Sunday, November 4, 2018

Is This A New Face of the Forty-Eighth?

Is this the image of a 48th Pennsylvania soldier?



I don't know how many times I've said it or heard it said over the years in reference to Civil War soldier photographs and particularly CDVs: "If only they would have signed their names," or "If only someone would have written down their names. . ." 

This is the common lament for most who collect Civil War images, and especially for those who collect images of soldiers from just one single regiment, such as the 48th Pennsylvania. But the fact is that for far too many Civil War soldier CDVs, there is no identification, no name...nothing to tell us, really, who they were, what they did, or what became of them during the war or after, if, indeed, there was an after for them. Instead, we have just an image, typically of a young man in a blue uniform, with a look of youthful pride or determination upon their face and more often than not, it seems, an officer. Yet even without a name (and who today writes the names of friends, family, or even oneself on the back of their photographs?), there are sometimes clues we can follow in an unidentified soldier's photograph. What is the photographer's backmark, for example; where was the photograph taken? What kind of uniform is the soldier wearing? Is there anything on that uniform, such as a corps badge or hat brass, to help better narrow down the search? Sometimes, and especially for those who collect from a single regiment or at least for me who has spent twenty+ years searching for 48th PA images, the question is: does he have the look of a 48th Pennsylvania soldier. Not an exact science or question, to be sure. .  .but in many cases, these are the only clues we get.


Have a look at this Civil War soldier CDV, both front and back. . .


Unidentified Soldier
Mortimer/Pottsville, PA
[Hoptak Collection]




What are your thoughts at first glance?  Is it the youth of this soldier? His rather short stature, perhaps? Maybe his uniform first grabbed your attention; maybe that it appears his uniform is way too big! especially his trousers. The photographer's backmark? That there are letters and numerals on the top of the kepi he is holding? These were the things that immediately caught my attention, along with the thought, at least to me after more than two decades collecting, that this soldier has the look of a the 48th, strange as it sounds. 

But was this soldier actually in the 48th? The 48th Pennsylvania was recruited almost entirely from Schuylkill County and Pottsville, the county seat and largest city, was home to a number of photographers during the Civil War, most notably A.M. Allen and Mortimer. This image, of course, has the Mortimer backmark, as does this image of Major Joseph Gilmour of the 48th. . .


Major Joseph Gilmour, 48th PA 
[Hoptak Collection]



As you can see, same carpet, same chair...Were these two images also taken during the same time? The Gilmour image was taken in February-March 1864; was the photograph of the unidentified soldier taken during this time as well, when the regiment was home on furlough and recruiting new members? Was this young man one of those new recruits who joined the regiment in the winter of 1864? Note the absence of veterans' stripes on his uniform and, again, his youthful appearance. . . 

Certainly, though, the 48th Pennsylvania was not the only unit to be recruited from Schuylkill County and Pottsville...not by a long shot. There was the 96th PA, for instance; several companies of the 50th PA, several of the 129th PA, and several from the 7th PA Cavalry, in addition to scores of other regiments who drew recruits from Schuylkill County. And, well, during the labor disturbances in '62-'63 and into '64 there were New York and New Jersey volunteer soldiers brought in to the county to help protect against draft resistance and violence and to help ensure the mines kept pumping out the anthracite to fuel the war effort. Many of these New Yorkers and New Jersyians no doubt went to Allen's or Mortimer's studios to have their 'likeness' taken. 

But what about that hat brass?

It's really, really difficult to see...partially hidden and upside down.


Trying to make sense of those letters and numbers, I scanned the image into my computer at a high resolution, magnified it, clarified it, and turned it right side up. . .





Is any of this now any clearer?

To me, while I cannot make out the top letter, which would have denoted what company this soldier belonged to (A, B,C,D,E,F,G,H,I,K---and somehow I 'see' an E there), it does appear to me that the middle two numbers are, indeed, a "48" and the bottom letters "PV" for Pennsylvania Volunteers.

Does anyone else see this as well? 

Take a step back and look at it from a distance?


Again, it does appear to me that this young man was a soldier in the 48th Pennsylvania.

Or am I just 'seeing' 48 PV because I want to see it?  Are the letters and numbers simply too blurry to tell for sure. . .


Your thoughts, insights, etc, are appreciated! 



Friday, August 24, 2018

Help Me Identify This Unidentified Company G, 48th PA, Sergeant

Several months ago, I happened upon several images of 48th PA soldiers, including this tintype of an unidentified sergeant in Company G, 48th Pennsylvania Infantry. The image was taken in either late May or early June 1862 when the soldiers of Company G sat to have their images taken in a New Bern, NC, photographer's studio. The members of the company then presented their tintype photographs as a gift and measure of respect to Captain Philip Nagle who had resigned due to poor health. 

I wrote at length about this in a post in May of this year. 


Unidentified Sergeant, Company G, 48th PA 



The soldier in this image is clearly a sergeant--and having examined the roster of Company G, it would appear that in May/June 1862, there may have been as many as six sergeants within the ranks of the company.  Those six were: Henry Clay Jackson, Richard M. Jones, Robert Smith, Theodore Patterson, Reuben Reeser, and George Farne



Of these six, however, I think we can immediately eliminate Jackson, Jones, Patterson, and perhaps Farne, as I have identified images of these soldiers, which are seen below. .  .


Henry C. Jackson
(Courtesy of Ronn Palm and the Museum of Civil War Images)
George Farne
(From Gould, The Story of the Forty Eighth


Richard M. Jones
(From Bosbyshell, The Forty Eighth in the War

Theodore Patterson
(Unknown)

Eliminating these four from contention, then--and I am not totally convinced Farne should be eliminated since I see a little resemblance--leaves us with only two other possibilities: Robert Smith and Reuben Reeser. 

Here are the physical descriptions of these two men: 

Reuben Reeser: Age at enlistment: 43; 5'11" tall; Light Complexion; Blue Eyes; Dark Hair. 
Robert Smith: Age at enlistment: 23; 5'7" tall; Florid Complexion; Blue Eyes; Dark Hair. 


