth
January 30th 1863
Dear Father
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping to find you all in good health as this leaves me at present Your letter of the 26th was Received last night and I was glad to hear that you were all well But I did not Received the gloves and stockings yet. I allso Received six postage stamps in your letter but I was glad to hear they were arresting the Deserter and Drafted men for they are a good many Deserted out of our Regiment now there is no news hear at present Since General Hooker took command every thing is very quite here Day before yesterday were visited with quite a snow storm the snow was about six inches deep but it is nearly all gone again but the roads are very muddy now which will delay us again for a while but I hope that this Rebellion will soon get a death blow. I think the next move that the army of the Potomac will make will give them a death blow. But the ninth corps do not like to loose their rowdy Burnsides for he is a noble commander allso Sumner he is one of our Generals belonging to the ninth corps
Robert Rogers has not yet reached the Regiment
But I must soon bring this letter to a close But as you mentioned in your letter about a furlough that is no go hear except you get a arm or leg shot off We have a good many hear with there fingers off but they cannot get home. Our Colonel is gone home But I do not know for what Give my kind love to Sisters and Brothers allso to mother
From your afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy

Direct as before


* * * * * * * * * *

58. February 7, 1863
To brother Samuel/Donaldson
Camp near Falmouth
February 7th 1863
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I Seat myself to write these few lines to you Hoping this to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further I Received your kind letter Dated February 1st and was glad to hear that you were all well We had snow and rain hear these last two weeks but now it is fair again Tell Red[?] that out hear we can catch foxes and Rabbits without dog or guns. Now I must tell you that we are going to leave hear again in a day or two But we do not know where we are going to go to the report is that we are going to Fortress Monroe to Report to General Dix but we dont know if it is true But I hope it is true We are all in good spirits Last week I Received a letters from you and Samuel Reed Dated Oct 19th Directed to camp parole Alixandria I have not much more to write this time So I hope you will excuse me for not writing more Give my kind love to father and mother
From your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before


* * * * * * * * * *


59. February 13, 1863
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Newport News
February 13th 1863
Dear Brother
            Sir: With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping this to find you in same state of good health as this leaves me at present. Further we left camp near Fredericksburg on the ninth of this month and landed here on the Eleventh where we are encamped now. We expect to have better time now There is no news of any kind here at present So I will write but a little this time Please to send me a little money for we are hard up now Every thing is cheap hear Please to let me know how Coffee and sugar sells at home for I heard that it was very high Give my best respects to father and mother, sisters and Brothers so I must close Mr Rogers arrived here to-day.
From your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
Company E 48th Regt PV
            Newport News Va
                        Via Fortress Monroe
            In care of Capt Winlack


* * * * * * * * * *


60. February 19, 1863
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Newport News
February 19th 1863
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping this to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present. Every thing is quite hear and all the troops in good humer and spirits to-morrow we are eighteen months in the service trying to free the negro but no go to-day we waited the the water knee deep for to go on picket where we are now. Every thing is very cheap hear Yesterday we got new tents we only had shelder tents all winter now we have the A Tent five of us are in one and So you can think that we have great times at nights we are singing and hollowing until ten O.clock this is the third letter I wrote home and got no answer And I hope you will answer this right away for it makes me feel uneasy We make some great times here of the Bounty men they are all pedling pies and apples and charging double price for them So we upset them and take all from them Lord Massa dont shoot me I's only a poor neger Lord massa spair this child. Halt. Halt. Halt. I heard the Sentinel cry then the report of a gun so the negro bellowed out again Lord Massa I is shot hab mercy on me halt you Black Bucker or I will blow your brains out this time he shot the negro through the leg now I must close my letter by sending my kind love to father mother Sisters and Brother And except a due share yourself
From your afflictionated Brother
Daniel E Reedy

Direct as before



* * * * * * * * * *


61. February 25, 1863
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Newport News
February 25th 1863
Dear Father
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping this to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present. Further I received your kind letter dated Feb 25th and was glad to hear that you were all well I allso got the Dollar and a half and three Postage Stamps I was very thankfull for it And it gave me pleasure to hear that John was at work and Aaron going to school I was at the 132nd Regt the day before we left Fredericksburg and I did not see any one I know I was sorry to hear that uncle was in it But about laying down our arms the Secesh of Donaldson aught to have been hear today and see the Grand review of the ninth Corps there are some that are down on Lincoln's administration But there is not talk of laying down arms all the talk is on another fight. Yesterday I was loading ammunition we loaded fifty seven wagon's loads for our Division Every thing is cheap hear 15 apples for a quarter 3 pies for a quarter 4 loaves of bread for a quarter there is no news of any importance hear every thing is quite on the River the Iron glads are all laying hear ready for the Merrimac So I must close By sending by kind love to Sisters and Brothers and to mother
From your Affectionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
P.S. Tell Mr. Shoafstall that he aught to be out hear to hunt foxes



* * * * * * * * * *


62. March 2, 1863
To Sister Hannah M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Newport News
March 2nd 1863
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present Further I would like to know if Aaron received my letter dated Feb. 13 as I never heard in one of my letter We are still in our old camp twenty-five of us still Remain Save and Sound Thank God and we have plenty fun hear now playing ball and cricket and Jumbing about untill ten Oclock we have very little drilling to do at present Every thing is quite hear We have an Express boat Attached to our corps now so we still Expect to go further South but we are not sure yet I guess we can tell you before long where we are going too we are going to get new rifles again I guess they are going to give us another Show at the grey back's before long again there is nothing going on here at present fish we buy for twenty five cents a strong and very plenty they are a string gave five meals for two of us me and John Jones we bunk together this long time I got some Oysters cakes yesterday I guess you dont know what it is, it is an oyster baked like an apple dumpling I wish you could come hear and see Fortress Monroe and the Rip Raps and see the Rebel steamer make its appearance now I must close my letter By sending my kind love to Sisters and Brothers father and mother, So adieu.
From you Affectionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy


* * * * * * * * * *


63.  March 7, 1863
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Newport News
March 7th 1863
Dear Brother
            Sire With Pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this may find you all in the same state of health as this leaves me at present. Further I Received your kind letter dated March 1st and was glad to hear that you were all well you said that you were working Every day that was the reason you did not answer my letter I am drilling every day too for all I can find time to write two letters a week. I told you in my last letter that I got the money in the letter and about the weather it is very nice here now It is not very cold Uncle Jacob was hear this week he is well I did not know him for a long time at last he came and spoke to me then I knew he was one of my uncles but I did not know which one it was The measels are in the Regiment that is the only disease in our Regiment. Every one in our Company are well Please to let me know what the wages are at home in your next letter There are giving furloughs for ten days but I guess it is best for me to stay away from home if the small pox are so near the house Now I would like to know how Mr Stonewall & Jeff Davis and old Beauregard are in town no I must close my letter Joseph Lord Send his best Respects to Mr Samuel Whetstone and give my best Respects to him and Joseph Athey allso my Best Respects to Sisters and Brothers, Father and Mother Allso to Old Mary And tell Joseph Shoafstall that the foxes are very plenty here Every night that we are on picket We chase two are three We catched three all Ready since we are camp hear we have Good Times here every thing plenty of Negroes too But I must close my letter So Adieu
From Affectionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
Company E 48th Regt P.V.
            Newport News
                        Va
In care of Captain William Winlack
Via Fortress Monroe
            James Greener Sends his best respects to you
Write Soon again and give
my best respects to Lydia S. Reed


* * * * * * * * * *


64. March 12, 1863
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Newport News
March 12th 1863
Dear Father
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you all in good health as this leaves me at present Thank God I Received your kind letter Dated March 9th today and was glad to hear that you were all well. We were not paid yet and we dont know when we will be paid And as you stated about coming the army I will tell you the truth the wise men are all at home yet and the fools are in the army But I must say that it suits me to a T. But for a married man it is only a Bother always something wrong at home either the wife are one of the children Sick I know it in our own company they are some Copperheads in our Regement as B. Bannan called them I see the Journal every week But there is not any thing going on hear at present no news of any importance only there is another Monitor hear now called the Catskill there is nothing going on the Peninsula Give my kind love to mother allso to Brothers allso to Sisters So with this I must close my scribbling for this time
So Adieu
From Your Afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy

Direct as before


* * * * * * * * * *


65. March 20, 1863
To Sister Sarah M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
March 20th 1863
Newport News
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I Seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present I Received your kind letter dated March 16th and was glad to hear that you were all well. I have no news to write this time But we are going to move from hear before long there are a good many of the Regiments left allready But we do not know where we are going too Every thing is quite hear Tell Joseph Shoafstall that I would bring him a young Secesh along with me for to hunt foxes Last Sunday I was on picket and two foxes come up to me And I shot one of them with my rifle and as you said Muslin was 40 cents a yard the Muslin we use here is the musket which cost 18 Dollars and a few Cannons Maybe you think that I am tired of Soldiering I am not only I am sorry that Uncle Sam dont pay us now while we have a good place I think that if I would get home now I would list as a Marine on board of a Monitor my best Respects to Sarah and Mrs. Shoafstall. Daniel E. Reedy
            To Sister Hannah I Received your letter Dated March 14th Today Uncle Jacob came over from Norfolk to See us hear and I did not know him I am Sorry to hear that you was so small yet But I guess you will grow before long I hope that you will learn your hard lessen as well as we do learn to shoot Rebs I guess the town is nearly full of people now So that they will be no show for us This morning it started to hail but now it is snowing very fast and I think we will have a Sleigh ride yet this winter Give my Best Respects to Joseph Athey allso to Samuel Heffstrom Joseph Lord Send his best Respects to him Give my best Respects to Father mother Sisters and Brother and to old Mary So adieu
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before
John Jones sends his kind love to you



* * * * * * * * * *


66. March 25, 1862
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
The journey of the 48th Regt. P.V.
From Newport News to Lexington Ky
Wednesday March 25th 1863
We started from Newport News Va on board the Steamer John A. Werner and ran down to Fortress Monroe that night and anchored for the night The next morning we started for Baltimore at 4 O.Clock in the morning and reached Baltimore that night about 11 O.Clock and lay on the boat untill morning. When we landed and started for the depot about 8 O.Clock A.M. and got on the cars at 10 O.Clock We then started from Baltimore and came to Little York at 3 O.Clock P.M. Here the Citizens had some coffee made for us. we then past Harrisburgn at dark and ran all night. Saturday March 28th 1863 we then came to Altoona at 12 O.Clock M. There the citizens had coffee for us again we then crossed the Alleghany mountains and passed Johnstown before dark and reached Pittsburgh that night at 12 O.Clock and got of the cars and marched to the town hall where we had a splendid supper and then we changed cars and started at 4 O.Clock A.M. We then came to      where the government had coffee for us it was about 3 O.Clock P.M. we the started and came to Columbus Ohio that night at 12 O.Clock Hear the Citizens had bread and coffee for us they came to the cars and awakened us and treated is very kindly. We then Came to Cincinnati at 10 O.Clock A.M. we then marched up to the market house where we had a splendid dinner We then marched to Burnsides head Quarters and gave him three Cheers We then crossed the Ohio River on a ferry boat to Covington Ky where we took the care for Lexington Where we reached at 3 O.Clock A.M. we laid in the cars untill daylight when we got of and marched to the fair ground and fixed up our tents there was quite a snow storm that afternoon.
So this ends our Journey from Newport News Va to Lexington Ky.

Dear Brother
            Please to keep all these sheets from me As I want them when I get home I will send some more and every time we go on a March I will send you a copy.
            And Oblige Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy



* * * * * * * * * *


67. March 31, 1863
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Lexington Ky
March 31st 1863
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present Further I Received your kind letter dated March 22nd on the 35th but had no time to write to you for we started for Baltimore that afternoon and got their next night and next morning we got on the cars for Harrisburg and on the road there we came to Little York where the people had coffee ready for us and that night we got to Harrisburg but we not did stop but kept on the road for Pittsburgh on the road their we came to a town called Altoona where the people had coffee ready for us again then we came to Pittsburgh at 12 O clock at night where they had a splendid Supper ready for us in the town hall their we took the cars again for Cincinnati first we came to Stanton Ohio where they had coffee for us again and at Columbus they had Coffee and bread ready for us again then in Cincinnati they had a splendid Dinner ready for us after we had dinner we marched through the city and got on a ferry boat ant crossed over to Covington Kentucky and there we took the cars for Lexington where we arrived this morning and are camped about 3 miles from the city I can tell you we had a fine time of it this time and was treated first rate all along the road every thing was quite now I must close my scribbling for this time I hope you will answer soon again
From your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct your letter to me
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
Kentucky

* * * * * * * * * *



68. April 1, 1863
To Sister/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Lexington
April 1st 1863
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I Seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you in the same state as this leaves me at present I was going to write to you this long time but could not get time So this morning I thought that I would write a few lines to you We have our tents up again but we aint going to stop hear long we are going to drive Morgan's Gurillas out of Kentucky they are a great Secesh hear this morning I took a walk to the graveyard which has a splendid monument for henry Clay Lexington is a very large city Now I must tell you some things that happen on rout hear Every one of the boys were drunk when we came to Altoona And crossing the Alleghany Mountains we had very hard times snowing all the way and going through the tunnel we were nearly all smothered We all thought that we would never get through Cincinnati is allso a very large city and a great many people living their But the are all for the Union they treated us very kind they gave us the best dinner that we had since we are in the U.S. Service they gave us ham and butter bread and cheese Eggs and pickels apples and coffee So you can think that we eat very hardy and all through the city they cheered us and Waved the Stars and Stripes And I nearly forgot to tell you About Columbus there the citizens brought bread and coffee to the cars for us Now I must turn back again to Pittsburg there we had bread and cheese coffee and apple cakes and pickels and butter and smoked beef for Supper now I will turn to Kentucky when we came to Covington there we got on the cars for this place Every thing went on very quite untill we we came hear hear we had a few fights Now Every thing is very cheap hear twice as cheap as in newport news but we are not paid yet and dont know when we will get paid Every thing is very nice looking hear the farmers are planting Potatoes And every thing else beside this we are all well thank God give my best respects to Father and Mother Sisters and Brothers So with this I must close direct as in John's letter
I Still Remain Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy


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69. April 15, 1863
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lexington April 15th 1863
Dear Brother
            I once more endeavor to drop a few lines to you Hoping this to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present We are still in the city of Lexington Doing Provost Duty and we on guard every other day But we are the boys that can the work We have a great many Rebel Prisenors to guard We are camped in a large Hemp Factory We have very good times Every thing is quite hear No Talk of a fight and we are detached from our Brigade We are going to be kept hear for some time and maybe will go back to Cincinnati to do Provost duty their I can tell you that I like a Soldiers Life bettar every day for I am getting as heavy as a young horse Plenty of every thing we are now in a part of a country that the women are all Secesh the other day as we were going to Louisville they came to the windows and when they seen the Rebel Prisenors they unfurled the bars and stars as they thought that the Rebs had driven us from Lexington again And that they were going up to Louisville to take that the report was heer that clukes (?) was moving on to this place with a heavy force Give my Best Respects to Joseph Athey allso to father and Mother and Sisters and Brothers allso give my kind love to Cousin Malinda And let me hear from you Right away as I Received no letter since we left Newport News So with this I must close So Adieu
I Still Remain You
Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
            Lexington Ky
In care of Captain Winlack
PS
Do not forget to write again as before


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70. April 17, 1863
To Brother Samuel M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lexington, Kentucky
April 17th 1863
Dear Brother
            Once more I Endeavor to write a few lines to you Hoping this to find you all in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present. Further I Received your Kind and Wellcomed letter Dated April 8th On the 15th and was glad to hear from home I allso Received the Dollar and four Postage Stamps As you say that it is very muddy their hear the weather could not be finer the day are as warm hear as in July And I must tell you that this is the finest farming country that Ever I saw the fields are all green We are still in town doing Provost Duty Yesterday We arrested a fine young lady dressed in Soldiers cloth and commited her to jail There are Rebel prisoners coming every day and we are guarding them There is three hear that help to captured me at Kelly's Ford Last August all quite hear Only the women they kick up a fuss every now and then. As you are talking about a Union League I hear of them before there are some in Cincinnati All We require of the North is to keep down the traitor of the north And we will soon bring the Traitors of the South. I must tell you that every thing is very cheap hear Butter is selling at twenty cents a pound and Eggs at fifteen cents a dozen Bread five cents a loaf and every thing is cheap too I have nothing else to write in particular to write this time So you must excuse me for not writing more Give my best Respects to Sisters and Brothers allso to mother and give my best Respects to Mr. Schreibers and family So With this I come to a close So Adieu
Direct as before
I Still Remain your afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Write soon again as I will write every week to one at home
            D.E.R.  


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71. April 21, 1863
To sister Sarah Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lexington, Kentucky
April 21st 1863
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to your Hoping this to find you in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present. Further I received your kind letter last night and was glad to hear from you. Tell Aaron that I would like to have his likeness We are still in the same old place yet every thing is quite here This is a very fins place where we are camped Every one of them are nearly all Secesh and Copperheads all in favor of the South But we are bringing them to their Sences now We are arresting some of them Every day Tell mother that I would send my likeness to her but that it costed two and a half Dollars for one and tell her not to trouble herself about me that I was all right and cared for getting bigger every day and Stronger but I must tell you that we are on guard every other day. Give my kind love to Sisters and brothers allso to father and mother allso to Samuel Reed  them Directions are Saint Clair Schuylkill County Pen
now I must close my letter So Adieu
I still remain your
Brother now and untill death
Daniel E. Reedy

Direct
            Company E 48th Regt P.V.
            Lexington, Kentucky


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72. May 3, 1863
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
City of Lexington
May 3rd 1863
Dear Father
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping this to find you all in good health as this leaves me at present. I received your kind and welcome letter on the 1st of this month bearing date April 23 and was glad to hear that you was well The smallpox are around here too in some of the Regiments In your last letter there were four stamps There is no news hear of any importance. Last Week we were Relieved from provost Duty by Order of Gen. Burnside But the Citizens of this city did get up a petition and send it to Burnside for us to stay in town So we were ordered back to town to do provost Duty again and in the morning as we were going down we were cheered all along. We are now arresting women and all other secesh and put them to jail they are bringing in the Rebs every day and we have great times guarding them Now is the time we can repay them for what they done to us when we were taken. Please to send me a philadelphia Enquirer next week as we would like to see a paper from their we get the journal every week The boys are all in good health and spirits when we get paid again they say they will give us half of our bounty which is fifty dollars Every thing go right here Give my kind love to mother Sisters & Brothers and except an equal share yourselve
From Your Afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E, 48th Regt. P.V.
Lexington, Kentucky


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73. May 8, 1863
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
City of Lexington
May 8th 1863
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you Hoping this to find you all in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present. Thank God for it. I Received your kind and welcomed letter Dated May 3rd yesterday and was sorry to hear that you were not well But I hope to hear in your next letter that you are all well again I have not been sick since I was taken prisenor I am getting heavier every day you would not know me it you met me in my Soldier Suit I weigh one hundred and fifty four pounds Every thing here is quite no sign of any fighting here we are still doing provost duty hear The Regiment is in excellent health and spirits and all eager to meet the Enemy once again For the north is getting to be a united front and so we will try them in the near for now is the time to strike to bring this Wicked Rebellion to a close There is no new of any importance hear we are still arresting Citizens yesterday we arrested three females and send them to Louisville for trial this Evening ten of us are going out on a scout in rebel uniform to try to catch a Rebel Colonel some twenty miles from here he came home on a furlough to see his friends The small pox are still around hear in every Regiment except our they are a great many dieing around hear now since the small pox are around Please to write soon again for I am in trample (?) I will send you a memorandum of all our travels next week which I would like you to save James Greener sends his best to you all Give my best to Joseph Athey and Joal Hatter So adieu
I still Remain your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before


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74. May 27, 1863
To Sister Sarah J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Denneson Ky
May 27th 1863
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you in the same state of health as this leaves me at present I Received your kind letter on the 26th dates May 19th and was glad to hear that you were all getting well again for indeed I was sorry to hear that you had the small pox But as you wanted me to write more letters I cannot do it for I write every oppertunity I get we out in the country scouting allmost every day So every time that we catch some prisenors we bring into our camp So you see that I have no time to write every week I am in excellent health Now we are still doing provost duty in the town All the Regiments have moved out from here Except our own We have good times now Every morning the Citizens send milk for our coffee and in the country we eat altogether at the farmers houses there are still a great many refugees coming in from Tennessee. It is very warm hear now and I have not much more to say only hoping to hear from you soon again I Still Remain your Borther
Daniel E. Reedy
Hear is a rebel letter
Direct as before
give my best Respects to Joel Hatter and old Mary allso to father and Mother and Brothers and Sisters
So Adieu
Write soon again


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75. June 11, 1863
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Lexington
June 11th 1863
Dear Father
            Sir
            I once more endeavor to write these few lines to you to let you know that I am well at present allso hoping this to find you all in the same state of health. Further I Received your kind letter Dated June  and was glad to hear that you were all well again I allso Received four stamps and the Enquirer There is no news hear of any importance to-day our band reached us again We are still doing provost Duty in the city the farmers are very kind around hear If we go into a house they will not let us go untill we have Dinner Strawberries and Cheries are ripe now and plenty of them too Please to send me a little money next time you write to me We are all in excellent health and spirits Our old General is in Command here now maybe you dont know who I mean Old Swearing Sam Sturgis and Sigfried is commandind the Post They are taking a great many prisenors in this state and the conscripts will be inforced in a few days Even the people are all willing to go Let me know all the news in your next letter Give my best Respects to Mother Sisters & Brothers So with this I will close hoping to meet you all at home in peace again
From your afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy

Direct as before
Excuse my bad writing
for my finger is soar
D.E.R.


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76. June 20, 1863
To Hannah M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Poem: "Farewell Old Forty Eighth," by M.D. Wells

Farewell Old Forty Eighth
By M.D. Wells
[The following lines were inscribed to the Forty eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Vols. By Mr. Wells. A prisoner in number three. In the early part of May last, at the time the Regiment was on the point of leaving Lexington for the field. The Regiment was however again ordered to duty in the city. Upon the application of A number of citizens of the city. Publisher]
Farewell old friends of the Forty Eighth
You leave us now in Gloom
No more we'll meet you at the Grate
At morning, night or noon
            Kind Friends, Adieu
Your country calls, you must away
To meet your country's foe;
Still oft throughout the weary day
Our thoughts will follow wherever you go
            Kind Friends, Adieu
Oft will we think of the Forty-eighth
When thundering cannons roar
And heave a sigh for friends whose fate
Is sealed forever more
            Kind Friends, Adieu
Yet noble friends, go where you will,
We'll often think of thee
And of the glorious moments passed
In prison number Three
            Kind Friends, Adieu

The members of the Forty-eighth Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers who have guarded Prison number three and four, will please accept the above lines as a tribute of respect and thanks for their kind and generous treatment to us, during our confinement in said prison
            M.D. Wells
            James H. Davis
            Robert Kidd
            L.M. Weaver
            George Richardson
            James A. King
            John D. Alexander

Wrote by Daniel E. Reedy
Lexington, Kentucky
June 20th 1863


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77. July 1, 1863
To Sister Hannah M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lexington
Dear Sister
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you all in the same state of Good health as this leaves me at present I Received your kind and welcomed letter yesterday and was glad to hear from you it is very seldom that I get a letter nowadays. I guess there is a great deal of excitement in Donaldson now But now is the time to save Pennsylvania from the hands of the Enemy we have them in the right place here taking them prisenors every day and sending them to camp chase for Parole Every thing is quite in this town We are going to have a great picnic party here on the fourth of july the Citizens are going to give us a Dinner we raised a pole and a flag thirty feet long and a new Regimental flag Tell father that I got the Dollar and four Po Stamps Give my kind love to Father Mother Sisters and Brothers So with this I must close
Write Soon again
From your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
July 1st 1863


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78. July 19, 1863
To Brother John. J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lexington, July 19th 1863
Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seated myself to answer your kind which Received last night. I am well at present and I hope this may find you in the same state of health Every thing is quite hear we are still in the city doing Provost Duty and that is the reason that I did not answer your letter sooner I was away on a scout last week and only got to camp last night and we are going again to morrow we are picking up Reb Stracklers So I cannot write a long letter this time Please to let me know all the news around home and give my kind love to Father and Mother allso to Sisters and Brothers and let me know some thing about Elizabeth as I have no heard any thing from her since we are hear On the first of August there is a man to hang in this city So with this I must close
            So Adieu
From Your Afflictionated
Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before


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79. July 30, 1864
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA

Dear Brother
            With pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you hoping this to find you in good health as this leaves me at present I am sorry to say that I did not receive a letter from home since the fourth day of July I would have had wrote before now but I was waiting for a letter from you I must tell you how we are getting along here We are looking for the Rebs Every minute this is the fourth night that We are on picket duty But we are going to get Relieved to-night This morning our company captured sixteen Rebs The people are almost scared to death in the city a part of our Regement is still doing Provost duty I am still in the Scouting party and we are all through the Country and we have got splendid times now Plenty to Eat and drink and I like Soildering better every day give me all the news from home give my love to Mother & father Sisters & Brothers
So with this I must close
From your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Lexington Kentucky July 30th 1863



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80. August 10, 1863
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lexington
August 10th 1863
Brother
            Sir
            With pleasure I seated myself to answer your kind letter of the 2nd Which I received on the 7th and was glad to hear that you were all well Thank God I am well Every since we came to this city Last week we were down at Hickman's Bridge on a scout and had a bit of a bush wack with the reb's on a scouting party There is no danger of them coming to Lexington There are none within forty miles from here Every time they show themselves they catch hell in Kentucky We got 26 Dollars in June but we got none since Please to let me know in what Regt John Fox was in for I seen none that I knowed in the fight at Fredericksburg now I must tell you how we all coming on hear we all have girls And Oh Those Beautiful fields it is the nicest part of Ky Peaches Aples and pears allso Plums are ripe now and plenty too the people bring them to camp for then cents a peck and we just have better times than if we were at home we have not a sick man in our company now And I like Soldiering better every day a great many of the boys are talking about joining the regular army for five years more Please to give my kind love to Father & Mother Sisters & Brothers and tell Sister Lizzie to write to me for I wrote the last two letters to her and got no answer from her But I must bring my Scribbling to a close Give my kind Respects to Old Mary
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
to
John J. Reedy