From the physical description of Reeser and Smith, it would seem that the man in the photograph can be identified as Robert Smith, since he appears closer in age to 23 than to 43. 



But what do you think?  Is this man Sergeant Robert Smith, Company G, 48th PA?  




Or could it be George Farne. . .again, to me at least, there does appear to be a resemblance. 





Sunday, June 17, 2018

"Wasn't That A Splendid Charge?:" 154 Years Ago, The 48th's "Most Brilliant Engagement" Came At A Heavy Price: Petersburg, Virginia, June 17, 1864.

Edwin Forbes Sketch of the 9th Corps's Attack at Petersburg, June 17, 1864



Sometime around 3:00 a.m. on the morning of June 17, in almost total darkness, Lt. Col. Henry Pleasants, commanding the 48th Pennsylvania Infantry, made his way quietly along the prone soldiers of his regiment, informing each of the regiment's company commanders that they would soon be launching an attack. Over the past six weeks, the 48th had suffered appalling casualties as it fought its way across northern Virginia, seeing heavy action at the Wilderness, Spotsylvania, the North Anna, and most recently at Cold Harbor. The regiment had crossed the Rapidan on May 4 and the James just a few days earlier. Now, the city of Petersburg lay just ahead, defended by a series of rebel batteries and a labyrinthine maze of earthworks and entrenchments. The 48th would soon be attacking a section of those imposing fortifications.  Stirred awake from a restless night's slumbers, the soldiers readied themselves for the charge. As quietly as possible, though no doubt with their hearts racing during that early morning stillness, they removed all caps from their guns, secured their tin cups to prevent rattling, and fixed bayonets. They soon moved forward, quietly, out of their entrenchments and crossed a small creek just to the front. "After getting the whole regiment over," remembered Sergeant Robert Reid of Company G, "we silently formed line; then, in utter darkness, moved to the right about one hundred yards, when, in a whisper, the command forward was given," and, as regimental historian Oliver Bosbyshell later wrote, "the savage rush began."


The soldiers of the 48th swept across the open ground between the opposing lines; it was still dark and the only noise was that of hundreds of feet tramping down upon the dew-covered grass and dirt. Soon after the charge began, however, off to the right of the 48th's advancing line of battle, musket fire rang out, which drew an immediate response from the Confederate line. The darkness was suddenly illuminated with the flash of the Confederate rifles. Still, the soldiers of the 48th rushed on. "Directly into this fiery ribbon, belching its leaden hail through the ranks of the charging line, swept the Forty-Eighth," wrote Bosbyshell. Reid remembered that "We went at them squarely, right into their firing line. Not one of our regiment returned a shot until we reached their works, when there was a short, sharp contest, and the line was ours. I still remember how my heart beat when starting on the charge, but it was forgotten in the glorious rush of the fight."


Within just a matter of minutes, the 48th rushed up and over a section of the Confederate entrenchments, catching many of the still sleepy gray-clad soldiers unawares. Hundreds of them were very quickly captured. Amid the confusion, Irish-born Sergeant Patrick Monaghan of Company F noticed a few Confederate soldiers attempting to flee. He ran amongst them and demanded their surrender. Their hands went up and it was soon noted that one of these Confederate soldiers was attempting to retreat with the flag of the 7th New York Heavy Artillery, which had been captured the day before. Now the flag was back in Union hands; Monaghan of the 48th having re-captured it and later returned to the New York regiment. For this action, Monaghan would received a Medal of Honor.

Robert Reid of the 48th would also receive a Medal of Honor for his actions during this pre-dawn attack on June 17, 1864. Sweeping forward and rushing up and over the Confederate lines, Reid wrestled away the flag of the 44th Tennessee from its regimental color bearer, capturing those colors.

Wrote Bobsyshell: "How the heart beat, and the pulse throbbed during that onslaught! If fear or dread marked the supreme moment of the attack, it was banished completely in the glorious rush of the fight! What a harvest of prisoners--they were captured by the score, disarmed, and sent to the rear."


Robert Reid
Sergeant Patrick Monaghan



























Yet as the skies continued to lighten another Confederate redan about 100 yards further south became visible. Confederate cannons posted there soon erupted into the flank and front of the 48th. Acting fast, Pleasants organized his men for yet another attack and "like a savage torrent" the 48th charged forward. "[T]he regiment fairly tore over those hundred yards and swept through the fort irresistibly. The enemy ran in great disorder by squads and singly to their left and rear." Two Confederate Napoleon cannons fell into the hands of the 48th which were safely hauled, by hand, to the rear.

Two cannons, two flags and two Medals of Honor, hundreds of prisoners and a good section of the Confederate line; it was a glorious victory for the 48th and for the Ninth Army Corps. All along Burnside's front, the morning attack had achieved much success. Even George Meade, commanding the Army of the Potomac, would recognize the success of the Ninth Corps in a note to Burnside, sent on that June 17: "It affords me great satisfaction to congratulate you and your gallant corps on the assault this morning, knowing the wearied condition of your men from the night march over twenty-two miles, and the continual movement this last night; their persistence and success is highly creditable." Coming from Meade to Burnside these words were high praise, indeed.

For the actions of the 48th, Oliver Bosbyshell would later write that the attack on June 17, 1864, at Petersburg, "was probably, in all its results, the most brilliant engagement for the Forty-Eighth of any in which it participated. Praise is due to every officer, from Colonel Pleasants down, and to every many who was in this grand assault, for the splendid record the work here accomplished. .  . ."

Throughout the rest of the day on June 17 the Confederates made several attempts to regain their captured works, but each were turned back. A sometimes lively skirmish fire was kept up throughout the day. The next day, Burnside determined to strike once more, this time with his 1st and 3rd Division leading the way while the 2nd Division--which included the 48th--would advance behind in support. The fighting renewed once more in intensity on June 18 as the soldiers of the Army of the Potomac attempted to drive the Confederates from yet another line of earthworks and trenches very close to the city of Petersburg. Along the Ninth Corps front and though designated as a reserve, the soldiers of the 48th were once more brought to the front. They charged down a ravine and across a railroad cut and they made it closer to the Confederate line than any other Union force. Night settled in and off to their front rose Elliott's Salient, held by a brigade of South Carolina soldiers and the gunners of Richard Pegram's Virginia Battery.