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81. August 15, 1863
To brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Provost Marshal's Office
Lexington, Ky August 15th 1863
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure that I write these few lines to you Hoping this to find you in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present. We are now under marching orders but we are not Relieved from duty yet and so we do not know how soon we may go away from this city all the citizens want us to stay hear The Regiment is in Excellent health only a few men sick and they not dangerously. Now that John wanted to know if the man that was hung was a Union man I am sure that no one can tell for he was in jail three years and Seven months before he was hung he had a horible death but he took it very easy and only spoke a few words before he was hung. Every thing is quite here now Today we started to press Negroes again and I think we will go on a scout again before long now I tell you we have fine times when we are out scouting each man has a horse and then we travel from twenty to thirty miles a day through fine country and Peaches Apples allso pears ripe and plenty of them too and then again sometimes we come to houses where the women spit in our faces and tell us Lincolnites to clear from their Soil and curse and Damn us and then again we come to places where the girls comes running out clapping their hand and even kiss them that get off their horses and give us dinner or supper or anything we want to have now I tell you Dear Brother that we have a real Gentleman life of Soldiering every since we came to old Kentucky I never met a more civilized People before. Now they may talk about their negroes up north they are treated Why they aint one Slave in Kentucky that would go away from their masters if they were free to-day. They are dressed up in the finest Silks and satens and live a great deal better than most people in the north May be you think that I am a negro lover But that is not the case with me I dont care what they do with them most of our boys goes in for killing them all But I shall never Stay in Pennsylvania any more Kentucky shall be my home and burial grounds If this war was over to-day I would come to see you ones all again But I reckon I would not stay there long for this is the finest country I ever seen in my life before and all good Educated People in it They are a good many Secesh in it now and that what's the matter Give my kind love to Father and Mother allso to Sisters and Brother Please to let me know all the news in town
I guess I must close my letter now for the clock is striking twelve Oclock I am on guard on the Provost Marshalls Office and we have to go on patrol at one So I thought I would write to you Give my Respects to Old Mary and all Acquaintances
Direct as before
From Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E, 48th Regt. P.V.
Lexington, Ky

To A.H. Reedy
Donaldson
Schuylkill County
Penna


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82. August 20, 1863
To Sister Hannah M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lexington Aug 20th 1863
Dear Sister
            It is with pleasure I write these few lines to hoping this to find you all in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present Thank God for it. I received your kind and wellcomed letter Dated August 12th on the Seventeenth and was glad to hear from you. You stated in your letter than the weather was very warm there Now I must tell you that I never seen it as hot before for it almost roasted one one alive But we have very good water here but it is limestone water now I must tell you that we have very fine times hear one hundred and fifty of our boy's are guarding the railroad between here and Covington and the rest of us are still doing Provost duty here Please to let me know how beef and potatoes sell at home now We have plenty of every thing that we want Apples and Peaches are brought here to us into Camp allso corn by the wagon load the boys are all in excellent health Please to tell Father that I Received them eight Stamps in your letter allso tell Sarah to write to me soon Tell Aaron that I would like to see him now if he was hear I would give a nice sword that we captured last week from a Secesh to-day we had a grand [?] out for and escort for Genl Nelson our Regiment taking the lead and two companies of the 1st O.V.I. three hundred strong following with about five hundred citizens Give my love to Father and Mother Sisters & Brothers So with this I must close
I Still Remain your
Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.


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83. August 26, 1863
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
City of Lexington
Dear Brother
            It is with dissatisfaction that I write this letter to you it is now over a week ago I wrote to you and got no answer yet I am still enjoying good health and I hope this may find you all the same I am still in this city and on guard every other day but that we can stand very well and we would sooner be hear then to be marching I seen some of the boy's in the fiftienth they look very hard after their tramp to Vicksburg Some of the Regiments have only fifty men for duty the others all being sick and left behind, But we are in hopes that Charlestown will soon fall and then this wicked Rebellion will be crushed They are rumerds afloat hear that Chattanooga had fallen and that Bragg was retreating south Every thing is quite here only a few straggling Rebs coming in from the front Last night our Band gave a concert and a large lot of people were there Tonight they will give a concert at Paris Please to give me all the Particulars in town and write soon again for I am always anxious to hear from home Give my love to Father and Mother allso to Sister's and Brother's allso to Old Mary So with this I must close So Adieu
I Still Remain your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
August 26th 1863


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84. September 5, 1864
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lexington September 5th 1863
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure I write these few lines to you to let you know that I am Still enjoying good health and I hope this may find you the same. I Received sister Sarah's letter last night And was glad to hear that you were all well. Every thing is quite here this morning we sent one hundred Rebel Prisoners to Louisville for exchange and more still coming Old Burny is stirring them up in Tennessee There is no news here of any important we are enjoying ourselves like at home this morning one of the guards was taking one of Company C's Boys to camp drunk and he started to run away the guard told him to stop but he kept on running and so the guard shot him And he died this afternoon his name is Wm. Burke You wanted to know if we had any Huckelberries here the people dont know what they are not any around hear at all other kind of fruit grows here The largest Watermelons sell here for fifteen cents and Peaches for fifty cents a bushel and ever thing else is cheap Beef sell at five cents a lb Dear Brother I must now tell you who we are making out hear We are on guard every other day But that is nothing for one of us to do now. This is the greatest Place in the world for Theatres and Concerts on every night And so we have fine sport there I have not much more to say this time And have to close my letter for the Relieve guard is coming from Camp Give my kind love to Father and Mother allso to Sisters and Brother's And give my kind respects to Sarah Shoafstall and to Old Mary And to all other acquaintances And Companions
From Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regiment Penn Vol
Lexington
Kentucky

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85. September 14, 1863
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Crab Orchard
September 14th
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure I write these few lines to you to let you know our present situation We left Lexington on the 10th for Nicholdsville where we arrived at 12 M. and marched to Camp Parke where we laid untill the 12th when we started for here were crossed the Kentucky River at 9 A.M. and came to Huntsville at 1 P.M. and then we came to Camp Dick Robertson at 5 P.M. and halted for the night Just as we had our tents piched it started to hail and rain the hailstones were as large as birds eggs On the 13 we traveled twenty miles to Crab Orchard we came to Lancaster at 11 A.M. and Reached Preachersville at 3 P.M. on the 14 we Passed through the town of crab Orchard and Passed it 4 miles where we are encamped now I am in excellent health and spirits and I hope this may find you in the same state of good health we are going to the Knoxville we are to leave here to morrow morning we had great times coming along the road Cheering and hollowing at every little thing we saw And we had great times leaving Lexington the People Crying like if we were there son's & Brother's we cheered them all along the road Every thing is quite hear and we hear no news of any kind it come funny to be in the front to Pich tents after dark So with this I must close Please to let me hear from you soon
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
1st Brigade
2nd Division
9th Army Corps
via Nicholdsville Ky
September 14th and 15th 1863