One week later, on June 25, the soldiers of the 48th would begin to dig a mine underneath this portion of the Confederate line. . . .




The soldiers of the 48th were justly proud of their actions on the Seventeenth and Eighteenth of June; indeed, Bosbyshell later described the attacks on June 17 as the regiment's most brilliant action of the war. But the regiment paid a very heavy price.

During its attacks on June 17-18, the 48th Pennsylvania lost 19 men killed or mortally wounded, 42 men wounded, and 4 men missing/captured, for a total casualty count of 65.

Among those struck down with a mortal injury on that morning of June 17, 1864 was Lieutenant Curtis C. Pollock of Company G. Sweeping forward with the regiment, Pollock was shot in the shoulder and fell to the ground. Sergeant William Auman, also of Company G, rushed to Pollock's aid and helped the young twenty-two-year lieutenant to his feet. Though in considerable pain, said Auman, Pollock remained in good spirits. His first words to Auman: "Wasn't that a splendid charge?" Though he and others considered the wound non-fatal, Pollock succumbed to his injury one week later.



The others who fell that day--and during the next day's assaults--were. .  .


Killed/Mortally Wounded: (19)
Private Francis M. Stidham, Company A (MW6/18/1864; Died 7/10/1864)
Private Gilbert Graham, Company C (MW 6/18/1864; Died 4/1/1865)
Private John Major, Company E (KIA 6/17/1864)
Private William Rasons/Reysons, Company E (MY 6/17/1864; Died 6/24/1864)
Private James Reagan, Company E (MW 6/17/1864; Died 6/30/1864)
Private James Mercer, Company E (MW 6/17/1864; Died 5/21/1865)
Private Horace Straub, Company F (KIA 6/17/1864)
Private Isaac Lewis, Company F (KIA 6/17/1864)
Private Simon Devlin, Company F (KIA 6/18/1864)
Lieutenant Curtis C. Pollock, Company G (MW 6/17/1864; Died 6/23/1864)
Private Howard Jones, Company G (MW 6/17/1864; Died 7/13/1864)
Private George Morey, Company H (KIA 6/17/1864)
Private Jefferson W. Beyerle, Company H (KIA 6/17/1864)
Private James Mulholland, Company H (KIA 6/17/1864)
Private Anthony Gallagher, Company H  (KIA 6/17/1864)
Private Thomas Davis, Company H (KIA 6/18/1864)
Lieutenant Joseph Edwards, Company I (MW 6/17/1864; Died 7/2/1864)
Private Nathan Rich, Company K (KIA 6/17/1864)
Private Arthur Gray (KIA 6/18/1864)


Lieutenant Joseph Edwards, Co. I
Mortally Wounded, June 17
(Hoptak Collection)
Lt. Curtis C. Pollock, Company G
Mortally Wounded, June 17, 1864
(Hoptak Collection) 


Private Francis M. Stidham
Mortally Wounded, June 18, 1864
(Hoptak Collection)







Wounded: (42)
Private Elias Britton, Company A
Private John Holman, Company A
Private John McLean, Company A
Private John Cochran, Company A
Private William Huckey, Company A
Private John Shaffer, Company A
Private Joel Lins, Company A
Private Henry Schreyer, Company A
Private James W. Sterner, Company A
Private William Dreibelbeis, Company A
Private Joseph Dreibelbeis, Company A
Sergeant Robert Campbell, Company B
Corporal James Rider, Company B
Sergeant Henry Weiser, Company C
Lieutenant James K. Helms, Company D
Corporal Jacob Dietrich, Company D
Private Lewis Dietrich, Company D
Private Jacob D. Casper, Company D
Private Joseph Berlinger/Buddinger, Company D
Private Joseph Lindenmuth, Company D
Private Thomas Clemens, Company E
Private R.B. Thompson, Company E
Private Murt Brennan, Company F
Private Patrick Boran, Company F
Corporal Robert Wallace, Company F
Private Edward L. Shissler, Company F
Private Joshua Reed, Company G
Lieutenant David B. Brown, Company H
Private Charles Eberle, Company H
Private Lewis Aurand, Company H
Private Jonathan Dillet, Company H
Private Frank Ringer, Company I
Private William Kramer, Company I
Corporal Benjamin Williams, Company I
Private Christian Seward, Company I
Private Samuel DeFrehn, Company I
Private Jacob Reichwein, Company I
Private Charles Koch, Company I
Sergeant Thomas Irwin, Company K
Private John Gillinger, Company K
Private Oliver Schwartz, Company K
Private David Houser, Company K


Captured/Missing: (4)
Sergeant Andrew Wren, Company B
Private Jacob Wigner, Company B
Private Michael Lavell, Company F
Private William Auchenbach, Company F



Private Elias Britton, Co. A
Wounded
(Hoptak Collection)

Private John Cochran, Co. A
Wounded
(Hoptak Collection)

Lieutenant James K. Helms, Co. D
Severely Wounded
(Courtesy Patriotic Order Sons of America)





* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


Purchase your copy of "Dear Ma:" The Civil War Letters of Curtis Clay Pollock, First Defender and First Lieutenant, 48th Pennsylvania Infantry by clicking here








Monday, May 28, 2018

Remembering the 48th Pennsylvania's Civil War Dead. . .

Organized in the late summer of 1861 and officially disbanded when the regiment was mustered out of service on July 17, 1865, the 48th Pennsylvania was in its existence for almost the entirety of the Civil War. During its nearly four years of service, the 48th campaigned in North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, Kentucky, and Tennessee, covering thousands of miles on foot, on rail, or by water. The regiment also participated in some of the war's most sanguinary battles, suffering especially heavy losses at 2nd Bull Run, Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor, and Petersburg. Hundreds of its soldiers were wounded during the course of the conflict, while at least 329 of its members lost their lives, whether on the battlefield or in hospitals or in prisoner of war camps. And how many other of its soldiers whose lives were cut short, passing away prematurely after the war from injuries or illnesses sustained in service, I cannot say. The wartime dead of the 48th Pennsylvania lay at rest in no fewer than seven states as well as in the District of Columbia. 

On this Memorial Day it is only fitting and proper to take a moment to remember those of the 48th Pennsylvania who, during the course of America's Civil War, gave their last full measure of devotion. Their names and dates of death are listed below, in chronological order of their death, as are some of their images. I have told the stories of many of those listed below including many of those pictured; click their names to discover more about who they were. 


* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *




Lieutenant~Company G
[Courtesy of Mr. Ronn Palm and the Museum of Civil War Images] 




Company E 
[Hoptak Collection]




George Betz
Company A
[Hoptak Collection] 




David Brown
Lieutenant~Company H
[Unknown] 


Company C
[Hoptak Collection] 




Lieutenant~Company E
[Courtesy of Catherine Siegel and Family] 




Company K
[Courtesy of the Dentzer Family] 



Company K
[Courtesy of the Dentzer Family] 




Company G
[The Historical Society of Schuylkill County] 



Captain~Company I
[Courtesy of Mr. Ronn Palm and the Museum of Civil War Images] 



Lieutenant~Company I
[Hoptak Collection] 



Company I
[Courtesy of Mr. Ronn Palm and the Museum of Civil War Images]




Major~48th Pennsylvania
[Hoptak Collection] 



Company G
[From Gould, The Forty Eighth]



Colonel~48th Pennsylvania
[From Bosbyshell, The Story of the Forty-Eighth]





Lieutenant~Company B
[Hoptak Collection] 



Company F
[Courtesy of Mr. Richard Hammons and Mr. Richard Jenkins] 



Lieutenant~Company I
[Courtesy of schulkillhavenhistory.com] 





Company E
[Courtesy of Mr. Brett Adams] 




Charles Norrigan
Corporal~Company H
[Courtesy of Mr. Ronn Palm and the Museum of Civil War Images] 





Lieutenant~Company G
[Courtesy of Mr. Ronn Palm and the Museum of Civil War Images] 




Company A
[Hoptak Collection] 



Company A
[Hoptak Collection] 



Company D
[Patriotic Order Sons of America] 




* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


48th Pennsylvania Civil War Deaths




1861 (8)

William Millet: Co. H: Died: 9/7/1861; Accidentally Killed on the Railroad in Harrisburg
Daniel Reighard: Co. C: 11/11/1861; Died at Camp Hamilton, VA
William Miller: Co. A: Died: 11/21/1861 at Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina.
Sergeant William T. Garrett, Co. H: Died 11/23/1861 at Fortress Monroe
Thomas Davidson, Co. B: Died 11/28/1861 at Hatteras, North Carolina
Lieutenant Alexander Fox, Co. D: Died: 12/1/1861 on steamer Spaulding near Fortress Monroe, VA
William Brerton, Co. F: Died at Ft. Clark, Hatteras Inlet, NC, 12/11/1861
Philip L. Diehl, Co. G: Died 12/23/1861, Hatteras, N.C.         