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86. September 22, 1863
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Cumberland Gap
September 22nd 1863
Dear Brother
            I once again write these few lines to you to let you know where we are and how we are making out I am still enjoying good health and I hope this may find you in the same state of health. We are now at the gap going to Knoxville We left crab Orchard on the 16th and marched within 1 1/2 miles to Mt. Vernon and left Camp early again Passing Mt. Vernon at 7 A.M. next day we marched to Hazle Hatch were we were Paid next morning we left again Passing London 7 A.M. next day  we traveled again and came to Barboursville at 3 P.M. and went 3 miles Passed town and camped next morning we started off again and crossed the Cumberland River and camped on the bank this morning we started again and came to the at 5 P.M. and camped in Tennessee we are camped in such a Place where we can sit on three states at one time we have got great fun along the cheering and singing the boy's are all like wild if they come to a old mule they all start to cheer We left crab Orchard with 5 day's rations and sixty rounds of Amunition but now we only have forty rounds to carry Every thing is very scarce along the road but we have got good water all along the road Every thing is quite here no Rebel near September 23 we left cumberland gap and crossed the Powel River and came to Tazewell Tennessee nearly burned down by the Rebels Last October on the 24th we left camp at 8 A.M. and marched to the Clinch River which we had to ford The water three feet deep the boys all started to cheer when they jumped into the river with clothes all on the Doctor told us not to pull off our shoes that we would get soar feet Tonight we are again getting five day's rations to start off again on the 25th we left camp at 6 A.M. and marched to the Clinch Mountain which we crossed it was a very hard mountain to get over and then we came to the Bolton River which we had to ford it was the largest river we waded yet that is since we left Lexington On the 26th we left at 7 A.M. and marched to Morristown where we came to the rail. Road leading to Richmond and Chattanooga and then we marched to More (?) Creek the afternoon was one of the worse that we ever marched the roads was very dusty You could not see the Company ahead of you at one place we were halted and a lot of Tennessee women to the road and they would not leaves untill our drummers and fifers Played Yankey Doodle for them they are all for the Union Dear Brother I must tell you that we had a gentlemen's life in Lexington but now we have got hard times up early and late and marching from 15 to 20 miles a day over hills and mountains today you could see long moving clouds of dust for miles ahead cavelry and infantry moving toward Knoxville to-day we captured one Rebel Soldier on the 27th we left More Creek at 6 A.M. and came to New Market at 8 A.M. and then we marched to Holsten River which we crossed on a old Rail road bridge a very poor trestle work it we out up by the Rebs the time [?] made the raid into hear and then we still crossed on through the dust for 6 miles farther where we camped for the night we left and at 7 A.M. and marched to 1 O.Clock when we halted for two hours and we [?] [?] again for Knoxville here we arrived at 5 P.M. and are encamped on this side of the town we do not know when we will leave hear again but I guess we will leave again for the front in a few days the Rebels are within sixteen miles of here and are ennoying our troops somewhat but we will soon put them from there I must close my letter for this time hoping to hear you again Give my love to father and Mother  and Sisters & Brothers So Adieu
I Still Remain Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division 9th Army Corps
va Cincinnati Ohio
(I sealed this letter on the 29th
Please dont destroy this)



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87. October 15, 1863
To Brother John J. Reedy
Knoxville October 15th 1863
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you. I am still good health and I hope this may find you in the same state of good health. I received your letter of the 18th on the 12th last and was glad to hear from you On sunday October 4th we got orders to leaves Camp standing and our knapsacks behind we started from camp about 10 A.M. and marched down to the Depot where we took the cars and got started at 12 M and reached Morristown at 5 P.M. and laid there untill got Orders we then started again at 7 P.M. Bulls gap or Junction where we laid all night next morning we started at 8 A.M. and marched about 3 miles where we encamped Untill further orders The 1st Brigade 2nd Division 9th Army Corps and one Battery laid there the Rebels within four miles but no fighting our Regiment on picket where we untill the 10th when we left camp at 9 A.M. and reached Blue Springs where we were ordered to charge the enemy on top of a large hill But they evacuated the hill about ten minutes before we reached the top we were ordered to hold the hill about 5 P.M. The 1st Division of our corps attacked the Rebels and drove them their loss was 40 killed and 70 wounded and some prisoners were taken than night they retreated and next morning we followed them and came to Greenville about 1 P.M. and found no rebels there we then went to Rheatown and they had left there we then went 2 miles further where we stoped for the night that day we traveled 21 miles and only had a rest of 15 minutes they lost quite a number of men and horses we counted 87 wagons laying along the road the Cavelry still following them now I must tell you that wild goose chase turned out to a regular rout of the Rebs it was a horrible sight to see the Rebs laying along the road some had half their heads taken of others there arms and legs the woods was laying full the left there wounded in our hands at earnest's farm we got a Colonel with his arm blown off with a shell So this ended our chase on the 13th we got orders to go to Knoxville again and started at 7 A.M. and marched back 4 miles past Greenville to take the cars we stoped there all night Next morning we got orders to march to Bulls Gap about 14 miles we reached at about 2 O clock and fixed up the tents and then we got orders again to march to Morristown to take the cars by 9 A.M. next morning so we pulled down our tents and marched 5 miles further where we laid that night next morning there came the tuck of war the cry was no for a race another Brigade was going to get ahead of us to get the cars but we passed them at Russelville and Reached Morristown at 11 A.M. ad got on the cars and started for our Old Place and got to our camp at five o clock where we cheer like mad men with Soar feet this march was over one hundred and fifty miles The men and women were very glad to see us coming some would run out and start hollowing the Yankeys are coming Oh God the Yankeys and all such expressions this Expitition was led By Our old Burnsides all Soldiers friend on the Evening of the 13 we were all called into line each company by itself when the captain came and told all that wanted to vote for Curtin to step to the front when the whole company steped to the front So was the case of all the rest all for Curtin
Please to answer this letter give my love to father and mother Sisters & Brother allso to Joseph Athey so with this I must close
From your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct to me
            Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
            1st Brigade 2nd Division
            9th Army Corps
                        Knoxville
Or elsewhere stationed               Tennessee

James Greener sends his best respects to you


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88. October 30, 1863
To Brother Samuel M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Lenoire  October 30th 1863
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you To let you know our present Situation we left Knoxville on the twenty Second at 8 O Clock P.M. and marched to the depot where we took the cares and came to Concord at 11 O Clock P.M. and then we came to Lenoire at 12 O Clock At night and run to Louden bridge where we got of the cars. And laid along side of the Rail Road all night. Louden bridge was burned down by the Rebels it was twenty eight hundred feet long all the piers were build out of stone and that is all that is left of the bridge Louden is fortified Every hill is lines with Rifle pits and breastworks When we woke up the next morning it was raining very heavy and thundering the boys all wet at 8 O Clock A.M. we marched to the next hill where we laid all night in the rain the next morning we left camp and moved over into the woods where we fixed up our tents And that night at 5 O Clock P.M. Me and John Penman of our Company went to cut wood with hatcheds when my hathced flew off the handle and cut him in the right knee when he left his hatched fly and cut me in the left knee On the twenty eighth we left camp at five O Clock A.M. and marched to the River and there we Stacked arms after awhile we marched back behind a hill where we stacked arms again and then we started for the river without arms to take up the Pontoon bridge but we had to lay untill all the troops got across and then we carried the planks nearly one mile to the cars and then we laid untill dark when we marched about one mile into the woods and camped for the night. Louden was evacuated on the 28th day of October by General Burnsides A fine engine was run over Louden bridge into the river over fifty feet high which made a fine explosion On the 29th We left camp at 8 O Clock A.M. and marched back to Lenoire where we are encamped
Dear Brother now I must tell you how we fair now. Uncle Sam is getting Poor as we are only drawing half rations of bread meat full and coffee and sugar quarter rations So you can know that we fair Poor at Louden we bought some Middlings and baked cakes of it. I am still enjoying good health and in good spirits and I hope this may find you in the same state of good health. Please to let me know if you received my likeness
            I still remain Your Brother
                        Daniel E. Reedy
                        Company E. 48th Regt. P.V.
                        1st Brigade 2nd Division
                        9th Army Corps
                                    Knoxville Tennessee
(Or elsewhere stationed)  


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89. November 3, 1863
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Lenoire
November 3rd 1863
Dear Father
            It is with pleasure I write these few lines to you to let you know that I am still enjoying good health and I hope this may find you in the same state of good health I received your kind and welcomed letter Dated Oct 19th on the first of November. I was very glad to hear from home as this is the third letter I received Since I am in Tennessee from home and I wrote one in return of them at Knoxville And I allso send my Ambrotype from Knoxville But our Communication with the north is very poor just now We are on half rations this long time, the reason is we cannot get Supply from the North. I was going to send home some money but did not trust to to send it by mail. But now we have to buy some to eat and every thing is very high and scarce too. I have a notion to reenlist again for three years more they are going to give four hundred and two dollars bounty which I think is a good Change for a young man. The First Division of our Corps is putting up winter quarters but we have no orders yet So we do not know where we are going to yet to. There is no news of any importance here every thing quite only the Rebels are moving around us but they let us alone we are on picket nearly every other day. And as you speak A.G. Curtin the news of his reelection was received here with Cheers I must Close Give my love to mother Sisters and Brothers
From Your Afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
Knoxville Tennessee

or elsewhere stationed


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90. November 18, 1863
To a "Brother," unsure as to who
Knoxville Tennessee
November 18th 1863
Dear Brother
            On Saturday 14th of this month The pickets were fired into at Lenoire and we had to go to Support them at 3 O Clock at night early that morning they started to fire again when we got orders to fall back across the river so we destroyed a pontoon bridge That afternoon we started in the direction of Louden but after marching one mile we halted. Next morning we started at two O Clock the roads very muddy and reached Louden day break and lay behind A hill untill eleven O Clock when the rebel skirmisher advanced and our pickets opened on them and after a few volleys our men fell back and our Brigade started for the front and lay in the front untill five O Clock when we were ordered to fall back to Lenoire where we arrived at seven O Clock And got orders to march to Kinston cross roads where we arrived at day light and halted to make coffee after resting awhile We fell in again and marched into a field and formed a line of battle and after a while the First Division of our Corps engaged the rebs and we formed as A reserve but looking around we seen the rebels on three sides of us so we fell back to next hill when they came unto us by brigades but our Artillerary opened on them which broke them. But we had to fall back again to the next hill where we lay untill dark the rebs still advancing on us but after dark we started for Knoxville where we arrived early that morning and halted. Next morning we got orders to be ready to move in half hours notice when we fell in and marched through town and lay for the day. In the afternoon we were ordered to fall in again and marched to a large hill. The rebs and our men were skirmishing that night at ten O'Clock we fell in again and marched to the other side of town and got shovels and picks And came back and throwed up entrenchments and started to cut down the fences and houses. Next morning the rebs started to fire again and we had a skirmish all day. Next morning we were ordered to the trenches early in the morning But had no occassion to fire the skirmishers had quite a time of it all day. Next morning Skirmishing started early and lasted untill dark when the rebs started to shell us. And there we burned six or eight houses to prevent them of charging on us Saturday Twenty First. Raining very heavy all night and in the morning and only an odd shot fired But in the afternoon we had a sharp skirmish.
Daniel Emmanuel Reedy