1862 (98)
Thomas McAvoy, Co. C: 1/14/1862; Died at Camp Winfield, NC
John Spreese, Co. A: Died: 1/21/1862 at New Bern, North Carolina
Surgeon David Minis: Died at Roanoke, North Carolina, N.C., 2/14/1862, of over-exerting himself attending to the wounded
George F. Mains, Co. K: Died 3/30/1862 at Hatteras, NC
Andrew Spear, Co. D: Died 4/15/1862 at Newbern, NC
Bernard West, Co. A: Died: 5/12/1862 in New Bern, North Carolina.
Daniel Flagerty, Co. C: Died 5/28/1862 in Newbern, North Carolina
Andrew Klock, Co. D: Died of typhoid fever 6/30/1862 at Newbern, NC
Charles Treisbach, Co. F: Died 7/1/1862
Addison Seaman, Co. D: Died of Disease,  7/16/1862
Mattis Sheafer, Co. D: Died 8/4/1862; Committed Suicide on board steamer Cossack
Abraham Ferrer, Co. B: Died August 7, 1862
Israel Eiler, Co. B: Died August 7, 1862, in New York
Alexander Boone, Co. I: Died in Fredericksburg, 8/11/1862
Franklin Wetzel, Co. A: Died: 8/12/1862; Drowned in the Potomac River as the result of the sinking of the steamer West Point.
1st Lt. George H. Gressang, Co. I: Drowned 8/12/1862 by the sinking of the steamer West Point
Thomas G. Williams, Co. B: Drowned 8/13/1862 on the Potomac River
John H. Leiser, Co. A: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862.
Louis M. Reece, Co. B: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
John Weiser, Co. C: 8/29/1862; Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run
Barney Gettler, Co. C: 8/29/1862; Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run
Charles Miller, Co. D: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Corporal Leonard Shrishorn, Co. D: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Corporal Israel Vancannon, Co. D: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Mattis Bailey, Co. D: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Cpl. William Mackey/McKay, Co. E: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Michael Brennan, Co. E: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Hugh McFeely, Co. E: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Samuel Moyer, Co. E: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
John Becker/Baker, Co. E: Missing and Presumed Dead at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
John Haggerty, Co. F: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Michael Kilrain, Co. F: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Peter Quinn, Co. F: Supposed to have been Killed at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Thomas Kelley, Co. H: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
William Nagle, Co. H: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862.
Samuel Petit, Co. H: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Charles F. Leiser, Co. I: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Hesgian Link, Co. I: Missing in Action at 2nd Bull Run; Supposed to have died
Captain Henry A.M. Filber, Co. K: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Sergeant Roland D. Filbert, Co. K: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
David Boyer, Co. K: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
David D. Dress, Co. K: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
W. Fenstermacher, Co. K: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
William Labenberger, Co. K: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
Daniel Shanley/Stanley, Co. K: Killed in Action at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862
James Muldowney, Co. G: Mortally Wounded 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862; Died of Wounds       
William Hopkins, Co. F: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died: 8/31/1862 of wounds
George Ramer, Co. A: Died in Georgetown, 9/6/1862
Charles Knerr, Co. H: Died 9/7/1862
Corporal George Ramer, Co. D: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died of Wounds, 9/6/1862
Sergeant William Bambrick, Co. D: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died of Wounds, 9/12/1862
William Smith, Co. G: Mortally Wounded 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862; Died of Wounds, 9/14/1862        
Henry Jenkins, Co. F: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862; died in Georgetown, DC, 9/15/1862
Cpl. John Brobst, Co. A: Mortally Wounded at Antietam, 9/17/1862.
John Robinson, Co. B: Killed in Action at Antietam, 9/17/1862
Alexander Prince, Co. B: Killed in Action at Antietam, 9/18/1862
Alva F. Jeffries, Co. D: Killed in Action at Antietam, 9/17/1862
1st Lieutenant William Cullen, Co. E: Killed in Action at Antietam, 9/17/1862
John Broadbent, Co. E: Killed in Action at Antietam, 9/17/1862
Charles Timmons, Co. G: Killed in Action, Antietam 9/17/1862          
Cpl. Lewis V. Focht, Co. I: Killed in Action at Antietam, 9/17/1862
Corporal Daniel Moser, Co. K: Killed in Action at Antietam, 9/17/1862
George Dentzer, Co. L: Killed in Action at Antietam, 9/17/1862
David Stichter, Co. D: Died in Hospital at Sharpsburg, MD, 9/21/1862
James Farrell, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died: 9/25/1862
Benjamin Hoffman, Co. I: Wounded at South Mountain, 9/14/1862; Died of Wounds 9/25/1862;
John Martin/Morton, Co. E: Died 9/25/1862
John Springer, Co. A: Died: 10/9/1862 from Wounds Received in Action.
John Sullivan, Co. D: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died of Wounds, 10/8/1862
Cpl. Albert T. Frazier, Co. C: Died 10/14/1862 of Consumption in Alexandria, VA
Sgt. Benjamin G. Otto, Co. A: Wounded in Action; Died of Wounds: 10/15/1862
James Winters, Co. K: Died 10/15/1862 at Fortress Monroe, VA
Peter Boyer, Co. K: Died in 10/22/1862 in Cressona, PA
John J. Morrison, Co. F: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died 10/23/1862
Corporal Patrick Handley, Co. K: Died 10/25/1862 in Washington, D.C.
Joseph Low, Co. C: Died 10/29/1862 in Alexandria of Wounds Received in Action
Thomas Major, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died: 10/31/1862
Edward Daniels, Co. C: Died 11/1/1862 of Chronic Diarrhea in Alexandria
John Farne, Co. G: Mortally Wounded 2nd Bull Run, 8/29/1862; Died of Wounds 11/8/1862              
Edward McCabe, Co. G: Died of Disease, Washington, D.C., 11/12/1862
Peter Burke, Co. K: Died of Typhoid Fever, 11/14/1862
Corporal Charles C. Hinkle, Co. H: Died 11/23/1862, at Hatteras, North Carolina
Corporal Raymond A. Jenkins, Co. H: Died 12/8/1862 in Ascension Hospital, Washington
J.W. Heebner/Heevener, Co. D: Died of chronic diarrhea, 12/9/1862
Elijah Knight, Co. E: Died in Annapolis, 12/12/1862
John Ruff, Co. A: Died in Washington: 12/13/1862
James Williams, Co. A: Killed in Action at Fredericksburg: 12/13/1862
Cpl. Joseph B. Carter, Co. A: Mortally Wounded at Fredericksburg, 12/13/1862.
Michael Divine, Co. B: Killed in Action at Fredericksburg, VA, 12/13/1862
John Williams, Co. B: Killed in Action at Fredericksburg, VA, 12/13/1862
William Hill, Co. B: Killed in Action at Fredericksburg, VA, 12/13/1862
Cpl. Reuben Robinson, Co. B: Killed in Action at Fredericksburg, VA, 12/13/1862
Henry Williamson, Co. D: Killed in Action at Fredericksburg, 12/13/1862
Thomas Kinney, Co. D: Killed in Action at Fredericksburg, 12/13/1862
Thomas Connell, Co. B: Died of Disease, 12/18/1862
Musician Abraham Wadsworth, Co. B: Died: 12/18/1862 in Port Carbon, PA
Henry Burnish, Co. G: Died in Pottsville, 12/20/1862, of chronic diarrhea        
Cpl. Edward F. Schappell, Co. I: Wounded at Fredericksburg, 12/13/1862; Died in hospital of wounds, Date -Unknown


1863 (17)
Corporal John H. Derr, Co. D : Mortally Wounded at Fredericksburg; Died of Wounds in Washington, 1/2/1863
George Briggle, Co. A: Died in Philadelphia: 1/4/1863.
Nicholas Shitehour, Co. B: Died 1/13/1863 in Washington, D.C. of chronic diarrhea
James Bergan, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died: 1/11/1863
Samuel Brooks, Co. B: Died 1/13/1863 near Falmouth, Virginia
Levi Fisher, Co. I: In Hospital at Harpers Ferry, 8/16/1862; Died, 1/21/1863
George Shertle, Co. D: Died of Disease 2/8/1863 in Washington, D.C.
Sgt. Arthur P. Hatch, Co. C: 2/13/1863; Died in Newport News of heart disease
Jacob H. Rumble, Co. I: Died: 4/14/1863
Jacob Smith, Co. C: 5/3/1863; Died of diarrhea in Baltimore, MD
Andrew Scott, Co. C: 6/27/1863; Killed in Lexington, KY
Valentine Raush, Co. G: Drowned 6/11 or 12/1863   
Corporal Joseph Reed, Co. H: Killed 11/16/1863 at Campbell’s Station, TN.
Joseph Weise, Co. H: Died in Knoxville, TN, 11/21/1863
John Sponslor/Sponsler, Co. H: Killed 11/29/1863 at Knoxville, TN
Jonas Haldeman, Co. I: Killed in Action, Knoxville, TN, 11/29/1863
Cpl. Charles Weaver, Co. I: Died 12/5/1863 in Knoxville, TN, of wounds received 12/3/1863
Josiah Kramer, Co. I: Died: December 1863