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91. December 11, 1863
To "Brother," unsure as to who
Camp Near Rutledge
December 11th 1863
Dear Brother
            Thursday November 22nd in the morning only an occassional shot fired by the pickets and remained so all day. Next morning Skirmishing started, early and lasted all day. Late in the evening the rebs made a charge on the pickets driving them in I was on picket this night Early the next morning the Twenty First Regiment Mass Vol. Infantry and our Regiment made a charge on the rebels and drove them to there rifle pits again. Next day skirmishing again for the whole day sharp Cannonading across the river next day firing in our front all day. Friday Twenty seventh A few shots fired all day some cannonading in the evening. Next day picket firing Last night at eleven O Clock they started to shell us And drove in our pickets And charged on Fort Sanders Benjamins Battery but were repulsed with heavy loss. This morning the rebels and our boys ceased firing and met half way's and shook hands under a flag of truce untill they buried there dead And it was like as it there was peace declared. Next day nothing but picket firing. December First Skirmishing all day untill dark when they ceased firing. Next day brisk skirmishing on our left The news of Braggs retreat was received with vocivious cheering. Next day All quite in the morning Picket firing in the afternoon Next day picket firing in the morning and cannonading in the evening. Saturday 5th this morning about two O.Clock the rebels started to draw in their pickets and at daylight we found their pits empty So we went out and took a lot of prisenars. Next day all quite and we were paid Next day We left Knoxville at nine O.Clock in the direction of Morristown and marched twelve miles and halted for the night. Thursday 8th Left camp at twelve O.Clock and marched eight miles and halted for the night Next morning we left camp at eight O.Clock and marched within one mile of Rutledge where we lay four days. Tuesday 15th Left camp near Rutledge at seven O.Clock P.M. and took up our line of march toward Knoxville and marched untill one O.Clock at night when we halted for the night. Next day Left camp at ten O.Clock A.M. and marched about five miles when we formed a line of battle along a rail fence where we laid all night Thursday 17th Laid in line of battle all day Light Skirmishing in our front where we laid all next day. Saturday 19th Moved camp into the woods where we lay now.
Daniel Emmanuel Reedy

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92. December 18, 1863
To Brother John Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp in east Tennessee
December 18th 1863
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure I write these few lines to you to let you know of our present situation. I am still enjoying good health And I was glad to hear from you as I did not Receive your letter Dated Nov. 18th untill Dec. 15th. Lying in front of the enemy for over one month and being entirely Surrounded at Knoxville skirmishing all time and at Chambell's Station we had quite a fight fighting all day and retreating all night untill we reached Knoxville where we entrenched ourselves and doing picket duty on one day and of next and very little to eat living on bran and corn meal and half rations at that and no coffee or rice nothing but one meal a day and what little we forraged now I must not make my letter to long for the mail is going of a 7 O Clock and we are going to move again in the morning I will give you all particulars in my next letter if I get a get a show to write again for I only had this half sheet and had to borrow an envelope for we have nothing along with us only our blankets. And as you wanted to know if I would be free as soon as the Regt I will. I Receave all of my money and spent it nearly all I have forty seven Dollars in my pocket but I cannot sent any home now for we have no way to sent it now I must bring this to a close hoping to hear from you soon The Regiment lost 21 men since this started only one out of our company he is a prisenor Please to write often as we cannot [?]
From Your Brother Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before

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93. December 21, 1863
To sister Sarah Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Plains X Roads Tenn
December 21st 1863
Dear Sister
            It is with pleasure I seated myself to write these few lines to you to let you know that I am still among the living and enjoying good health and hoping this to find you in the same state of health I Received your kind letters One Dated Nov 4th and the other Dec 1st and was glad to hear from you Dear Sisters Now I must tell you how I made out since Longstreet is in Tennessee In the Skirmish at Loudon we lay as a reserve Back at the battle of Cambell Station we had quite a time of it the Rebs driving us and Towards the last they started to shell us Killing one and 2 wounded and one prisoner And we would march all night and fight in day untill we reached Knoxville where we worked all the time we were not on picket And very little to eat I was on guard for seven day one after another without being relieved And picket firing all the time killing a good many of our boys
There was a woman living between the two picket lines Are you the Union no you are not Yes you are She used to say we burned a large part of the town We are now camped about 15 miles from Knoxville Doing Picket Duty So I must close my letter for the mail is starting give my love to Father & Mother, Sister & Brothers
So Adieu
I Still Remain Your Brother
D.E. Reedy
Direct as before

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94. December 24, 1863
To brother Samuel Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp Misery Tennessee
December 24th 1863
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure I write these few lines to you Hoping this to find you in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present. Further I received your kind letter and was glad to hear that you were all well I allso received Fathers five Postage Stamp We have fine days but cold nights in Dixie The ice was strong enough Yesterday for us to slide on. but the days are warm the Rebels are still in sight of us but they are quite. Please to keep all papers I send home you will find the details of our last Campaign so that you can see how and where we were give my love to Father & Mother Sisters and Brothers So with this I close
From Your afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Direct as before
James Greener send his kind respects to Sister Sarah


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1864


95. March 16, 1864
To Brother Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Harrisburg March 16th 1864
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure that I drop these few lines to you to let you know that we are now camped at Camp Curtin and we expect to remain here for thirty day's of nothing happens. We had quite a good time of it untill we got off from Pottsville there was a very large crowd gathered at the depot to see us of But I had nothing more to write for this time But answer right away I received six of your old letters
I Still Remain Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt P.V.
Harrisburg

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96. March 21, 1864
To Brother Samuel M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Annapolis Maryland
March 21st 1864
Dear Brother
            Sir
            It is with pleasure I write these few lines to you to let you know our present situation.
            We left Harrisburg for the city of Philadelphia where we arrived that night at seven O.Clock and changed cars for Baltimore and got to Havre de Grace at day-light where we were ferried across the river and then we ran to Baltimore and got there at nine O.Clock and marched to the depot but could not get the cars so we had to march back through the city to the wharf where we took a steam boat for Annapolis where we arrived that night at duck and marched to the Barracks where we lay all night and next morning we moved to camp about one mile and half from the capitol of Maryland.
            We had very fine times along the road breaking windows and stealing every thing we could get a hold of especially whiskey But now we are in a place where it is played out.
            I am still enjoying good health and I hope this may find you all in the same state of health. I am at present chief cook for our company I have three cooks under me and so I have fine times nothing to do only to draw rations for the Company Let me know all the news around town. Give my best Respects to Old Mary and Joseph Athey allso my kind love to Father and Mother also to Sisters and Brothers.
            So with this I will bring this to a close.
            Please answer soon.
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt
P.V.
Annapolis, Maryland


* * * * * * * * * *


97. March 27, 1864
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
In camp near Annapolis
March 27th 1864
Dear Brother
            As I have found a few spare moments to write a few lines I thought that I would write to you I am still enjoying good health and I hope this may find you in the same state of health. Now I must tell you that some of the boy's in the Regiment has got the Small Pox and others the Valley A Laid, there was only one died yet but A good many are sick and are sent to the hospital by ambulances full every day. Thank God I am well yet. And all my bed fellows too. There is no news of any importance here. Tell Mother to send me a Bottle of Horse Raddish and twenty-five sheets of Writing paper and twenty-five envelopes A box of Indian [?] vegetible pills and that dime novel No. 5 I left at home tell her to send it by express and to sent it right away. We are expecting to get paid every day and are told that we will get sixty-three Dollars this pay and if we do I will send  Fifty Dollars home by express Give my kind love to father & mother, Sisters & Brothers
I Still Remain Your Affectionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.V.
Annapolis, Maryland
Answer right away I did not Receive a letter from home yet.
                        D.E. Reedy