1864 (157)
Thomas J. Thomas, Co. F: Died of Typhoid Fever, 1/22/1864
Patrick Brown, Co. F: Killed in a railroad accident, 1/24/1864, Paris, Kentucky
George Livingston, Co. A: Captured; Died in Libby Prison, Richmond, VA, 2/4/1864
James Shields, Co. E: Murdered in Silver Creek, 2/26/1864
James W. Evans, Co. F: Died in Hospital, 3/2/1864
John Burnhart, Co. B: Died 3/8/1864; Buried in Knoxville, Tennessee
Isaac Arndt, Co. I: Wounded Severely in hip; left on field at Campbell's Station; and Missing in Action, 11/16/1863; Captured, Held Prisoner of War at Andersonville; Not on Muster Out Roll; PA Civil War Service Cards Lists Him As Having Died 3/16/1863 (1864?) at Canard Station, Tennessee.
John Dietrich, Co. D: Died 3/22/1864
Michael Wilson, Co. F: Died of "nostalgia, or home-sickness," or of chronic diarrhea, 3/24/1864, at Annapolis, MD.
William Phillips, Co. G: Died 3/26/1864 in Pottsville
Reuben Watt, Co. I: Died March 31, 1864, Annapolis, MD
Thomas S. Lewis, Co. H: Died 3/31/1864 at Philadelphia
Charles Clark, Co. G: Died: 4/6/1864 in Annapolis, Maryland
William H. Smith, Co. D: Died in Annapolis, 4/7/1864
Peter Litchfield, Co. F: Died 4/9/1864, Annapolis, Maryland
Peter Zimmerman, Co. A: Died: 4/11/1864 in Annapolis, Maryland.
John Donnelly, Co. H: Died 4/20/1864 at Annapolis, Maryland
Edward Edwards, Co. H: Died of sunstroke, 4/23/1864 at Annapolis, Maryland
Lewis J. Garber, Co. I: Died 4/23/1864, Annapolis, Maryland
Valentine Frantz, Co. E: Committed Suicide, 4/28/1864
Charles DeLong, Co. H: Died 5/4/1864 at Bristoe Station
Jno. Burke, Co. E: Killed in Action at the Wilderness, 5/5/1864
Lawrence Farrell, Co. E: Killed in Action at the Wilderness, 5/6/1864
Jonathan Kauffman, Co. D: Killed in Action at the Wilderness, 5/6/1864
David F. Thiel, Co. F: Killed in Action at the Wilderness, 5/6/1864
Simon Moyer, Co. B: Killed in Action at the Wilderness, 5/7/1864
Israel Manning, Co. F: Wounded at the Wilderness, 5/6/1864; Died of Wounds 5/8/1864
Jno. T. Huntzinger, Co. A: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania: 5/12/1864
Isaac Otto, Co. A: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864.
Lewis M. Robinhold, Co. A: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania: 5/12/1864
Charles A.T. St. Clair, Co. A: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania: 5/12/1864
John Deitz, Co. B: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Frederick Knittle, Co. B: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Matthew Hume, Co. B: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Cpl. David J. Davis, Co. B: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Daniel Wary, Co. B: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Laurentus C. Moyer, Co. B: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
John Morrissey, Co. F: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Richard Williams, Co. F: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Lewis Woods, Co. F: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Jno. Powell, Co. F: Mortally Wounded at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864; Died of Wounds
James Brennan, Co. F: Died of wounds received at Spotsylvania; Date Unknown
2nd Lt. Henry C. Jackson, Co. G: Killed in Action Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864      
William Williams, Co. G: Killed in Action Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864      
Henry J. Ege, Co. I: Killed in Action, 5/12/1864, Spotsylvania, Virginia
Jno. W. Henn, Co. K: Killed in Action at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864
Daniel Brown, Co. C: 5/12/1864; Killed in Action at Spotsylvania
Michael Mohan, Co. C: 5/20/1864; Died in Washington of wounds received at Spotsylvania
Sgt. William Kissinger, Co. B: Wounded at Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864; Died of Wounds, 5/24/1864
Joseph Chester, Co. H: Wounded: 5/15/1864; Died: 5/24/1864 of wounds received in battle
Frederick Henry, Co. I: Wounded in Action, 5/25/1864; Supposed to have died from wounds in ambulance and buried by the wayside
Corporal Charles Norrigan/Norrigang, Co. H: Killed in Action at North Anna Crossing, 5/26/1864
Patrick Doolin, Co. F: Killed in Action at Bethesda Church, 5/30/1864
Henry McCann, Co. F: Killed in Action at Armstrong Farm, 5/31/1864
Lieutenant Samuel B. Laubenstein, Co. H: Killed at Shady Grove Church, 5/31/1864
James Spencer, Co. G: Mortally Wounded Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864; Died of Wounds 5/31/1864
John Cochran, Co. A: Died: 6/1864 near Cold Harbor, VA.
David Williams, Co. E: Killed in Action at Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
James Bradley, Co. F: Killed in Action at Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
Edward G. Pugh, Co. F: Killed in Action at Cold Harbor , 6/3/1864
William Smith, Co. F: Killed in Action at Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
Cpl. Alexander Govan, Co. G: Killed in Action Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
James Allison, Co. G: Killed in Action Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
Joseph Alexander, Co. H: Killed in Action at Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
George Dresh, Co. I: Killed in Action, 6/3/1864, Cold Harbor
William J. Price, Co. I: Killed at Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
Benjamin B. Kershner, Co. I: Killed in Action at Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
Jacob Lauby/Landy, Co. K: Killed in Action at Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864
Daniel Reedy, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at Cold Harbor; Died: 6/6/1864
John Clark, Co. I: Wounded Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864; Died of Wounds 6/8/1864
Major Joseph A. Gilmour: Mortally Wounded in Action, 5/31/1864; Died of Wounds 6/9/1864
Anthony Wade, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at Cold Harbor; Died: 6/9/1864
Christian Lauer, Co. B: Died 6/10/1864, of wounds received in action
Samuel Heckman, Co. B: Died 6/12/1864, of wounds received in action
George Airgood, Co. A: Wounded at Petersburg; Died of Wounds