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98. March 30, 1864
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, Pa
Camp near Annapolis
March 30th 1864
Dear Father
            It is with pleasure that I write these few lines to you to let you know that I am still enjoying good health and I hope this may find you in the same state of health. Father I have no news of any importance to write this time so you must excuse a short letter.
            I seen Jerry Willower and he says that he send no money to no one in Donaldson nor gave any to no one except to those that he owed And as you mentioned no named we could not make out who he was but he send no money to any one give my kind Regards to mother Sisters and Brothers Let me know all the news in town you must excuse this short letter for I have no time to write any more this time But I answered your letter as soon as I got it.
I Still Remain Your
Afflictionated Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.
Annapolis, Maryland

Answer Soon

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99. April 11, 1864
To Sister Hannah M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA 
In Camp near Annapolis
April 11th 1864
Dear Sister
            It is with pleasure that I drop these few lines to you hoping this to find you in the same state of good health as this leaves me at present. I received your kind letter this forenoon and the Express box in the afternoon and every thing all right except the bottle of horse raddish was broke We are still at the same place and every thing goes pleasant and we have not got our new guns yet but expect to get every day General Burnsides paid us a visit on saturday and he made a bold appearance but we do when we going away from hear The small pox are all quite again but I must close my letter for the pots are boiling over. give my kind love to father and mother Sisters & brothers Answer soon again
From Your Afflictionated Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt P.V.V.
Annapolis, Maryland


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100. April 18, 1864
To A "Brother"
April 18, 1864
Dear Brother
            I send you this song to learn so that you can sing it untill I come home again.
I Still Remain Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48 Regt. P.V.V.
Ninth Army Corps
Annapolis, Maryland
Red White and Red
1st
On the banks of the Potomac theres
and army so grand Whose object
is to Subjugate Dixies fair land.
They say that we split this great
Union in two. And altered the
flag of the Red. White & Blue
            Chorus (Repeated)
Hurrah, Hurrah we are a nation they
dred. Three cheers for John Morgan
and the red. white. and red
2nd
A nice little fight on the Eighth of
last June Magruder of Bethel whipped
out Pickanne. It commenced in
the morning and lasted till two
When Dixie waved proudly over
The red white and blue
            Chorus
3rd Verse
Our flag it is simple and by it we'll
Stand It floats from the Potomac
to the great Rio Grand It floats
over a people so gallant and true
and never will be subjects of the
Red white and blue
            Chorus
4th Verse
The dearest land upon this earth
Is dixie dear dixie the land of birth
I love her I adore her Our noble Confed.
And I'll die in defense of the red
white and red
            Chorus
5th Verse
If you want to make Greely and
Yankeedom Snear Just mention the
Mason and Slidell affair when first
they caught them they made a great
to do But they curse England and
the Red white and red
            Chorus
6th Verse
One the twenty-first day of last
June the Yankees a trip to Richmond
did try. They had not gone far before
back they all flew. With there darned
Union colars shot right spang in too
            Chorus
7th Verse
One the banks of Stone River the
Yankees we met. And gave them
such a whipping they will never forget.
At the beginning of the war how little
they knew. How the Rebels would
fight against the Red White
and blue
            Chorus
8th Verse
Their is a gallant Soldier from
Kentucky her came. He is our
commander John Morgan's his
name. If you want to make
Yankees quail with fear
Just tell them John Morgan
has got in their rear
            Chorus (Repeated)
Hurra, Hurrah We are a nation they dread
Three cheers for John Morgan and
the Southern Confeds.

            This is a Rebel song


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101. April 19, 1864
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, Pa
Annapolis Maryland
April 19th 1863
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure that I write these few lines to you to let you know that I am still enjoying good health and in good spirits and I hope this may find you all in the same state of health. We are still laying at the same old place Yesterday we got the Springfield Rifle a very fine gun a great deal nicer than those we had before and So the boys are drilling four times a day. I am still at Cooking and I guess I will stay at it for a long time yet As there is no danger of getting into a fight as long as I stay at Cooking. But I have not got any thing more to say for this time give my kind love to all my Sisters & Brothers also to Father & Mother
            I am looking anxiously for a letter every day but do not get any.
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Co. E 48 Regt. P.V.V.
Ninth Army Corps
Annapolis
Maryland

* * * * * * * * * *


102. April 30, 1864
To Brother Samuel M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Bristow
April 30th 1864
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure that I drop these few lines to you to let you know our present situation. We left Annapolis on the twenty third and marched fourteen miles where we camped for the night Next morning we got up at four O clock and marched to Lanciersville where we camped next morning we left camp at six O.Clock A.M. and came to Bladensburg where forded the river twice and then we arrived at Washington at one O.Clock P.M. and crossed the Potomac into Virginia and marched within two miles of Alexandria where we encamped all next day. but early on the morning the twenty eighth the drums rolled to fall in again and marched to fairfax courthouse where we lay all night next morning we started again and came to centerville and from there we marched over the plains of Manassas and marched to this place and yesterday morn we got ready to start at four O.Clock but the order was countermanded and we went into camp and expect to lay hear for a few weeks it is a very fine place only a few rebels around to keep us from running around. As we passed over the plains of Manassas our Lieutenant picked up a hand or rather the bones of it and a great many things else was found and on the battle field of Centerville we found all kinds of relicks We are at present camped on the ground where we ran the race after the fight of Bull Run and here we flanked the rebs and got ahead of them but I am still well and enjoying good health and in good spirits give my love to father and Mother allso to Sisters and Brothers So I must close my Scribbling
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Co. E 48th Regt P.V.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
Washington D.C.


* * * * * * * * * *

103. May 2, 1864
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Camp near Bristoe Station
May 2nd 1864
Dear Brother
            It is with great Satisfaction that I seat myself to answer your kind letter which I received to-day and was glad to hear from you But the bottle spoiled most of the paper and envelope's and none of it could be used as it was to full of glass I guess you have heard before this letter reaches you that we moved from Annapolis as I wrote to Brother as soon as I got a chance to write and gave him all the particulars There are still some of Mosby's Geurillas lurking around, this place annoying the picket line at night but that is nothing in the time of roar (?) The troops are pouring in from all parts of the United States. The twentieth corps is just now passing through here from Tennessee under Hooker and there a great many negroes troop coming here too there will soon hell to play around here we are ready to march at any moment to strike the last blow to this eternal Rebellion Our boys have just returned from hunting dandalion so we are going to have a great supper I am now tenting with four boys from Mount Carmel
            I am still enjoying good health and I pray that this may find you all in the same state of health There is nothing more of any importance to relate Please to send me a few Postage Stamps and a few writing pens as we can get here of that kind
            Give my love to Father and Mother allso to Sisters and Brothers allso to Old Mary and her [?]
            Please to write soon for I will write every oppertunity I get
I Still Remain Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.V.
First Brigade Second Division
Ninth Army Corps
Washington D.C.
Do no forget to write soon I am always glad to get a letter from home
Daniel E. Reedy Captain William Winlack


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104. May 16, 1864
To Father B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
In front on the Battle Field of Nie
May 18th 1864
Dear Father
            It is with pleasure I drop these few lines to you to let you know that I am still among the living and in good health and I hope this may find you all in the same state of health. We had a heavy fight on the sixth allso one on the twelfth and are still laying in the front and the bullets whistling over my head as I write this I must bring this to a close for the mail is going to leave in a few minutes I will give you all the particulars in my next letter we lost one hundred and twenty our the Regt in killed and wounded
            Give my love to mother allso to Brothers and Sisters
From your Son
Daniel E. Reedy
Company E 48th Regt. P.V.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
Washington, D.C.



* * * * * * * * * *

105. May 18, 1864
To Brother Samuel M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
In front May 18th 1864
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure that I write these few lines to you to let you know our present situation.
            We left Bristoe Station Va on the fourth day of May 1864 and marched to Bealton Station where we encamped for the night.
            On the fifth we were routed early in the morning and marched to Rappahannock Station where we crossed the Rappahannock River on a pontoon bridge and marched about two miles where we lay for the night. Heavy firing on our left untill late in the evening.
            May 6th 1864
            We were routed at three O.clock A.M. and marched at four O.clock A.M. and marched to the left and then we marched up into the woods. Heavy firing going on all this time where all the Veterans in the Regiment were sent out as skirmishers and the rebs fired into us before we knew we were but we soon stoped that soon and lay in the woods until two O.clock P.M. when we got relieved by Regiment of the first Division and we were sent to the left where the remainder of the Regiment was engaged at the time where one of our boys was killed after firing his first load and we got one wounded The Rebs getting the worse all this time and when it was nearly dark we were marched to the right and were sent on picket for the night. May 7th 1864 We were sent out as skirmishers again and got drawn in at three O.clock P.M. and marched two miles to the rear. The rebs skeddaling all day. where we lay untill dark and then we started and marched all night and only got two miles all night. May 8th 1864 we got started early and marched to the Chancellorsville battle ground where we laid all night. May 9th 1864 We laid in camp Untill four O.Clock P.M. when we started of in the direction of Fredericksburg but after marching three miles we turned off towards Spottsylvania Court house And marched untill ten O.Clock P.M. and then laid down for the night. May 10th 1864 We laid in camp again untill four O.Clock P.M. when we were started of on A double quick and crossed a creek and were marched to the front they shelling us all this time but at last we got behind our Rifle pits where we three off our Knapsacks and were advanced through the woods and after working our way through the woods for one mile where we were ordered to lay down for the night. May 11th We started to throw up entrenchments early in the morning and when we had them nearly finished we were ordered to the rear and after marching to the rear and cooking coffee we were again ordered to the front and we marched to the top of a large hill which was strongly fortified, here we lay all night. One of our boys shot his finger off. May 12th 1864
We were routed early in the morning and marched a short piece and then we advanced in line of battle through the woods and got engaged repulsing the Rebs in fine stile Killing and wounding most of a Brigade and after this lay still only firing a few shots untill the afternoon when we were ordered to charge On a rebel Battery But had to run back then we formed a line in the woods again and marched to our entrenchments again where we lay all night fortifying ourselves all night Since then nothing of any importance has taken place only a few shots fired on both sides I am still well and in the best of spirits and I pray to God that this may find you in the same state of health give my love to Father and mother sisters and Brothers
From Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Co. E 48th Regt P.V.V.
1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
Washington D.C.


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106. May 27, 1864
To Brother John J. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
In front on the South Anna River
May 27th 1864
Dear Brother
            It is with pleasure that I write these few lines to you to let you know that I am still in good health and I hope this may find you in the same state of health I just Received yours and S. Reeds letter from Knoxville I will now give you the particulars Early on the morning of the Eighteenth of May the second corps made a charge also a part of our corps and carried the first line of pits but had to fall back the grape and canister pouring into them thick but they tried them again and got the pits but were repulsed again So we fell back to our old pits again at dark we started to throw up a short piece of Entrenchments to protect our flank and then lay down to sleep at quarter past eleven.
            On the Nineteenth we were routed at twelve O.clock last night we marched at half past twelve and marched untill three O.clock when we lay down for the night Started again at nine O.Clock A.M. and marched about one mile when we formed a line of battle and then we marched to the woods and stacked arms and it rained a little when we pitched tents the right wing was send out on picket Heavey cannonading and Musketry on our Right
            20th
            When I woke this morning the sun was up and laid in camp untill two O.Clock P.M. when the left wing was sent out to relieve the right wing off picket
            21st
            Lay in our old picket line untill half past ten O.Clock A.M. when we were ordered away to the right on picket again and we can see the Rebels walking around in all corners we are near the River Po we were relieved on picket at four O clock P.M. by the 51st N.Y. V.V. and went back to our old camp where we got three day's ration and then we started after our brigade and traveled all night.
            Sunday 22nd 1864
            We caught our Regiment at four O.Clock A.M. and lay for a while when we started again and crossed the Po river at Snells bridge and marched a short piece when we stoped to cook coffee and then we crossed the Railroad from Fredericksburg to Richmond at ten O.Clock A.M. and marched about three miles when we halted again and it rained very hard for ten minutes when it cleared of again and we kept on marching untill we came to New Bethel church when we went about half a mile further and camped for the night.
            23rd
            Rose at five O.Clock A.M. and got started at eight O.Clock A.M. and crossed the ta and mat River and took coffee and then we marched very hard untill ten O.Clock P.M. very heavy cannonading in our front we lay down for the night.
            24th
            Got up early and lay untill one O.Clock P.M. and marched to the South Anna River where we crossed under a heavy fire and marched to the top of the hill and lay down for the night but had to throw up entrenchments.
            25th
            Got up early and started to throw up Rifle pits further ahead very little firing this morning rain in the afternoon at five O.Clock P.M. we were relieved and marched to the right where we lay all night.
            26th
            This morning at three O.Clock A.M. the pickets started to fire and we were routed but lay down again today one was killed and two wounded in our Regiment but I have no more for this time. Now I hope you will copy this off with ink so it will not get rubbed off I would like you to take good care of them I will send all the details home so if you please copy it off with ink Please to send me a few good songs in your next letter I allso got a letter from you with Aarons and Samuels [?] Directed to Knoxville. Give my love to father and mother allso to Sisters and Brothers and do not forget to write soon
I Still Remain Your Brother
Daniel E. Reedy
Co. E 48th Regt. P.V.V.

1st Brigade 2nd Division
9th Army Corps
Washington D.C.
We have pretty tough times now but are giving the Rebs hell.
                        D. E. Reedy
                        Co. E 48th Regt. P.V.V.
                        1st Brigade

This lock of hair is from a Rebel woman that was killed at the battle of Ny River
                                    D.E. Reedy

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107. June 3, 1864 Letter From A.C. McClelland of the U.S. Christian Commission
To Mr. Aaron H. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
In Field Hospital of
2nd Division 9th Army Corps
June 3rd 1864
Mr. Aaron H. Reedy
            Dear Sir
                        I sit in the Hospital tent beside your brother Daniel. He is badly wounded. He says there is no hope of saving his right arm & right leg, wounded also in the breast & slightly on his left thigh.
                        Says to tell you that he is "in good spirits." What the result may be however I am of Course unable to say. he is badly wounded but does not seem badly exhausted. His wounds were rec'd in the battle of this morning, but I do not know by what name the battle if called. Yours.
                                                                        AC McClelland_Delegate of
                                                                                    The U.S. Christian Commission


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108. June 7, 1864 Letter From John Hood of the U.S. Christian Commission
To Mr. B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA  
White House Landing
Mr. B.E. Reedy
            Dear Sir--
                        I am sorry to inform you that your son, Daniel E. Reedy, was severely wounded four days ago. He received seven wounds. One arm was broken, and one leg had to be amputated. He endures it patiently, however, and is doing very well. When I was at his tent a short time ago the surgeon was dressing his wounds. We are giving him, and all the wounded, every attention that we can. I suppose he will be removed to his own state as soon as possible. He is deformed for life, but there is one consolation, that it is only for this short life. I have written this at his request.
Respectfully
John Hood
of the Chris. Com.

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109. June 19, 1864 From Charles Schnerr
To Hannah M. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Near Petersburg Camp 48 P.V.V.
June 19 1864
Maddam
            I opened your letter to your brother to see where to send it to, as he (your brother) is wounded and sent north to some hospital. He was wounded on June 3/64 at Shady Grove. I am Respect. Yours
                                                                                                            Chas. W. Schnerr
                                                                                                            Lieut. Co. E 48 P.V.V.
He was doing well a latest account he has a strong constitution and buyant in spirit which will keep him up.
                                                                                                            C.W. Schnerr


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110. July 18, 1864 Letter From Mr. W.H. Bayne of the U.S. Christian Commission
To B.E. Reedy/Donaldson, PA
Washington, July 18, 1864
Mr. Reedy
            I am unable to find your son in Washington. Hoping that ere this, you have heard from him.
                        I am
                                    Most Respectfully Yours
                                                W.H. Bayne


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111. October 24, 1864 Letter From S.A. Tobias
To Mr. B.E. Reedy
Fort Wench near Poplar Grove Church
Oct 24th 1864
Mr. B.E. Reedy
            I received your letter on Sunday evening and went over too Emmanuel's Regiment and seen his officers and asked them about him and all the Satisfaction I could get about him was that he got wounded at Shadey Grove on the 3rd day of June he had 10 Bullet holes in his Body he was then taken too the Hospital and had his Right leg amputated and the Sergeant said he thought that he could save his Right arm if he would Live and from the Hospital he was sent too washington and there was a man in the Boat that seen him he said that he died on the Boat going from Shady Grove too washington that is all I can find out about him, none of the company knows more about him there Regiment lays Right Beside us
            I think the army of the Potomac is all Right on old Abraham we expect a heavy fight this week we want the Danville Road we are about 2 miles from it now there are about 25 too 30 Jonnies comming in our Lines Every day they say that the Rebs are most Played out all they are waiting is for Little Mac for President I must close
Give my Respect to the Boys
Yours Respectfully


S.A. Tobias 

2 comments:

CER Sutton said...

Greetings, Through reading briefly through these letters I have been able to ascertain that this man, Daniel Emmanuel Reedy was a second cousin 5x removed of my husband, Michael Glenn Sutton, son of Janice Reedy Sutton. What a treasure! I am can't contain my excitement, thank you sorry much for sharing them! Cindy Sutton

CER Sutton said...

Greetings, Through reading briefly through these letters I have been able to ascertain that this man, Daniel Emmanuel Reedy was a second cousin 5x removed of my husband, Michael Glenn Sutton, son of Janice Reedy Sutton. What a treasure! I am can't contain my excitement, thank you sorry much for sharing them! Cindy Sutton