Simon Snyder, Co. A: Died: 6/16/1864 of Wounds Received in Action
Simon Devlin, Co. F: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/16/1864
Nathan Rich, Co. K: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/16/1864
Andrew Wesner, Co. F: Died 6/17/1864
George Betz, Co. A: Mortally Wounded at Petersburg, 6/17/1864
John Major, Co. E: Killed at Petersburg, 6/17/1864
Isaac Lewis, Co. F: Killed in Action at Petersburg 6/17/1864
Horace Straub, Co. F: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/17/1864
Anthony Gallagher, Co. H: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/17/1864
Jeff. W. Beyerley, Co. H: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/17/1864
George W. Morey, Co. H: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/17/1864
James Mulholland, Co. H: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/17/1864
Arthur Gray, Co. K: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/18/1864
Thomas Davis, Co. H: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/18/1864
Ephraim Whetstone, Co. K: Died June 1864 from wounds received in action
Daniel Okum, Co. D: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/21/1864
Lewis Hessinger, Co. A: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 6/22/1864
William Evans, Co. E: Died of Chronic Diarrhea, 6/22/1864
Jeremiah Willoner/Willouer, Co. I: Wounded, severely, Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864; Died of Wounds 6/22/1864
James Boner, Co. I: Wounded 5/30/1864; Died of Wounds 6/22/1864
Abraham Gecker, Co. C: 6/23/1864; Killed in Action at Petersburg
John Whitaker, Co. C: 6/23/1864; Killed in Action at Petersburg
1st Lt. Curtis C. Pollock, Co. G: Mortally Wounded Petersburg 6/17/1864; Died of wounds: 6/23/1864
William Reysons/Rasons, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at Petersburg, 6/17/1864; Died: 6/24/1864
William Schwartz, Co. B: Died 6/26/1864
Daniel J. Kehl, Co. I: Died June 26, 1864, City Point, VA
William Simpson, Co. G: Killed in Action Petersburg 6/26/1864
Lt. William H. Hume, Co. B: Mortally Wounded in Action, 5/31/1864 at Totopotomy Creek, VA; Died of -Wounds, 6/30/1864
James Reagan, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at Petersburg, 6/17/1864; Died: 6/30/1864
Jonas Z. Raber, Co. D: Died 7/1/1864 in Washington, D.C.
John Armstrong, Co. G: Mortally Wounded Spotsylvania, 5/12/1864; Died of Wounds 7/1/1864
1st Lt. Joseph Edwards, Co. I: Wounded at Petersburg, 6/17/1864; Died of Wounds 7/2/1864
Job Hirst, Co. H: Wounded at Cold Harbor, 6/3/1864; Died 7/3/1864 of wounds received in action
David Houser, Co. A: Died: 7/4/1864
Henry Dorward, Co. D: Killed in Action near Petersburg, 7/5/1864
Nelson Simon, Co. A: Died in Minersville: 7/5/1864.
James McElrath, Co. C: 7/7/1864; Died from chronic diarrhea in Andersonville Prison
Sgt. Thomas Tosh, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at Cold Harbor; Died of Wounds: 7/7/1864
Francis M. Stidham, Co. A: Died 7/10/1864 of Wounds Received in Action
J. Howard Jones, Co. G: Mortally Wounded Petersburg, 6/17/1864; Died of Wounds: 7/13/1864
Isaac Bannon/Brannan, Co. H: Killed 7/16/1864 in US General Hospital at Alexandria, VA.
Charles Quinn, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at Petersburg, 6/17/1864; Died: 7/24/1864
Lewis Beableheimer, Co. I : Wounded at Petersburg 7/24/1864; Died of Wounds, 7/26/1864
Captain Benjamin B. Schuck, Co. I: Wounded at Petersburg, 6/25/1864; Died of Wounds, 7/27/1864;
Lieutenant David B. Brown, Co. H: Killed at Petersburg, 8/5/1864
Elias Zimmerman, Co. D: Died in Fairfax Seminary Hospital, 8/5/1864
Isaac K. Beltz, Co. I: Wounded Cold Harbor 6/3/1864; Died of Wounds 8/10/1864
Solomon Eyster, Co. D: Died 8/15/1864 in Philadelphia
Edward Sweeney, Co. C: 8/17/1864; Died in Mount Douglass General Hospital
Frank Boyer, Co. E: Captured at Cold Harbor; Died at Andersonville Prison, 8/17/1864
Frank Queeny, Co. F: Died of Dropsy, 8/21/1864
Richard Lee, Co. A: Died in Pottsville, 8/21/1864
Edward Gallagher, Co. A: Captured; Died in Andersonville Prison, 8/21/1864 from diarrhea
Daniel Neyer, Co. I: Died at City Point, Virginia, 8/22/1864
William Davis, Co. H: Wounded at Cold Harbor, VA, 6/3/1864; Died of Wounds: 9/5/1864 
Henry Reb, Co. H: Died of Paralysis 9/5/1864 on David's Island, New York
Isaac Fetterman/Fetter, Co. H: Captured; Died in Andersonville Prison, 9/8/1864, from diarrhea
George Lawrence, Co. G: Died 9/11/1864 at Port Carbon, PA
William Engle, Co. B: Died at Willet's Point, New York, 9/11 or 12/1864
William Schneider, Co. H: Died 9/12/1864, of wounds received in action
Daniel Root, Co. B: Died in Andersonville Prison, 9/14/1864, from diarrhea
Patrick Farrell, Co. C: 9/21/1864; Died in Washington
John Darragh, Co. E: Killed in Action at Poplar Grove/Peebles’s Farm, 9/30/1864
James Heiser, Co. I: Killed in Action, 9/30/1864, Pegram's Farm/Poplar Springs Church
Lewis W. Kopp, Co. H: Died of Phthsis Pulmonalis 10/1/1864
Joseph Cobus, Co. I: Wounded and Captured Pegram's Farm, 9/30/1864; Died of Wounds, 10/4/1864
Daniel Boyer, Co. E: Killed at Petersburg, 10/5/1864
Daniel M. Bankes, Co. B: Died at Annapolis, MD, 10/6/1864
Jno. Lloyd, Co. H: Wounded 8/9/1864; Died 10/25/1864 at his home in Schuylkill County.
David Miller, Co. F: Wounded at Pegram's Farm; Died in Annapolis, 11/6/1864
Jacob Hammer, Co. B: Died in Salisbury Prison, NC, 11/12/1864
Edward McGinnis, Co. E: Captured at Peebles’s Farm; Died in Salisbury Prison, 11/17/1864
Patrick Crowe, Co. I: Captured Pegram's Farm, 9/30/1864; Died in Salisbury Prison, N.C., 11/19/1864
Lewis Douglass, Co. I: Died: 11/22/1864
Philip Heffron, Co. H: Captured at Pegram's Farm, 9/30/1864; Died of starvation in Salisbury Prison, 11/25/1864
Michael Condron, Co. C: 11/29/1864; Died in Salisbury Prison, NC
Emmanuel Fox, Co. H: Died 12/5/1864 at Baptist Church Hospital, Alexandria, VA.
George Hartz, Co. D: Died of Wounds Received in Action at Petersburg, 12/20/1864
Corporal John F. Dentzer, Co. K: Killed at Petersburg, 12/28/1864
Robert Devine, Co. E: Died of Chronic Diarrhea, 12/28/1864
Elijah DeFrehn, Co. F: Captured at Pegram's Farm, 9/30/1864; Died 12/30/1864 in Salisbury Prison, North Carolina



1865 (41) 
Jacob Wigner/Wagner, Co. B: Died 1/1/1865;
Cpl. William Livingston, Co. C: 1/2/1865; KIA at Fort Sedgwick
Abraham Sigmund, Co. E: Killed at Petersburg, 1/7/1865
William D. Lloyd, Co. H: Died 1/10/1865 at Lincoln Hospital, Washington, D.C.
Andrew Neeley, Co. C: 1/12/1865; Died in Washington of chronic diarrhea 
Samuel Schollenberger, Co. A: Captured; Died in Salisbury Prison, Salisbury, North Carolina: 1/16/1865.
Joseph Finley/Findley, Co. F: Captured at Pegram's Farm, 9/30/1864; Died in Salisbury Prison, 1/22/1865
Michael Welsh, Co. F: Captured 9/30/1864 at Pegram's Farm; Died in Salisbury Prison, 2/6/1865
Charles Aurand, Co. H: Died: 2/9/1865
William Fulton, Co. F: Captured at Pegram's Farm, 9/30/1864; Died in Salisbury Prison, 2/12/1865
Corporal Philip Beckman, Co. D: Died in Baltimore of chronic diarrhea, 2/9/1865
Charles Dintinger, Co. C: 2/11/1865; Died in Salisbury Prison, 11/1864
George T. Eisenhuth, Co. H: Died of Chronic Diarrhea 2/17/1865
Nicholas Delaney, Co. K: Killed at Petersburg, 2/23/1865
Nicholas Gross: Died of Chronic Diarrhea, 3/12/1865, Annapolis, Maryland
Cpl. Patrick Rogers, Co. E: Died of Disease, 3/25/1865
1st Lieutenant Henry Graeff, Co. D: Died in Pottsville, 3/26/1865, of Disease Contracted in Confederate Prisons.
Gilbert Graham, Co. C: 4/1/1865; Died of Wounds
William Jenkins, Co. F: Died: 4/1/1865
Sgt. John Homer, Co. B: Died, 4/2/1865, of wounds received in action on 4/1/1865
Colonel George W. Gowen: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865.
John Coutts, Co. B: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
Daniel D. Barnett, Co. E: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
David McElvie, Co. F: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
William Donnelly, Co. H: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
James King, Co. H: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
George Uhl, Co. H: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
Albert Mack, Co. I: Killed at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
Jacob Reichwein, Co. I :Killed at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
Albert Zimmerman, Co. I: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
Wesley Boyer, Co. I: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865.
Simon Hoffman, Co. K: Killed in Action at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
Lewis Sterner, Co. A: Died: 4/11/1865; Buried: Odd Fellows’ Cemetery, Tamaqua, PA
Aaron P. Wagner, Co. D: Mortally Wounded at Petersburg, 4/2/1865; Died of Wounds 4/15/1865 in Washington, D.C.
Nicholas C. Stephens, Co. B: Died 4/20/1865, of wounds received at Petersburg 4/2/1865
Cpl. James Nicholson, Co. C: Died: 4/24/1865 of Wounds Received at Petersburg, 4/2/1865
James Mercer, Co. E: Mortally Wounded at Petersburg, 6/17/1864; Died: 5/21/1865
John Frehn, Co. B: Died in Philadelphia, 6/8/1865; Veteran
Jonathan Dress, Co. K: Died 7/5/1865 in Philadelphia, PA
Corporal Walter P. Aims/Amos, Co. D: Died 7/12/1865 from the effects of starvation and brutality while in Confederate prison 
Charles F. Hesser, Co. D: Died 7/25/1865 in Washington, D.C.



Unknown (7) 
William Moose, Co. E: Wounded at 2nd Bull Run; Died at Home, Date Unknown
Henry Simpson, Co. A: Killed in Battle. 
Sgt. Stafford Johnson, Co. E: Died at Home, Date Unknown
William Atkins, Co. B: Died at home, while on furlough; Date Unknown
Cpl. James Brennan, Co. E: Captured at Knoxville, Died at Andersonville Prison, Date Unknown

William H. Kohler, Co. F: Captured at Pegram's Farm, 9/30/1864; Died in Salisbury Prison
Joshua Reed, Co. G: Captured 9/30/1864 at Pegram's Farm; Held in Salisbury Prison; Died at home from effects of prison confinement.